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  1. #1
    Registered User bobby55's Avatar
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    Inhibited muscle training.

    Hi,

    Ive been trying to diagnose lower back problems for years (very common, and a million possible causes)after getting screwd around by physiotherapist("oh your elbow hurts,dont need to hear anything else now,lets do an infrared massage for next hour, come back next week and pay me again for a fancy massage") i went on a knowledge quest, and i found that i have anterior pelvic tilt and rounded shoulders from my earlier years as a gamer teen, and when i started lifting, i was using the wrong muscles.

    so in the process of correcting this, i found some fantastic stretches/exercisethat target my inhibited muscles. at first i would fatigue out at very low weights and reps, i believe this was CNS fatigue. at this point ive progressed to light/medium weight and moderate reps. i can feel the changes all over, how i stand, how i walk, how i move, its all getting better.

    i believe i have reached the stage where those muscles are now also mechanically failing, and i have to increase my recovery time. my question is this, should i treat these muscles (like inhibited glutes) just like any other muscle and work them out the same?

    I'm fatigued to the point that i cant do my next workout with the same weights without struggling like hell, or taking an extra 3+ days to recover with light exercise.

    note: i am actively using those inhibited muscles to force myself into proper posture/motion whenver i can (just walking around i squeeze my glutes and lower abs in order to relax the back,hamstrings and hip flexors).
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    Registered User DCSpartan's Avatar
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    I think you should go see a good athletic trainer who can help with some ofthese mobility issues. At the end of the day, sounds like you have a weak core that needs to be strengthened, not CNS fatigue or muscle "inhibition" - some of that stuff is in your mind.
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    Registered User Sherniee's Avatar
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    OP, diagnosis should be done by a sports med, not a physiotherapist, just FYI. Though the physio very often operates in the same facility under the sports med, they aren't trained to diagnose you.
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    Registered User bobby55's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by DCSpartan View Post
    I think you should go see a good athletic trainer who can help with some ofthese mobility issues. At the end of the day, sounds like you have a weak core that needs to be strengthened, not CNS fatigue or muscle "inhibition" - some of that stuff is in your mind.
    I've spent alot of time trying to figure out my body. One of the causes of APT is weak core, nothing new there, also not the full story.

    To fully explain how I got to my conclusion would take pages, but short answer is I found some isolation exercises for things like glute medius, and at first I was able to do maybe 3 reps, and the muscle would feel like it about to go on fire. I'm at ,20 now and it's increasing substantially each week.

    Why do you recommend and "athletic trainer" vs a physiotherapist or a sports med?

    Originally Posted by Sherniee View Post
    OP, diagnosis should be done by a sports med, not a physiotherapist, just FYI. Though the physio very often operates in the same facility under the sports med, they aren't trained to diagnose you.
    So that makes sense, I thought physiotherapist is a person who applied sports medicine. Maybe that's why they are garbage for real issues.

    How do I make sure I see a sports medicine doctor, just look for the title instead of physiotherapist?
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    Registered User DCSpartan's Avatar
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    SO you didnt work a muscle, started to work it, and it got stronger over time.

    Kid, this is called "normal". But you diagnose yourself however you want.
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    Registered User Sherniee's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by bobby55 View Post
    So that makes sense, I thought physiotherapist is a person who applied sports medicine. Maybe that's why they are garbage for real issues.

    How do I make sure I see a sports medicine doctor, just look for the title instead of physiotherapist?
    A Dr. in a sports med clinic will diagnose you. He will then refer you to physio IF appropriate. As in there are other treatment outcomes, like orthopedic referral, etc. By going to a physio directly you are self-diagnosing and skipping the first step.

    when i started lifting, i was using the wrong muscles.
    Ok look, I'm going to take a wild stab here and say your problems aren't really fires that you need to put out. You just have weak areas and they will be brought up through appropriate diet & resistance training.

    You say you are using the "wrong muscles", so you have no pain, grinding, impingement, whatever. You just don't feel strong and you don't like it. If you have pain or whatever then go see a sports med.

    I.E. don't go to a professional saying you don't feel like you use the right muscles when you lift. What the guy above me said.
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