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  1. #1
    Registered User trynuhBfit's Avatar
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    Can anyone help?

    What’s up I’m new to this whole scene but I’d thought I’d reach out.

    I am 19 years old 215lbs 5’11’ (very broad shoulders that hide most of my fat)

    I have always ate whatever I wanted and with college and the tail end of my high school life, I started drinking beers which did not help and it slowly caught up to me. My biological father is very fit but I have never had a person around to teach me what to eat or how to gain muscle. I was on the track and field team in high school and worked out with their training regimen which helped me stay at a normal weight but freshman year of college I was struggling mentally and resorted to dominos and Uber eats for most of my meals, not wanting to go out.

    Recently (start of quarantine/ march) I have been looking into my health a lot more due to a healthy lifestyle change project I had in school. This really made me start looking at my diet which is something I did not do that I realized most people do. I have always been good at goal setting and I have really stuck to trying to get fit. My friends are all super fit and support me so I am definitely in a good place. Since then I have been lifting everyday as I have 20 pound dumbbells and resistance bands and I also do body weight exercises. I also have a rowing machine that I use and a pool that I swim in for cardio or I bike. I am getting a bench from my friend in a week. For the first couple months I just stuck to lifting and improving my reps for workouts. I took some protein and changed my diet to home cooked meals that include veggies and fruits, a lot less carbs and more meat. I tend to eat once or twice a day never eat sweets or anything. I have been eating less based on my BMR and I started to lose about 10 pounds in a couple months but I could tell I was gaining a lot of muscle probably because there was none before.

    Recently I been doing a lot cardio and focusing on my diet more. I guess my question for anyone would be what sort of fitness plan is best for me? My metabolism is slower than most people and I have never eaten too much it’s just the things I ate were mostly junk food (Mac and cheese, chipotle, McDonald’s, Wendy’s, etc). I am committed to making meals at home and have been putting in the time to workout and eat right but I really don’t know what to do to maximize my training. Ideally I would want to reach 180 pounds but I don’t know what to follow or where to look. All of my friends have been lean their whole lives and are now stuffing food down their mouths to gain weight while we workout but I can tell my body type needs a different approach.

    Any suggestions of a diet, workout routine to follow is much appreciated. I was recently looking through supplements like ZMA and other things but realized I didn’t need those I just need to stick to a plan but I don’t know how to make one. I feel like I’ve finally put myself in the right mindset to make progress I just need some guidance.
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  2. #2
    Registered User AlexSays's Avatar
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    Nutrition: If you are really committed to preparing your own food my biggest suggestion would be to make sure you are tracking your calories, weighing your food and making sure you are being consistent as time goes on. My second suggestion would always be to cook things you enjoy making and things you enjoy eating. More nutritionally dense, protein-rich foods will certainly keep you fuller so I would lean more that way. But in reality eat what you want, just in moderation. If it works for you then go for it but I will say there is NO fat loss advantage to reducing your carbs except perhaps to replace them with more filling protein or fibrous foods. Making sure you enjoy what you're eating and fitting in treats to your calories means you wont fall into the fable of 'cheat days' and your adherence to your lifestyle will be much higher. If you want a steak and fries have it, just make sure you work the rest of your calories around it. If you have 100 cals left in an evening have a bloody chocolate bar instead of an apple if you want to. Just use your common sense and don't take this to extremes that leave you starving because you've blown most of your calorie allowance on crappy food.

    Workout: if your goal is your physique find a beginners lifting program on the exercise program forum and stick to that, following the progression. Cardio (in my personal opinion) is a waste of time unless you enjoy it and/or are trying to improve your cardiovascular fitness. The amount of calories it burns is so minimal (Ie you'd have to run for a solid half hour just to burn off something like a single chocolate muffin) compared to just adjusting your eating patterns that it wont give you much of an edge, in the long term it often just makes you hungrier. Lifting and diet alone is enough to lose any amount of weight you need and give you a great physique in the long term.

    Hope this helps
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  3. #3
    Registered User trynuhBfit's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by AlexSays View Post
    Nutrition: If you are really committed to preparing your own food my biggest suggestion would be to make sure you are tracking your calories, weighing your food and making sure you are being consistent as time goes on. My second suggestion would always be to cook things you enjoy making and things you enjoy eating. More nutritionally dense, protein-rich foods will certainly keep you fuller so I would lean more that way. But in reality eat what you want, just in moderation. If it works for you then go for it but I will say there is NO fat loss advantage to reducing your carbs except perhaps to replace them with more filling protein or fibrous foods. Making sure you enjoy what you're eating and fitting in treats to your calories means you wont fall into the fable of 'cheat days' and your adherence to your lifestyle will be much higher. If you want a steak and fries have it, just make sure you work the rest of your calories around it. If you have 100 cals left in an evening have a bloody chocolate bar instead of an apple if you want to. Just use your common sense and don't take this to extremes that leave you starving because you've blown most of your calorie allowance on crappy food.

    Workout: if your goal is your physique find a beginners lifting program on the exercise program forum and stick to that, following the progression. Cardio (in my personal opinion) is a waste of time unless you enjoy it and/or are trying to improve your cardiovascular fitness. The amount of calories it burns is so minimal (Ie you'd have to run for a solid half hour just to burn off something like a single chocolate muffin) compared to just adjusting your eating patterns that it wont give you much of an edge, in the long term it often just makes you hungrier. Lifting and diet alone is enough to lose any amount of weight you need and give you a great physique in the long term.

    Hope this helps

    This actually does help a lot thank you,

    Is eating more meals throughout the day important as right now I have a small lunch and then have most of my calories at night for dinner and then workout late night. Is being in a calorie deficit the most important aspect or does my lack of meals throughout the day hinder my progress meal wise?
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  4. #4
    Registered User AlexSays's Avatar
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    Some solid gold advice:

    When you eat, how often etc etc. does not make the slightest bit of long term, noticeable difference. The important thing is that you eat in a pattern that suits you and your hunger signals. If you find it easier to eat that way then do it.

    Things like intermittent fasting, 6 meals per day, protein straight after workout, not eating carbs after 6pm, fasted cardio in the morning all exist to sell something. There are no proven scientific long term fat loss benefits to any of them no matter what devised evidence they try and throw at you. The only advantage any single one has over the other is whether it suits YOU more. For instance when I'm losing fat I find intermittent fasting (18 hours off, 6 hours on) more convenient because I prefer to eat the larger part of my calories close together. But again, and I cannot stress this enough, it does not make fat loss any more efficient or any more rapid, it just helps me adhere better.

    It is the energy equation, calories in vs calories out. If you under eat by 500 calories it is physically impossible to lose more than that energy density's worth in weight, it can't happen. Once you understand this you realise it's absurd to think that altering the macro/micro makeup, timing or other features of those calories would somehow result in more weight loss. The only important point is to maintain a good dose of protein. This (along with lifting) will aid you in ensuring that the 'weight' lost is actually fat as opposed to muscle mass.
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  5. #5
    Registered User Luclin999's Avatar
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    You have to be willing to learn how to weight/measure and log literally everything that goes into your mouth in order to re-learn concepts like "proper portion size", "Macro nutrient values", and calorie amounts for what you are eating each day and understand that while no food is essentially "forbidden" that there are some foods which are a lot better for you to eat than others.

    Becoming more active is also critical in re-training yourself into becoming a healthier, leaner person. You will also need to find ways to stress whatever muscle that you do have under the fat in order to cause your body to prioritize pulling calories from your fat stores while in a prolonged calorie deficit rather than breaking down lean mass. Weight training is optimal for this, however if you do not currently have access to real weights or a full gym, even a calisthenic program of bodyweight exercises (Squats, pushups, Etc.) added to the limited equipment that you have is better than doing nothing at all to stress your body.

    Also, at 5'11" and 180 pounds and with no real weight training experience, you will probably still have quite a bit of fat on your frame. Everyone underestimates the amount of fat that they are carrying at first. A more realistic number to aim for to be "lean" will likely be 165 pounds.

    Understand that at your body fat levels, this process when done right will likely take close to a year and that even after the fat is gone that if you want to keep from simply re-gaining is all back again that you will still have to continue with many of the habits and eating patterns that you developed to lose the fat for the rest of your life.
    ~ Like Tae-Kwon-Leap, my goals are not a path to a door, but a road leading forever towards the horizon.
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