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  1. #31
    Registered User WakingOp's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dazitmayn View Post
    https://medium.com/@SandCResearch/do...h-7859e0c4adfd

    "Firstly, while most research has shown that central nervous system fatigue after strength training is fairly short-lived, it is certainly present in the 30 minutes after a workout. Moreover, it is also present within a workout, at least once a certain amount of volume has been accomplished, although it probably decays exponentially after each set. Therefore, using shorter rest periods makes it more likely that we will commence a subsequent set while central nervous system fatigue is still present. This will prevent us reaching full motor unit recruitment in that next set."
    Yeah. This. I read something along the same lines from nuckols. This may have been one of his sources
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