Closed Thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Registered User gregpphoto's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2012
    Age: 35
    Posts: 2
    Rep Power: 0
    gregpphoto has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    gregpphoto is offline

    Hamstring tendon slides over fibula during leg presses

    Hi all, I recently started a workout program after an Illiotibial Band Syndrome recovery. I began to notice that my lateral (outside) hamstring tendon sort of "pops" or "slides" out of place and back again each time I flex past 90 deg. on a leg press machine. It can happen doing squats as well, but not if I position my feet away from each other, this seems to help. Interestingly, when I use my fingers to place pressure on the tendon, it corrects it, while my phys. therapist tried taping it but it doesn't work. Its not overly painful, but its very uncomfortable and becomes tender and sore afterwards. Anyone know whats going on? My therapist said shes not sure whats causing it, could be my anatomy?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Definition seeker nerd_power's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2009
    Age: 40
    Posts: 616
    Rep Power: 1385
    nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000) nerd_power is just really nice. (+1000)
    nerd_power is offline
    Perhaps your knees are not stable during the exercise?

    Here's my thinking: ITBS generally correlates with weak hip muscles, specifically hip abductors. If your weak hip abductors are allowing your femurs to adduct too much (knees collapsing inward on the negative of a squat or leg press), this would put the knee in a compromised position, and might transfer unpleasant stresses onto the hamstring tendon.

    In a squat, your knees should be very stable over your feet; they have to move forward and backward, but you should carefully control and minimize any inward or outward wobble during the exercise. Leg press is the same, although it's harder to describe since the term "over your feet" doesn't really apply in leg press.

    Maybe that will help? Perhaps you will discover you need to use a lower weight on squat/leg press until you can appropriately strengthen hip abductors and adductors.

    -Andrew

  3. #3
    Registered User gregpphoto's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2012
    Age: 35
    Posts: 2
    Rep Power: 0
    gregpphoto has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    gregpphoto is offline
    Originally Posted by nerd_power View Post
    Perhaps your knees are not stable during the exercise?

    Here's my thinking: ITBS generally correlates with weak hip muscles, specifically hip abductors. If your weak hip abductors are allowing your femurs to adduct too much (knees collapsing inward on the negative of a squat or leg press), this would put the knee in a compromised position, and might transfer unpleasant stresses onto the hamstring tendon.

    In a squat, your knees should be very stable over your feet; they have to move forward and backward, but you should carefully control and minimize any inward or outward wobble during the exercise. Leg press is the same, although it's harder to describe since the term "over your feet" doesn't really apply in leg press.

    Maybe that will help? Perhaps you will discover you need to use a lower weight on squat/leg press until you can appropriately strengthen hip abductors and adductors.

    -Andrew
    Interesting. Part of my Illiotibial band issues was that while descending stairs, my problem knee would turn a bit inwards. And conversely, if I pick up something heavy, if I plant my feet out, away from the body, this seems to prevent the tendon from popping out.

  4. #4
    Registered User label027's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Posts: 1
    Rep Power: 0
    label027 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    label027 is offline
    I have the same problem. When I squat the tendon slides over that round part of the fibula when extended past 90. It doesn't hurt, but I can definitely feel it. It has always done that for me, but I doubt that it is normal. I actually used to guage how far to go down on squats based on this slide over the tendons! Not good. Have you come up with a fix?

  5. #5
    92b pwneq MakeABanana's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2009
    Location: New Jersey, United States
    Posts: 25,395
    Rep Power: 137797
    MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000) MakeABanana has a reputation beyond repute. Second best rank possible! (+100000)
    MakeABanana is offline
    When you squat, spread your knees out and open your hips up like a "bad girl". Also, try foam rolling the IT band and stretching as well. If symptoms persist, you're going to have to check with a physician. Sounds like you may have a subluxating biceps femoris tendon because of an abnormal insertion.
    أشهد أن لا إله إلاَّ الله و أشهد أن محمد رسول الله

  6. #6
    Platinum User mandimeoutof10's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2011
    Age: 34
    Posts: 3,836
    Rep Power: 7117
    mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000) mandimeoutof10 is a name known to all. (+5000)
    mandimeoutof10 is offline
    Originally Posted by MakeABanana View Post
    When you squat, spread your knees out and open your hips up like a "bad girl"
    ***ETAC***
    Sponsored by Team Rustletech
    2k+ link

  7. #7
    Registered User avigotsky's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2011
    Location: West Nyack, New York, United States
    Age: 29
    Posts: 143
    Rep Power: 249
    avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50) avigotsky will become famous soon enough. (+50)
    avigotsky is offline
    I'm no doctor, but have been experiencing the same problem for a few years now. I just did some research and I think it may be Snapping Hamstring Syndrome.

