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  1. #1
    Registered User konrad1198's Avatar
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    Personal trainer with degree in physical therapy

    I'm currently a sophomore pursuing a dual-degree in Biology/Physical Therapy. My dream is to have an occupation similar to that of Jeff Cavaliere's from Athlean-X. He seems to be both a physical therapist but also trains athletes/clients. Is it possible with my degree, along with personal training certification, to be able to do both these things as part of my job?
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    Registered User Garage Rat's Avatar
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    That's gold if you achieve it.
    You will be able to demand a higher fee for training than regular trainers because you've added value to yourself with a degree in PT.
    You could do both but you wouldn't be able devote 100% to both.
    What pays more?
    It seems a PT job would be regular 9-5 hours where a trainer could be anywhere say 5am to 10pm.
    A bit to think about but for sure get your physical therapy degree.
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    Registered User grubman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by konrad1198 View Post
    My dream is to have an occupation similar to that of Jeff Cavaliere's from Athlean-X. He seems to be both a physical therapist but also trains athletes/clients.
    I love Jeff Cavalier. However, what you need to realize is that in addition to what you mentioned, Jeff is a Youtuber, sells programs, and sells supplements. Successful Youtubers can pull a 6 digit salary just from a good channel...add the program and supplement sales and Jeff is making a great living. This, and his past job experience has allowed him to work with some high profile clients. I doubt if he trains many (or any) other people than a handful of these guys (and Jessie) and probably not on a regular basis.

    I'm getting ready to retire from my first career and am looking into second careers (something I enjoy, since I'll have a pension from my first career). I looked into Physical Therapy. At my age, I don't have the time and patience to invest in the education, but on it's own it seems like a pretty lucrative and fulfilling career. I can't imagine you'll have time to do MORE than hold down a job doing that, unless you are a real go-getter with no life outside work...but I'm sure if you dedicate yourself to the (primary) job, it could certainly open doors to further career options and opportunities.

    But...if you were my kid, I'd advice on keeping the work and the hobby separate until you've established yourself in the primary field first. MHO
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  4. #4
    Learn and Lift Daemonium's Avatar
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    If you actually finish PT and become a registered physical therapist, I would focus on that. You'll make a lot more than you would as a personal trainer, unless you've got a huge client base and are running it out of somewhere that is charging you very little or nothing for using their space. If you're just a personal trainer at a typical commercial gym, it won't be close. The job you're looking for is either going to really hard to find (i.e. you'll have to look around/know a lot of people to eventually find something like that), or you'll have to start your own business.

    So yeah. Physical therapy would be the best place to start.
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    Also consider your desired work environment and conditions. The type of people, office/open space, schedule and client/patient relationships will be starkly different. Physical therapists work differently than personal trainers.
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    Registered User liamgt's Avatar
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    Jeff's stuff is great and as has been said already he puts all his effort into you tube as his main traffic source. I've met Jeff as we have the same mentor and he is doing over 7 figures a year from his programs and supplements, but it wasn't an overnight success. he puts a lot of effort in his videos on you tube and building a fan base. Its a long slog before you will get any payback on this but definitely can be done.
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