Reply
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Registered User EliKoehn's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2019
    Age: 49
    Posts: 10
    Rep Power: 0
    EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50) EliKoehn will become famous soon enough. (+50)
    EliKoehn is offline

    Underappreciated Curls

    Surely all of us have either heard or participated in the mockery of those who curl in the squat rack, or who claim to be strong when their curl would increase their laughable powerlifting total if they could substitute it for one of the Big Three. While a solid foundation of strength indeed lies elsewhere and there is a lot of validity to that criticism, for a while now I've nevertheless had a growing impression that curling as a measure of strength, and the biceps as an aspect of physique, get made fun of too often and don't get enough priority and attention.

    What is not valid about the strength you can claim to have by curling a certain weight? Yes, if your curl and your squat are neck and neck, you have some serious imbalances that you need to correct before trying to impress people with how much your biceps can lift, but that doesn't necessitate that this exercise should not be taken seriously, as I so often see. It is a smaller muscle, and the amount of weight that you are going to lift is going to be far less than that of a major compound exercise, but that makes it just as respectable, in relative terms: what you can do with a smaller muscle working by itself. It is also notable that, in using the bench, squat and deadlift as a measure of full body strength, the most seriously neglected muscle among them are the biceps! So it is amusing that these three lifts get complete respect nearly at all times, but talking about a curl is more often than not an invitation for insult, even if your other lifts are solid.

    In terms of physique, large and imposing biceps are among the greatest tokens of an enviable and classic build, yet somehow training for that is ridiculed as "beach work" and those who strive for it often have their masculinity and worth in the gym insulted. That strikes me as unreasonable and misguided. Many are going to disagree with me on this, that the desirable male physique is more prominent in the upper body, and that powerful arms are one of the most significant factors of this, complimented heavily by the size and definition of the biceps. With full respect for the squat and its difficulty, there does seem to be a "cult of legs" (for lack of a better term) in today's gym culture, which gives them an undue amount of focus to the chagrin of everything else, particularly the curl and the emphasis on developing the biceps.

    This general idea has been nagging me lately, and it doesn't look like there's a specifically similar thread already, so I thought it good start a thread.

    What do you all think?
    It says I am 49, but I am 23.
    Reply With Quote

  2. #2
    Registered User etet1919's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2018
    Posts: 1,962
    Rep Power: 16950
    etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) etet1919 is a splendid one to behold. (+10000)
    etet1919 is offline
    I can't speak for the men that post here, but in all the years (and gyms) I've been training in, all the guys do curls...and so do all the women. Developed and defined biceps have always been a masculine symbol of strength and sexiness! This hasn't changed And women want guns now too

    But I'm sure you'd agree compound lifts like BB squats, deadlifts, bench and OV delt presses are more beneficial to developing overall muscle mass and/or strength. These lifts are a major focus in every professionally designed program here!

    But that doesn't mean strengthening your arms are any less important!
    "A Winner is a Dreamer Who Never Gives Up" --- Nelson Mandela

    " I don't know my BF%...and I don't care. All I know is, I'm healthy"--- Elisa (me)
    Reply With Quote

  3. #3
    Registered User ampire's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2011
    Age: 33
    Posts: 984
    Rep Power: 2761
    ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500) ampire is a glorious beacon of knowledge. (+2500)
    ampire is offline
    In my experience, doing hammer curl is useful for injury prevention in the forearm and elbow. Also if you are into calisthenics and are fairly lightweight, getting a strong barbell curl can help a lot with any bar exercise such as pullups, muscleups, etc. I think people mock curls because it is a form of internet elitism over the random people going in and out of the gym and because a lot of beginners stereotypically focus purely on the curl and benchpress, neglecting rows, deadlifts, squats, and other exercises.
    Reply With Quote

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts