Reply
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4
Results 91 to 104 of 104
  1. #91
    INDUSTRY INSIDER WillBrink's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2002
    Location: United States
    Posts: 13,844
    Rep Power: 88929
    WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000)
    WillBrink is offline
    Does stevia supercharge up your whey?

    Many people are concerned about synthetic sweeteners such as Sucralose and Acesulfame potassium and prefer to use whey products sweetened with stevia. While there’s little data that’s a safer approach per se, a recent study suggests stevia may be additive to whey for impacting muscle mass, fat mass, and markers for increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Before you get too excited, this was a rat study, so the effect needs to be reproduced in humans vs red eyed squeaky rodents. Still, if you’re using whey that’s also using stevia for a flavoring/sweetening agent, there’s at least a possibility the stevia’s having an additive effect to the whey you’re ingesting. While stevia appears quite safe, although there’s not much for long term studies. There’s also an issue of what’s found in the whole leaf vs the highly processed stevia products sold as sugar replacements which requires more research.

    What’s the mechanism for how stevia supercharges the effects of whey? That’s not altogether clear at this time, but stevia does contain a number of bio-active compounds. The full paper linked below does discuss nutrients and other bioactive compounds found to have antimicrobial, antioxidant, antidiabetic, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory properties associated with the consumption of the leaf extracts of this plant. However, no specific compound or mechanism was identified in this study:

    Whey protein sweetened with Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (Bert.) increases mitochondrial biogenesis markers in the skeletal muscle of resistance-trained rats. Nutrition & Metabolism volume 16, Article number: 65 (2019)
    Background

    A combination of resistance training and whey protein supplementation is a common practice among athletes and recreational exercisers to enhance muscle growth and strength. Although their safety as food additives is controversial, artificial sweeteners are present in whey protein supplements. Thus, natural sweeteners extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana are a potential alternative, due to their safety and health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein sweetened with S. rebaudiana on physical performance and mitochondrial biogenesis markers in the skeletal muscle of resistance-trained rats.
    Methods

    Forty male Wistar rats were distributed into four groups: sedentary rats, trained rats, trained rats receiving whey protein and trained rats receiving whey protein sweetened with S. rebaudiana leaf extracts. Resistance training was performed by climbing a ladder 5 days per week, during 8-weeks. The training sessions consisted of four climbs carrying a load of 50, 75, 90, and 100% of the maximum load-carrying capacity which we determined before by performing a maximum load-carrying test for each animal. After this period, we collected plasma and tissues samples to evaluate biochemical, histological and molecular (western blot) parameters in these rats.
    Results

    Dietary supplementation with whey protein sweetened with S. rebaudiana significantly enhanced the maximum load-carrying capacity of resistance-trained rats, compared with non-sweetened whey protein supplementation. This enhanced physical performance was accompanied by an increase in the weight of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle pads. Although the muscle pad of the biceps brachii was not altered, we observed a significant increase in PGC-1α expression, which was followed by a similar pattern in TFAM protein expression, two important mitochondrial biogenesis markers. In addition, a higher level of AMPK phosphorylation was observed in these resistance-trained rats. Finally, supplementation with whey protein sweetened with S. rebaudiana also induced a significant decrease in retroperitoneal adipocyte diameter and an increase in the weight of brown adipose tissue pads in resistance-trained rats.
    Conclusion

    The addition of Stevia rebaudiana leaf extracts to whey protein appears to be a potential strategy for those who want to increase muscular mass and strength and also improve mitochondrial function. This strategy may be useful for both athletes and patients with metabolic disorders, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.
    BrinkZone, Where Bro-Science Got Rabies and Died!

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Check out my BrinkZone mini site on BB.com at:

    www.bodybuilding.com/fun/willbrink.htm

    => President and Founder of Shaved head with goatee Crew
    => Science over bro science Crew
    Reply With Quote

  2. #92
    Registered User adikam11's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2019
    Age: 50
    Posts: 25
    Rep Power: 0
    adikam11 is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    adikam11 is offline
    Thanks You. That was the great post though.
    Reply With Quote

  3. #93
    Registered User Jeremy19969's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2019
    Age: 50
    Posts: 26
    Rep Power: 0
    Jeremy19969 is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    Jeremy19969 is offline
    Guy knows what he is talking about!
    Reply With Quote

  4. #94
    Registered User Jowel84's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2019
    Age: 50
    Posts: 3
    Rep Power: 0
    Jowel84 is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    Jowel84 is offline
    Hi, I have a question about whey. I am in my 1st year of body building, and i read a lot about food schedule's. A lot of people seem to use whey as a 'meal' during the day. But I'm wondering: why take a fast protein, and not a slower one like casein? I would reason that casein would be better, because it spreads more during the day in stead of whey.

    I would love to hear your opinion on this, so I can adjust my food schedule the right way. Many thanks in advance!
    Reply With Quote

  5. #95
    INDUSTRY INSIDER WillBrink's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2002
    Location: United States
    Posts: 13,844
    Rep Power: 88929
    WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000)
    WillBrink is offline
    Originally Posted by Jowel84 View Post
    Hi, I have a question about whey. I am in my 1st year of body building, and i read a lot about food schedule's. A lot of people seem to use whey as a 'meal' during the day. But I'm wondering: why take a fast protein, and not a slower one like casein? I would reason that casein would be better, because it spreads more during the day in stead of whey.

    I would love to hear your opinion on this, so I can adjust my food schedule the right way. Many thanks in advance!

    If you know you're not going to eat for a long time, casien may be the better choice for that, which is why some will eat some cottage cheese and such before bed. Most people eat on a regular schedule, and whey does have various unique benefits and effects (tons of studies posted in this thread...), so whey is generally the go to protein supplement.
    BrinkZone, Where Bro-Science Got Rabies and Died!

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Check out my BrinkZone mini site on BB.com at:

    www.bodybuilding.com/fun/willbrink.htm

    => President and Founder of Shaved head with goatee Crew
    => Science over bro science Crew
    Reply With Quote

  6. #96
    Registered User Jowel84's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2019
    Age: 50
    Posts: 3
    Rep Power: 0
    Jowel84 is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    Jowel84 is offline
    Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    If you know you're not going to eat for a long time, casien may be the better choice for that, which is why some will eat some cottage cheese and such before bed. Most people eat on a regular schedule, and whey does have various unique benefits and effects (tons of studies posted in this thread...), so whey is generally the go to protein supplement.
    tanks verry much for yor reply! because of my work i'm not able to eat every 3 hours, so i will plan on that with the right shake.
    Again, thanks!
    Reply With Quote

  7. #97
    INDUSTRY INSIDER WillBrink's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2002
    Location: United States
    Posts: 13,844
    Rep Power: 88929
    WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000)
    WillBrink is offline
    Various studies suggests whey improves glycemic control and oxidative stress. This study done in a diabetic population:

    CHANGE OF SOME OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS AFTER SUPPLEMENTATION WITH WHEY PROTEIN ISOLATE IN TYPE 2 DIABETIC PATIENTS: Whey protein isolate in oxidative stress

    J. Nutrition 14 December 2019, 110700



    Highlights

    • Chronic hyperglycemia is associated with long-term damage, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels

    •The development of these disorders reflects complex pathological processes in which the oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species

    •Daily supplementation of undenaturated cysteine-rich whey protein isolate improved oxidative stress and inflammatory markers

    Source:

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...9990071930259X
    BrinkZone, Where Bro-Science Got Rabies and Died!

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Check out my BrinkZone mini site on BB.com at:

    www.bodybuilding.com/fun/willbrink.htm

    => President and Founder of Shaved head with goatee Crew
    => Science over bro science Crew
    Reply With Quote

  8. #98
    Registered User fitnessguyuk's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2020
    Age: 50
    Posts: 14
    Rep Power: 0
    fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    fitnessguyuk is offline

    How much is too much?

    I weigh about 78kg and am managing to get around 170g of protein per day - one scoop of whey with breakfast and two in my protein shakes are my supplemented protein. I generally have these in the morning. Would it be advisable to take a slower acting protein in the evening to provide my body with enough during the night?
    Reply With Quote

  9. #99
    Registered User fitnessguyuk's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2020
    Age: 50
    Posts: 14
    Rep Power: 0
    fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10) fitnessguyuk is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    fitnessguyuk is offline
    Originally Posted by fitnessguyuk View Post
    I weigh about 78kg and am managing to get around 170g of protein per day - one scoop of whey with breakfast and two in my protein shakes are my supplemented protein. I generally have these in the morning. Would it be advisable to take a slower acting protein in the evening to provide my body with enough during the night?
    To follow up - I am generally now evening out at around 160g to 170g of protein per day. Also taking 4g of creatine per day - I am seeing gains gradually which I guess is the best way to do it.
    Reply With Quote

  10. #100
    Chromadex Verified faipdeooiad's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2012
    Location: Manchester, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
    Posts: 5,184
    Rep Power: 64418
    faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000) faipdeooiad has much to be proud of. One of the best! (+20000)
    faipdeooiad is offline
    It’s really not necessary to have a slower digesting casein protein for overnight. Just hit your macros for the day and you’re good to go
    Strong & Unstable
    Reply With Quote

  11. #101
    INDUSTRY INSIDER WillBrink's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2002
    Location: United States
    Posts: 13,844
    Rep Power: 88929
    WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000)
    WillBrink is offline
    This may not seem whey related to some, but it is, as whey is the most effective method - along with it's many other potential benefits - to keep Glutathione levels up. NAC is another route of keeping Glutathione levels up, but with whey you're getting the protein, BCAA's, etc:

    Glutathione Serum Levels and Rate of Multimorbidity Development in Older Adults.


    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2019 Apr 25.

    Abstract

    We aimed to investigate the association between baseline levels of total serum glutathione (tGSH) and rate of chronic disease accumulation over time. The study population (n = 2,596) was derived from a population-based longitudinal study on ≥60-year-olds living in Stockholm. Participants were clinically assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-year follow-ups.

    Multimorbidity was measured as the number of chronic conditions from a previously built list of 60 diseases. Linear mixed models were applied to analyze the association between baseline tGSH levels and the rate of multimorbidity development over 6 years. We found that at baseline, participants with ≥4 diseases had lower tGSH levels than participants with no chronic conditions (3.3 vs 3.6 µmol/L; p < .001). At follow-up, baseline levels of tGSH were inversely associated with the rate of multimorbidity development (β * time: -0.044, p < .001) after adjusting for age, sex, education, levels of serum creatinine, C-reactive protein, albumin, body mass index, smoking, and time of dropout or death.

    In conclusion, serum levels of tGSH are inversely associated with multimorbidity development; the association exists above and beyond the link between tGSH and specific chronic conditions. Our findings support the hypothesis that tGSH is a biomarker of multisystem dysregulation that eventually leads to multimorbidity.
    BrinkZone, Where Bro-Science Got Rabies and Died!

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Check out my BrinkZone mini site on BB.com at:

    www.bodybuilding.com/fun/willbrink.htm

    => President and Founder of Shaved head with goatee Crew
    => Science over bro science Crew
    Reply With Quote

  12. #102
    INDUSTRY INSIDER WillBrink's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2002
    Location: United States
    Posts: 13,844
    Rep Power: 88929
    WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000)
    WillBrink is offline
    Folks, interesting paper on the Appetite−Suppressant/GLP-1-Stimulating Effects of Whey Proteins:

    The Appetite−Suppressant and GLP-1-Stimulating Effects of Whey Proteins in Obese Subjects are Associated with Increased Circulating Levels of Specific Amino Acids

    Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 775;

    Abstract


    The satiating effect of whey proteins depends upon their unique amino acid composition because there is no difference when comparing whey proteins or a mix of amino acids mimicking the amino acid composition of whey proteins. The specific amino acids underlying the satiating effect of whey proteins have not been investigated to date.

