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  1. #1
    Registered User TodDaWild's Avatar
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    Question about calculating a accurate BMR

    (not really sure if this is the correct part of the forum to post this, i'm sorry if it is not)

    Hi, so I have a question about calculating an accurate BMR
    Are the online calculators a accurate way of showing what your BMR is?
    Is there a big difference between a high body fat% BMR and high muscle BMR?

    I keep seeing and reading random posts about people half my size eating 3000cal. a day for maintenance and it surprises me a bit

    I have almost no idea on this subject , just trying to get a bit more information here

    --I am 104kg / 229lbs , 1.83cm / 6ft and 27yrs old

    TLDR: How does someone calculate their BMR very accurately?
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  2. #2
    Moderator SuffolkPunch's Avatar
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    No, they are not accurate, they are educated guesses based on broad population statistics (to produce a BMR) with highly subjective "activity factors" (to generate a TDEE from the BMR)

    Yes, more lean mass usually means more BMR. This is a very simple but quite reliable calculator:
    https://peterbond.org/calculate-rmr-cunningham-equation

    The main input to this is your weight and BF% (hence your fat free mass). Again this is only reliable at the population level, there is huge variance between individuals.

    We recommend starting with a guess from a calculator, running a fixed calorie level for at least 2 weeks, weigh in every morning after peeing and before eating. Then you can measure the slope of the resulting data to determine your weight change. Adjusting for that will give you an estimated TDEE.
    Last edited by SuffolkPunch; 09-15-2021 at 05:58 AM.
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  3. #3
    Moderator SuffolkPunch's Avatar
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    I see from another thread that you have been dieting recently. If this means you have a known calorie intake and a recent set of weigh-ins, I can estimate your TDEE from this if you like.

    Post the raw numbers, no punctuation or other guff. (I'm not deleting "kg" from every line)
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  4. #4
    Registered User TodDaWild's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by SuffolkPunch View Post
    I see from another thread that you have been dieting recently. If this means you have a known calorie intake and a recent set of weigh-ins, I can estimate your TDEE from this if you like.

    Post the raw numbers, no punctuation or other guff. (I'm not deleting "kg" from every line)
    Thanks for making this a bit more clear for me , I don't have any weigh ins to give you, last time i weigh myself is about a week or more at 104kg, and it was about a month or more the other time i did which was around 105. I feel like i lose a bit of motivation or get disappointed if i don't see change (i know its a bit stupid) so i dont really weigh often, i keep my calorie intake around 2100 - 2300 and i weigh train 6 times a week on a PPL split which i really do push myself in.
    I see change in the mirror which i like
    but i do want to start getting a good idea on what my personal BMR is, and really "know" what im doing

    So i'll try and do what you suggested, but i have a question on that. Lets say hypothetically that the scale doesn't change or even goes up, but its because of muscle gain, how do i go about figuring out what is what?
    I start measuring my bodyfat% with calipers and then see what fat i lost and what muscle i gained? Or am i completely wrong and muscle mass doesn't really happen that quickly?
    Also, are the scales that measure bodyfat% and body mass accurate or should i not bother buying one?
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    Moderator SuffolkPunch's Avatar
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    It's a good idea to weigh in every day. This actually gives you a better ability to see a long term trend in your weight - and a better appreciation of what is day to day "noise" (which is usually caused by changing levels of water, food and glycogen in your body).

    No statistician will ever prefer less data to more...

    The problem with (for example) only weighing once a week is that the first reading could be lower than normal and the last could be higher than normal. This could show that you apparently are gaining weight when the real amount of fat in your body is slowly going down.

    No, don't buy bodyfat scales.... they are horribly inaccurate and I would not even use them to try to show a change over time. Calipers are not much better in inexpert hands. They are also fooled by changing levels of skin hydration.

    My advice is just use scales. Maybe you could put a tapemeasure around your waist and check that your gym lifts are steadily improving too.
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  6. #6
    Registered User TodDaWild's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by SuffolkPunch View Post
    It's a good idea to weigh in every day. This actually gives you a better ability to see a long term trend in your weight - and a better appreciation of what is day to day "noise" (which is usually caused by changing levels of water, food and glycogen in your body).

    No statistician will ever prefer less data to more...
    Now that you point it out, i absolutely agree with you, and will start doing that. I appreciate that you take the time to explain and help out.
    You said weigh after peeing, what about poop ?
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