Reply
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Registered User lickitungg's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2019
    Age: 51
    Posts: 9
    Rep Power: 0
    lickitungg is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    lickitungg is offline

    Disrupted scapulohumeral rhythm (right shoulder pain)

    Hi everyone,

    I have been suffering from right shoulder pain for 8 months now.
    Injured it somehow while benchpressing or overhead pressing (no particular acute event that I could remember).
    Pain is anterior, dull with not clear spot that you can touch to elicit tenderness and there is some annoying feeling in my shoulder when I raise my arms overhead.
    Strength is not compromised at all.
    I can bench full strength but a few hours later and the next days there is annoying inflammatory pain that arises in the area.

    I rested my shoulder during the pandemic but right after I got back into regular lifting, pain resurfaced and persisted, suggesting a friction process re-igniting inflammation. I saw a shoulder specialist and had an MRI. MRI only shows supraspinatus tendinosis. No tears. No cartilage damage. No obvious labral tear. An x-ray did not show any major acromion abnormalities.

    I saw a PT this week and she immediately recognized that I have a problem with my right scapula. She said that my muscles below the scapula are clearly atrophic and she can see that my scapulohumeral rhythm is very disrupted on the right side where I have pain. I found articles suggesting that when you have RC pathology, you get stuck into a circle where disruption of the rhythm gets worse and feeds the impingement process. Instead of having a smooth scapular rotation during overhead movements, the scapula separates rapidly and excessively from the ribcage and causes impingement on the RC muscles.

    She gave me a set of exercises to strengthen all the muscles around the scapula (lower traps, rhomboids and serratus). The goal is to bring back that scapula down and pinned onto the ribcage.

    She said that building these small muscles will take time and that I need at least 6 weeks to feel any difference. By that time, hopefully the subacromial space will be larger and the supraspinatus tendon better healed. In the meantime, no benching, no overhead pressing, nothing above shoulder height.

    I told her that during the months preceding my injury I was obsessed with shoulder and chest exercises. I ignored my back and might have created and anterior-posterior imbalance which led to injury. She agreed and said that my posture and my constant work on keyboard during the day also leads to back muscle weakness.

    Has anybody been into such a scenario? How did exercises go? Is there light at the end of the tunnel?
    I really would like to go back to benching without pain.

    Thanks
    Reply With Quote

  2. #2
    Registered User Szyszak's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2019
    Age: 51
    Posts: 89
    Rep Power: 66
    Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10) Szyszak is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    Szyszak is offline
    Originally Posted by lickitungg View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I have been suffering from right shoulder pain for 8 months now.
    Injured it somehow while benchpressing or overhead pressing (no particular acute event that I could remember).
    Pain is anterior, dull with not clear spot that you can touch to elicit tenderness and there is some annoying feeling in my shoulder when I raise my arms overhead.
    Strength is not compromised at all.
    I can bench full strength but a few hours later and the next days there is annoying inflammatory pain that arises in the area.

    I rested my shoulder during the pandemic but right after I got back into regular lifting, pain resurfaced and persisted, suggesting a friction process re-igniting inflammation. I saw a shoulder specialist and had an MRI. MRI only shows supraspinatus tendinosis. No tears. No cartilage damage. No obvious labral tear. An x-ray did not show any major acromion abnormalities.

    I saw a PT this week and she immediately recognized that I have a problem with my right scapula. She said that my muscles below the scapula are clearly atrophic and she can see that my scapulohumeral rhythm is very disrupted on the right side where I have pain. I found articles suggesting that when you have RC pathology, you get stuck into a circle where disruption of the rhythm gets worse and feeds the impingement process. Instead of having a smooth scapular rotation during overhead movements, the scapula separates rapidly and excessively from the ribcage and causes impingement on the RC muscles.

    She gave me a set of exercises to strengthen all the muscles around the scapula (lower traps, rhomboids and serratus). The goal is to bring back that scapula down and pinned onto the ribcage.

    She said that building these small muscles will take time and that I need at least 6 weeks to feel any difference. By that time, hopefully the subacromial space will be larger and the supraspinatus tendon better healed. In the meantime, no benching, no overhead pressing, nothing above shoulder height.

    I told her that during the months preceding my injury I was obsessed with shoulder and chest exercises. I ignored my back and might have created and anterior-posterior imbalance which led to injury. She agreed and said that my posture and my constant work on keyboard during the day also leads to back muscle weakness.

    Has anybody been into such a scenario? How did exercises go? Is there light at the end of the tunnel?
    I really would like to go back to benching without pain.

    Thanks
    The reason why you made your scapulohumeral rhythm disturbed is cause of retract and depress of the scapula at the bench press I would say and basically do this stupid cue too often in other different exercises I suppose. And think twice whether you want to bring the scapula even lower cause offten people with scapulohumeral rhythm disturbed got weakness in upward rotators and their scapula sit already too low and need more elevation. So not only serratus and lower traps need work but also upper traps as well. And if rhomboids are dominant you not gonna bring your arm high enough in over head position, so sometimes they need good manual therapy cause they set the scapula into downward rotation and you got lack of upward rotation.
    Reply With Quote

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts