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  1. #1
    Registered User hglip's Avatar
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    Alternate Exercise List While Injured / Rehabbing

    Being over 35 and doing various combat sports as a hobby, I am constantly getting injured. I'm also prone to injury and at least a few times a year, I'm taken out of things for a few weeks at a time for one reason or another.

    Currently, I am rehabbing a wrist injury that will recover if I let it rest for 2 weeks.

    My problem is, if I don't work out while I'm injured, then I'll only be able to work out maybe 70% of the time. Also, I'm not too familiar with strength and conditioning exercises, so when I'm injured, I usually just stop entirely.

    What I'd like to do is develop a list of exercises I can do when I'm injured. For example, I have a wrist injury currently. I can't squat, press, deadlift, farmers carry, or anything that involves holding a weight in my hand. But I could do some core work on my back, body weight squats, body weight lunges, etc.

    Before I reinvent the wheel, does anything like this exist? I think it would need to start as a catalog of all possible movements I may want to do, and then list which injuries would preclude me from doing them, and then I can search this for a new routine when I'm injured.

    It's probably all common sense to people who have been lifting for a long time, but for me, I get overwhelmed with the possibilities, and I'm busy in my non-working out life, so when I get injured I usually just stop working out completely for 2 or 3 weeks, which is getting harder to come back from as I get older.
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  2. #2
    Weak and foolish OldFartTom's Avatar
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    Not sure there's a clear list of injury friendly exercises because injuries vary so much. You've just got to be sensible and work round and sometimes be creative. For example I've heard of people with some shoulder or wrist injuries (your case may be different though) who are able to squat moderate weights high bar with two small workout towels folded around the bar to make handles (grip moves down and forwards) a bit like a safety squat bar handles. But you've got to try what works for you in the circumstance. Be creative... and sensible too
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  3. #3
    Registered User air2fakie's Avatar
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    It's prob more efficient to make up your own lists as you get specific injuries, rather than create some universal injury alternative matrix.

    For your wrist injury, look into a heavy adjustable weighted vest (e.g., 150 lbs) which will allow you to do some of your exercises with a decent level resistance. And reconsider your combat sports hobby as you get older.
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    temporary illusion supramax's Avatar
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    After a period of inactivity, resting the injured area, you need to start movement again. **** technique, no matter how it comes about (too much weight, inattentiveness, etc.) is usually, if not always, the cause of injury. So, an injury friendly exercise is the same exercise that you were doing when the injury manifested, except the poundage should be extremely light.
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    PT, DPT matthewkelling's Avatar
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    There really are too many variables to create a blanket injury response program because just like right now you need a bunch of options that don't involve gripping.

    With regard to your current injury I would invest in a weight vest and do body weight style movements. Squats, lunges, single leg squats, box steps, etc. If the weight is too light then try to maximize the reps and minimize the rest time so you still find an intensity that supports an anaerobic response by the body.

    The best approach would be to find a functional physical therapist that actually does weight lifting themselves. You can consult with them on how to work around the specific injury while you maintain a program.
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