    This occurs when the Biceps Femoris (lateral hamstring) Tendon's insertion is "faulty," and does not insert correctly to the posterolateral part of the fibular head.

    Again, I'm not certain this is what you or I have, but it is a possibility.

    Here's an article on it: drrobertlaprademd.com/snapping-hamstrings-pain - Other than the pain, my symptoms seem to fit.

    If you look at other people's insertion points, they don't go AROUND the fibular head, they just insert in the back (posterolateral). Mine goes around and (I think) inserts anterolaterally.

    Hope this helps!

  8. #8
    Registered User jmarcus101's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2011
    Age: 31
    Posts: 262
    Rep Power: 137
    jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0) jmarcus101 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    jmarcus101 is offline
    I'll have to agree with avigo. In an anatomically normal person, you can't have the hamstring (biceps femoris) snap over the head of the fibula as that's where its insertion point is. However, there are some cases where it has a lower attachment just beneath the head. This is pretty rare though. Most people reporting in this thread likely have a form of ITBS or potentially a snapping from their popliteus muscle.
    To answer most training questions-

    Strength: >85% 1RM <6reps 2-6sets
    Power
    - Single effort: 80-90% 1RM, 1-2reps 3-5sets
    - Multi effort: 75-85% 1RM, 3-5reps 3-5sets
    Hypertrophy: 67-85% 1RM, 6-12reps 3-6sets
    Endurance: <67% 1RM, >12 reps 2-3sets

    --GCSU Athletic Training--

  9. #9
    Registered User readsonnet88's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2014
    Age: 33
    Posts: 1
    Rep Power: 0
    readsonnet88 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    readsonnet88 is offline

    Thumbs down stretch your ham

    Your hamstrings are too tight and shoes too narrow.

  10. #10
    Registered User iheartLV's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2014
    Age: 32
    Posts: 1
    Rep Power: 0
    iheartLV has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    iheartLV is offline
    Originally Posted by gregpphoto View Post
    Hi all, I recently started a workout program after an Illiotibial Band Syndrome recovery. I began to notice that my lateral (outside) hamstring tendon sort of "pops" or "slides" out of place and back again each time I flex past 90 deg. on a leg press machine. It can happen doing squats as well, but not if I position my feet away from each other, this seems to help. Interestingly, when I use my fingers to place pressure on the tendon, it corrects it, while my phys. therapist tried taping it but it doesn't work. Its not overly painful, but its very uncomfortable and becomes tender and sore afterwards. Anyone know whats going on? My therapist said shes not sure whats causing it, could be my anatomy?

    Thanks

    just wondering if you figured anything out to help with this snapping hamstring since your post? I have the same issue. I have seen several DRs and physical therapists. Still nothing to improve this snapping hamstring.

  11. #11
    Registered User Kenacillin's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2008
    Age: 40
    Posts: 289
    Rep Power: 356
    Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50) Kenacillin will become famous soon enough. (+50)
    Kenacillin is offline
    Reading everything above, it makes sense that it could just be that abnormal insertion of the tendon of the lateral hamstring. If the insertion was intact, it wouldn't roll over the fibular head in knee flexion.

    Thinking of modifications to exercises, it is hard to change foot placements or finding variations that would change the line of movement of that tendon. Although there is more movement in the fibular head in a closed chain movements (squat, lunges). These micro-movements occur with ankle movements, primarily a slight gliding up and down of the fibular head. With that being said, you can try leg extensions instead for now? Hope this helps.
    Everybody wanna get big, but nobody wanna do legs!!

  12. #12
    Registered Idiot AlexTheNewbie's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2013
    Location: Switzerland
    Posts: 3,106
    Rep Power: 12111
    AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000) AlexTheNewbie is a splendid one to behold. (+10000)
    AlexTheNewbie is offline
    Reviving this thread since I'm suffering from exactly the same problem..

    Has anyone had a permanent way to still squat and progress without any injuries or problems?

    It doesn't hurt for me, however it's really annoying to feel it snap everytime and I doubt it's healthy..

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts