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  1. #1
    Registered User RandyArmand's Avatar
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    The Importance Of Flexibility Training

    As we age, physical wear and tear is inevitable. However, I am convinced that many of the physical problems we face with age can be prevented or delayed with the right knowledge, nutrition, and exercise protocol. One such protocol that is commonly neglected is flexibility training.

    When we develop a muscular imbalance, undue stress is placed upon our muscles and joints. Without remedy, this imbalance can become permanent as our skeletal system remodels over time. That old man blames his age for his hunched over posture, however, his posture is probably the result of a tight hip flexor complex and weakened gluteal muscles - Of course, there are exceptions to this such as past injury.

    When a muscle becomes overactive, or tight, the neural drive to that muscle's antagonist is dampened. Therefore, the antagonist is no longer capable of functioning properly. This is known as Altered Reciprocal Inhibition.

    In theory, this can prevent you from reaching your potential in resistance training. For example, a tight hip flexor complex can cause the gluteals to weaken. This is known as "Dead Butt Syndrome." Weakened glutes can hinder your progress in back squats, deadlifts, and etcetera.

    Altered Reciprocal Inhibition can further lead to Synergistic Dominance. This is when Synergistic Muscles attempt to take over the role of the weakened / underactive muscle. Example: Hamstrings attempting to take over the role of the weakened gluteal muscles. This can lead to injury.

    My Personal Story: I was injured in a work related incident in December 2018. I was forced to lay around during the first 3 months of recovery. In that short amount of time I could feel my muscles growing tight. I began to get body aches I'd never experienced before. Upon being cleared by my doctor, I committed to a flexibility routine. Those aches and pains have since gone away. Upon focusing on the flexibility of my hip flexors, I also noticed a random increase in my squat numbers.
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  2. #2
    Roman Nose dday39's Avatar
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    well....

    I don't believe there needs to be any priority on flexibility training. However, just lifting weights can make you a stiff mess if you aren't typically an active person.

    I like to use golf as an example. People falsely believe that gaining muscle will restrict the golf swing causing a loss of power. In reality, if you continue regular golf activities and add strength training, you may see an increase in power and range of motion, not a loss.
    Goals:

    1.5 bw Bench
    2.0+ bw Squat
    2.5 bw Deadlift
    Gain 20 lbs
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  3. #3
    Registered User RandyArmand's Avatar
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    I see what you're saying. Let me continue upon the scenario of the golfer.

    On his down time, think of the amount of time he may spend looking down at his phone. In doing so, he is placing his neck in a flexed position for a prolonged period of time. Over the long term, this can cause the neck flexors to become overactive and the neck extensors to become underactive. Hence, he now has a muscular imbalance that he probably isn't even aware of.

    I believe that each of us, to some extent, has some sort of muscular imbalance. The imbalance we develop is largely determined by the activity we choose to participate in during our down time. I am a Security Guard at a Casino. One of my main duties is simply to watch people. I've noticed that most people who come through, including those who appear to be in shape, have the same three postural distortion syndromes: Upper Crossed Syndrome, Lower Crossed Syndrome, and Pronation Distortion Syndrome.

    Personally, I had externally rotated feet. I thought this was hereditary / normal for the longest time. I then learned that this was due to a muscular imbalance: Tight Calves and a weak Anterior Tibialis. I have since remedied this, and my feet now remain straight.
    Last edited by RandyArmand; 01-02-2020 at 12:53 PM.
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