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  1. #1
    Registered User kusok's Avatar
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    Are Cholesterol and blood sugar connected?

    Is there a relationship between high cholesterol and high blood sugar? As in does one influence the other? Do they go hand in hand? Or do people tend to have both when they are simply fat or perhaps genetically predisposed? Or are they totally unrelated and don’t have any effect on one another?
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    Registered User hurley4health's Avatar
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    Yes....Poor glucose metabolism leads to inflammation, which directly hampers organ health, especially the liver. The liver regulates and manufactures cholesterol. If its job is hindered, cholesterol does not get metabolized properly.
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    Registered User rtpmarine's Avatar
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    Cholesterol and glycemia are linked by virtue of the fact that they both represent available substrate. Cholesterol represents how much fat is available and glycemia represents how much glucose is available.

    When the body has elevated fatty acids OR elevated glucose, it typically can deal with whichever one is elevated. It preferentially enforces, via hormones, the use of the elevated one over the non-elevated one.

    When the body has elevated fatty acids AND elevated glucose, it has a harder time disposing of all the available substrate and so it turns to a pressure release valve: triglyceride synthesis. This is the key link between cholesterol and glycemia. A triglyceride is formed by combining three fatty acids ("tri-") with a glycerol backbone ("-glyceride"). This combination of fat- and sugar-byproducts is much more stable than the fatty acids or glucose are by themselves, so it can be safely packaged away within adipose tissue for future use.

    Hypertriglyceridemia (high levels of triglycerides in the blood) represents a breakdown in the body's ability to balance fat and carbohydrate metabolism. It is a hallmark of Metabolic Syndrome. Both genetics and environmental factors can lead to this disorder.

    As I've said to you in other threads, I think you need to look into the ratio of Triglycerides to HDL-Cholesterol. This ratio is extremely important to understand. It represents how well your metabolism is handling the demand that you're putting on it. Your TG/HDL ratio is not bad. It's not great, but certainly not as bad as your glycemia or LDL-Cholesterol would have you believe.
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