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  1. #1
    chicano feel TheDesertFox's Avatar
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    Being a PT at Life Time fitness and/or Golds Gym

    Hi y'all, I've been recently trying to get a job as a personal trainer. I have the CSCS and ACSM-EPC certifications and have a good amount of knowledge in regards to program design according to the client's needs and current limitations. I've just recently been interviewed by a Life Time Fitness gym in my area, but I have yet to receive a call back for the practical exam. I also have an interview with one of the best and biggest Golds gym in my area. I am looking forward to seeing where all of this takes me, as I am eager to put my skills and knowledge to work.

    However, if I am hired, this would be the first time that I ever work as a PT as part of a big chain/franchise-owned gym. I would like to ask anyone that has had any experience working as a PT in any of these two gyms about the general every-day duties that may be assigned to me. What does a "normal" or "average" day as a PT consists of from clock-in to clock-out?

    Lastly, I've tried to do some research in regards to what constitutes a "practical exam", but I have not yet been able to find what exactly it entails or what the general sequence of procedures is. Could someone be kind enough to provide me with some insight on this as well?


    Will rep you for insight/advice.
    Last edited by TheDesertFox; 08-25-2019 at 09:58 AM.
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  2. #2
    husband, father, trainer KyleAaron's Avatar
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    I've no idea about those particular chains. But they do not differ much except in branding - it's Coke and Pepsi. In general, whatever the official job description, it's a good idea for you to be on the gym floor caring and cleaning. Go around wiping dust off treadmills, putting WD-40 on cable machines, taking the 14x 20kg plates someone left on the leg press, and so on. And while doing so, talk to people. Decide which hours you want to work, and until those hours are filled with PT clients, use those hours to care and clean.

    Caring and cleaning helps member retention. The 3 things people cite when quitting a gym are: friendliness of staff, cleanliness of the facilities, and overcrowding. You as a trainer control the first 2. If they stay as members that helps the gym's bottom line (cheaper to keep a member than sign one up), and people who have been training for a while on their own and have got nowhere are more likely to ask for personal training than people who just started, "I'll try it on my own for a while." By caring and cleaning, you will meet lots of gym members, and some of them will want to give you money for personal training.

    Typically chain gyms will have 1-3 intro sessions for new members. In a wage-paying gym the staff will be paid for these, in a rental gym this will be presented to members as "3 free PT sessions!" and to staff as "your chance to get a PT client!" and you won't be paid for them, except perhaps reduced rent.

    For most trainers, the gym floor is a better source of new clients than those intro sessions.

    A "practical exam" will be simply their giving you a staff member who plays the role of a gym newbie. They'll be looking to see your personal and training skills: demonstrate your competence, build trust and rapport.
    "A fox has many tricks, a porcupine has only one trick - but a very good one."
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