    Aims and Methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the appetite-suppressant effect of an isocaloric drink containing whey proteins or maltodextrins on appetite (satiety/hunger measured by a visual analogue scale or VAS), anorexigenic gastrointestinal peptides (circulating levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY)) and amino acids (circulating levels of single, total [TAA] and branched-chain amino acids [BCAA]) in a cohort of obese female subjects (n = 8; age: 18.4 ± 3.1 years; body mass index, BMI: 39.2 ± 4.6 kg/m2).

    Results. Each drink significantly increased satiety and decreased hunger, the effects being more evident with whey proteins than maltodextrins. Similarly, circulating levels of GLP-1, PYY and amino acids (TAA, BCAA and alanine, arginine, asparagine, citrulline, glutamine, hydroxyproline, isoleucine, histidine, leucine, lysine, methionine, ornithine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tyrosine, and valine) were significantly higher with whey proteins than maltodextrins. In subjects administered whey proteins (but not maltodextrins), isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, tyrosine, and valine were significantly correlated with hunger (negatively), satiety, and GLP-1 (positively).

    Conclusions. Eight specific amino acids (isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, tyrosine, and valine) were implicated in the appetite-suppressant and GLP-1-stimulating effects of whey proteins, which may be mediated by their binding with nutrient-sensing receptors expressed by L cells within the gastrointestinal wall. The long-term satiating effect of whey proteins and the effectiveness of a supplementation with these amino acids (i.e., as a nutraceutical intervention) administered during body weight reduction programs need to be further investigated.

    Full paper:

    https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/3/775/htm
    BrinkZone, Where Bro-Science Got Rabies and Died!

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Check out my BrinkZone mini site on BB.com at:

    www.bodybuilding.com/fun/willbrink.htm

    => President and Founder of Shaved head with goatee Crew
    => Science over bro science Crew
    Reply With Quote

  13. #103
    Registered User majorintensity's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2020
    Age: 50
    Posts: 30
    Rep Power: 0
    majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50) majorintensity will become famous soon enough. (+50)
    majorintensity is offline
    Very informative post, I'm definitely referring my gym noobs to this.
    Reply With Quote

  14. #104
    INDUSTRY INSIDER WillBrink's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2002
    Location: United States
    Posts: 13,844
    Rep Power: 88929
    WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000) WillBrink has a brilliant future. Third best rank! (+40000)
    WillBrink is offline
    Does whey have any potential benefits to this current Covid 19 crisis? I strongly suspect the answer is yes: Whey is the most effect way to increase glutathione (GSH), which is essential for the immune system to deal with viruses. Another effective route is via N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which can be taken orally or IV. Here's a sampling of the lit on the importance of GSH for viral challenges etc below.

    Glutathione as an antiviral – A sampling of the literature

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21358592

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18926849

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16787218

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9367343

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11115795

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26692473

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9568464

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8441757

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18678861

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12368227

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31487871

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29033950

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9230243

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12654482

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21366409

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24899897

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24899897

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28039563

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8891667

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9164274

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26663823

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8256245

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19151318

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25135637

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5425915/

    While it's a small % of people who will experience serious complications from this virus, here's my thoughts on the above (GSH. etc) as well as possible method to combat those serious complications:

    https://brinkzone.com/life-saving-st...complications/
    BrinkZone, Where Bro-Science Got Rabies and Died!

    www.BrinkZone.com

    Check out my BrinkZone mini site on BB.com at:

    www.bodybuilding.com/fun/willbrink.htm

    => President and Founder of Shaved head with goatee Crew
    => Science over bro science Crew
    Reply With Quote

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts