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  1. #1
    Registered Bro Who?'s Avatar
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    Is Python + SQL enough to land a good job in today's market? (with business degree)

    I have a bachelors degree in business but I feel that my options for "great" jobs in finance (and software development) are limited. If I'm able to code in Python and SQL am I considered "competitive," or should I learn another language or two, and/or get an MBA. I'm referring to high paying jobs ($200,000+) (and/or adjusted to fit a higher standard of living) in locations like New York City, San Francisco, London, etc. in finance or software development.


    This is a really vague and unspecific question, I know, but I'm trying to get an idea of where I would stand among other job-seekers. I do not come from a target school, just a state school. No internships, just sales experience.
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    Originally Posted by Who? View Post
    I have a bachelors degree in business but I feel that my options for "great" jobs in finance (and software development) are limited. If I'm able to code in Python and SQL am I considered "competitive," or should I learn another language or two, and/or get an MBA. I'm referring to high paying jobs ($200,000+) (and/or adjusted to fit a higher standard of living) in locations like New York City, San Francisco, London, etc. in finance or software development.


    This is a really vague and unspecific question, I know, but I'm trying to get an idea of where I would stand among other job-seekers. I do not come from a target school, just a state school. No internships, just sales experience.
    my guess is for finance, you'd need to learn python and R. sql isn't too hard. you need to be able to learn how to program and create models. you will probably need a portfolio to stand out since (i think) python is pretty common now. i'd imagine big cities are super competitive.

    i'm a business data analyst and i use sql daily. i know python, but that's what we have data scientists for so i never use it.
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  3. #3
    Banned Ittoryu's Avatar
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    If you want to do software development (no knowledge of finance here), it really depends on your skills. Python is a language in demand, and so is SQL, but do you just know the basics? Do you know what data structures are? Do you know how to do object-oriented python? Do you know how to properly architect a software application from ground-up? etc. etc. There are so many factors in just your skills in python. 200k is usually a salary for people on the upper end spectrum of skills in development which it doesn't sound like you are (since you're asking this question). And at that salary point, I'm pretty sure most devs are more than just coding monkeys. They know the whole SDLC inside-out, have good leadership skills, can design a good software, etc.
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    Registered Bro Who?'s Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Ittoryu View Post
    If you want to do software development (no knowledge of finance here), it really depends on your skills. Python is a language in demand, and so is SQL, but do you just know the basics? Do you know what data structures are? Do you know how to do object-oriented python? Do you know how to properly architect a software application from ground-up? etc. etc. There are so many factors in just your skills in python. 200k is usually a salary for people on the upper end spectrum of skills in development which it doesn't sound like you are (since you're asking this question). And at that salary point, I'm pretty sure most devs are more than just coding monkeys. They know the whole SDLC inside-out, have good leadership skills, can design a good software, etc.
    I wouldn't call myself an "expert" or say that I know every aspect, but I have always been able to learn how to do what I needed done, and learn what I wanted to. I'm currently taking a Data Science class online. From my online job search data science/big data seems to have exploded the past couple of years and keeps growing and growing.
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    Originally Posted by Who? View Post
    I wouldn't call myself an "expert" or say that I know every aspect, but I have always been able to learn how to do what I needed done, and learn what I wanted to. I'm currently taking a Data Science class online. From my online job search data science/big data seems to have exploded the past couple of years and keeps growing and growing.
    Yes, I understand your point. But you can do something that is efficient (takes you less time to complete, and runs in a better time complexity) or you can simply get the job done. This usually comes with experience. I'm not saying you can't eventually get a high paying job, but it's ridiculous to assume the basics and getting the job done is enough to warrant a 200k+ salary.

    And yes, big data is pretty hot right now.
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    SQL is good to learn brody. Only thing is, you need to also understand the data tables you're pulling data from. Like, what do certain flags stand for when reading a line, what tables hold what data, is the data complete. From my experience that comes from working with people who already know the tables you'll be working with. GL man

    When I was job searching, r was another big one that you can use. There's plenty of online tutorials for r as well since it's open source
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    Python + SQL leading to a $200k salary is unlikely. Even if you were a backend dev you'd need to know more and you'd still have trouble cresting $200k. Most sr/lead dev jobs I've seen seem to cap out at around 190k around here. You need to be in a managerial position if you seek to get over the $200k mark.

    Even as a jr dev you may have trouble as most employers want a formal CS degree. You might be better off looking at more business related jobs. Python and sql skills can serve you well in finance or data analyst positions and will make you standout out and give better opportunities towards advancement.

    I would probably pursue a MBA from a reputable program though. That combined with other skills will put you in the best position for a $200k salary even if that's 5-10 years down the road. Most of the management positions paying $220k+ seem to have a MBA as a prereq though I'm focusing on specific fields relevant to me so this may not be particularly applicable to you or your job market.
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  8. #8
    Registered User Cartiac's Avatar
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    As others have said, your salary expectations are quite far off. Why do you feel you deserve one of the "great" jobs with just a basic skill level and little to no experience?

    That being said it sounds like you are moving in the right direction to get where you want to be. Analytics is a very hot field with good pay right now but you don't get the great jobs until you prove you can deliver high value projects. You need to know how to code but more importantly you need to know how to solve problems with technology.

    You can make decent money as a good coder, but to get the kind of money you are talking about you need to be the guy that has the vision, can sell that vision, and tell the coders how to do it.
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    Registered User HangerBaby's Avatar
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    I would be very surprised if someone who only knew Python and SQL made over 100k... anywhere. Python is used in some financial capacity, CAD, other engineering applications, etc... but as far as software development is concerned the jobs are much rarer than most other languages. The pay reflects that.. the demand is just not that high
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    Originally Posted by HangerBaby View Post
    I would be very surprised if someone who only knew Python and SQL made over 100k... anywhere. Python is used in some financial capacity, CAD, other engineering applications, etc... but as far as software development is concerned the jobs are much rarer than most other languages. The pay reflects that.. the demand is just not that high
    data scientists make over 100k easily and they can get by only using SQL, python, and R.
    granted, knowing those tools and knowing the concepts behind them (e.g., machine learning, etc) are two different things.

    i work at a tech company about 150 miles north of san francisco - i was under qualified for my job but they liked me enough to hire me. i make a little under 100k.

    edit - i think the difference between a 60k (average salary for a SQL analyst) and 100k salary is not only knowing the technical skillset but being able to solve problems. any monkey can run sql queries, but knowing how to use the data to solve complex problems is a different beast.
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    Software development is not necessarily about how many programming languages you know, it's more about knowing how to fix problems and that usually comes with experience. When you have an understanding of software development, picking up a new language is not a challenge. I never programmed with PHP before,but I was able to fix things at my new job very fast with PHP because I do have the fundamental concepts of software development. Learning the syntax is not the challenge, the challenge is knowing how to understand issues and come up with efficient solutions (short term and long term).

    Employers (especially for entry level positions) are generally looking for someone who has fundamental understanding of how to fix real life problems, the focus won't be on what specific language you know because that does not reflect on your ability as a developer. My suggestion would be either get experience if you can as an intern/temp, to just get your foot in the door. Apply everywhere, show passion and willingness to learn. Build stuffs that showcases your ability to think, plan, and finish things. Build a website or a mobile app, anything to proof your skills if you are lacking work experience. Best of luck!
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  12. #12
    Registered User Wafae's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Who? View Post
    I wouldn't call myself an "expert" or say that I know every aspect, but I have always been able to learn how to do what I needed done, and learn what I wanted to. I'm currently taking a Data Science class online. From my online job search data science/big data seems to have exploded the past couple of years and keeps growing and growing.
    Classes you took and things you learned by yourself are not enough at all to get you 200K salary, You need relevant work experience for that. If you have no relevant work experience, you should start with focusing on getting that first and totally ignore the money factor in the beginning especially if you don't have a degree in CS. However, the things you know can definitely help you get an entry/temp position to start off with.
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