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    Unregistered User moerecon's Avatar
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    How to fix forward lean before deadlifts?

    Recently switched to sumo style after 2-3 years of conventional deadlifting, I find there's significantly less lower back pain and the movement's overall just less awkward. I think it's because of my proportion lengths.

    But I've noticed that before deadlifting, whether conventional or sumo, I tend to lean forward before the pull. How can I fix this? Is it due to weak glutes? There's no pain, but I think it's something that needs to be fixed.

    https://imgur.com/a/r8sej8j

    Showed multiple weights down to 135 to show that it's not because the weight is too heavy (the link has multiple videos). Might be my leverages? It's really hard to simply "sit back"

    Let me know what you think. Thanks
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    Registered User vristang's Avatar
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    You look to be in pretty good position to me...
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    your toes are pointed to forward making your knees start in a position forward of the toes
    get in a position that completely stacks foot, shin, knee in a line and then see how it goes
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    Registered User PowerBella's Avatar
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    The main problem I see is that you are leaning too far forward BEFORE you start the lift. Your shoulders should be sitting right over top of the middle of your feet, and they're not. So it's not the actual lift that is causing the issue... which is actually a good thing, because it means if you fix your starting position, you should be good to go.

    The next thing I see is that BECAUSE of you leaning too far forward before the lift, you aren't able to load your hamstrings nearly enough to perform the movement well when you DO start the lift (remember that the deadlift primarily relies on the hammies and glutes). I think this is mainly due to your stance. Point your toes out at a wider angle (maybe even widen your stance by an inch if you need to), which will in turn open up your hip angle so you can get your butt and hamstrings down a little further before starting the lift. This will actually also help to keep your shoulders in a more upright position as well (since your shoulders will follow the angle of your hips and come back more) which will prevent that forward lean.

    I know you said that since switching over, you have less lower back pain... But look at the video you posted very carefully. Your lower back (right before it meets your butt), is actually slightly rounded and this gets worse mid-lift. If you keep lifting like this, you WILL encounter back pain again. You also said this switch was recent, right? I think you should definitely take some time lifting lighter weight and playing around with what works best for you in terms of stances and grip. For some people (like myself), a grip that is even just slightly too wide puts the shoulders out of position since a wider grip actually shortens the distance between the bar and your shoulders, meaning you need to lean down further to grab the bar. Small things like that matter big time! Find what works for your anatomy.

    And also remember the general order of the basics:
    - load/engage the hamstrings & "pack" your back. If your hammies aren't loaded, don't even bother trying to lift. Fix your stance and try again.
    - drive with your heels to hinge your hips. Putting a bit of mental focus on your heels as you start to drive up will help make you "sit back".
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