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    Registered User Darkius's Avatar
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    Can intense bicycling preserve quadricep mass during a cut?

    I've got knee problems and am prepping to do a cut. I don't want my quads shrinking. But the only way I can use more weight on my knee is if I don't go down far or if I use assistance once down far. Bicycling seems my best bet, and I can get them burning.


    If I lose 0.7% of my body weight per week, will I likely lose quadracep mass if I don't do heavy leg presses?
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    NASM-CPT xsquid99's Avatar
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    From a training perspective, bicycling is often worse for knees than squatting or leg presses. Cycling = high probability of overuse which usually results in even more knee pain.

    If a client told me they had knee pain (and they were cleared by a health professional of any damage and given the OK for training) then I would actually make them focus more on strength training to help build those joints back up, which would usually start with some form of squatting.
    All it takes is consistency, effort, proper nutrition, good programming, and TIME.
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  3. #3
    Registered User Darkius's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by xsquid99 View Post
    From a training perspective, bicycling is often worse for knees than squatting or leg presses. Cycling = high probability of overuse which usually results in even more knee pain.

    If a client told me they had knee pain (and they were cleared by a health professional of any damage and given the OK for training) then I would actually make them focus more on strength training to help build those joints back up, which would usually start with some form of squatting.
    Nice to know about the bicycling causing damage. I wonder how much is overuse.


    My sports doctor showed me that there is a crack in the cartilage on the back of my knee cap. He says only 20% of people with a crack that size will need surgery. He recommended squating with weights and said failure to do so would lead to weakening of other structures and eventual surgery.


    Nice to see you both agree.
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    NASM-CPT xsquid99's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Darkius View Post
    Nice to know about the bicycling causing damage. I wonder how much is overuse.
    Repetitive motion disorders are a real thing. But there is no quantifiable amount of use that can result in pain, its going to be different for anyone going through something like that.

    I used to have knee pain years ago before I started strength training from years of skiing, and so did 2 of my current clients. I'm very cautious to start out at the beginning with them, meaning light or even no weight at all, and slowly build their strength up.
    All it takes is consistency, effort, proper nutrition, good programming, and TIME.
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    Registered User Darkius's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by xsquid99 View Post
    Repetitive motion disorders are a real thing. But there is no quantifiable amount of use that can result in pain, its going to be different for anyone going through something like that.

    I used to have knee pain years ago before I started strength training from years of skiing, and so did 2 of my current clients. I'm very cautious to start out at the beginning with them, meaning light or even no weight at all, and slowly build their strength up.
    Today I did several sets off different one legged lunges while pulling on a strap to reduce the load. Zero knee pain. Lots of lung and leg exercise.

    I don't think a bicycle is necessary, though I might incorporate it later. My legs are done enough for the day. I want to see how they feel in 48 hours before I do anything else.
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    Train hard play harder Tommy W.'s Avatar
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    It all depends. Do what causes no pain. More isn't better, just do enough to maintain strength. Sometimes a couple sets is all that's necessary. Wait until you're healed before going back to harder, longer training
    If you don't get what you want you didn't want it bad enough
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    Originally Posted by xsquid99 View Post
    From a training perspective, bicycling is often worse for knees than squatting or leg presses. Cycling = high probability of overuse which usually results in even more knee pain.

    If a client told me they had knee pain (and they were cleared by a health professional of any damage and given the OK for training) then I would actually make them focus more on strength training to help build those joints back up, which would usually start with some form of squatting.
    Enthusiast cyclist here. I won't argue that over use injuries are a real thing. However, knee pain in cycling is almost always caused by an improper bike fit. Meaning, the position you are in on the bike is not proper for your body size/shape. I've been riding 5,000 - 6,000 miles a year for the last 4 years, and have no knee pain, or repetitive injury. BUT, I have dialed in my bike fit to something that works for me.

    If you are going out for a casual 15 minutes around the block, fit is not that big of a deal. But if you are riding for 2 - 3 hours at a time, and hammering, fit becomes critical. Once you have the right fit, you can rides for hours with no issues.
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