Reply
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Registered User reyesalf's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2017
    Age: 17
    Posts: 38
    Rep Power: 0
    reyesalf is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    reyesalf is offline

    Boxing and bodybuilding

    Ive started boxing recently and Im looking to incorporate some hypertrophy work to help my physique. Im looking to compete as an amateur in boxing and will focus on boxing more once i have a fight coming near. Was just wondering if this routine would cause overtraining.

    Ill be using a PHUL routine

    Monday- Boxing
    Tuesday- Upper power
    Wednesday- Lower power
    Thursday- Boxing
    Friday-Upper hypertrophy
    Saturday- AM boxing and PM lower hypertrophy
    Sunday- Active rest ( light cardio and footwork drills, shadowboxing, stretching)

    FYI im not looking for a big bulky physique but rather an athletic look with not too much muscle.
    Reply With Quote

  2. #2
    Registered User GFIT2019's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2019
    Posts: 91
    Rep Power: 112
    GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50) GFIT2019 will become famous soon enough. (+50)
    GFIT2019 is offline
    It depends on the volume and intensity of your workouts.

    If you will feel overtrained or fatigued, then try to lower the volume or switch to another workout program.

    For example, instead of having 4 gym sessions a week reduce them to 2, but do 2 full body workouts instead, so you will still keep the frequency of hitting a muscle group twice a week.
    Goals:

    BP 100 kg for 1 rep [100/100] -> DONE
    BP 100 kg for 5 reps [85/100]
    OHP 60 kg for 5 reps [47.5/60]

    Bench Press Log: https://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=177199831

    YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsKp3HvjrxjIUIMLp0JwcbQ
    Reply With Quote

  3. #3
    Registered User reyesalf's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2017
    Age: 17
    Posts: 38
    Rep Power: 0
    reyesalf is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    reyesalf is offline
    Alright, ill test if it would be too much for me. Thanks!
    Reply With Quote

  4. #4
    Registered User climbrunlift's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2019
    Age: 50
    Posts: 21
    Rep Power: 0
    climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000) climbrunlift is just really nice. (+1000)
    climbrunlift is offline
    I have one word for you: calisthenics. This is something I have a lot of experience with. I'm a former boxer, and calisthenics is by far the best type of resistance training you can incorporate into your routine if you are focused on any type of martial arts. I used to use gymnastic rings and do an upper body routine on those. You don't have to do rings training but I find it highly beneficial for working your stabilizing muscles. Pushups, pullups, etc will do just fine too. For legs there are many options: air squats and pistol squats are the easiest. Lunges, burpees, frog jumps all work too. I run/hike as well which also helps with leg strength/endurance. Calisthenics is the perfect training to supplement boxing or martial arts because it builds both strength and endurance along with increasing your power:weight ratio. I think calisthenics also help to keep you lean, I'm not sure how or why but that's always been my experience.

    Here's the link for the rings routine I liked is here on bodybuilding. It's called "Built Like A Gymnast: Pack on Muscle with the Gymnastic Rings by Ryan Hurst. I'd post the link but I don't have enough rep yet.

    As for other calisthenics routines, just google them. Neila Ray has some great stuff as well as Darebee workouts. I cannot emphasize this enough: bodyweight training is the best type of resistance training for a boxer to utilize. If I were you I'd start with running every morning, then later that day when your energy is up do a calisthenics workout. I did the same workout (Ryan Hurst's) every single day. You can do these workouts 5 days a week or potentially more, they don't require as much recovery as traditional weightlifting.

    Alot of bros will tell you otherwise but high volume high intensity calisthenics is one of the best things you can do for hypertrophy. Just google olympic gymnasts and see what their physiques look like. They are bigger than alot of natural bodybuilders.
    Last edited by climbrunlift; 06-24-2019 at 04:48 PM.
    Reply With Quote

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts