Reply
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 31 to 41 of 41
  1. #31
    Registered User sdf777's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2012
    Posts: 4
    Rep Power: 0
    sdf777 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    sdf777 is offline

    Total Replacement of both shoulders in 2018

    Here's my story. I'm 66 and been lifting all my life. In January 2018 had my left shoulder replaced (bad arthritis). Went very well. Was lifting light after 8 weeks and reasonable heavy after 12 weeks. One weakness was pec deck motion. Where before this was my best movement (whole stack for many reps) I could barely move 50 pounds after 12 weeks. No problem with press or pull motions. Took six months to get back to about 75% strength. Had my right shoulder replaced in November. It went even better than the left and after 8 weeks have full range of motion. Seeing the ortho tomorrow and hoping to get clearance for light weights. Highly recommend the surgery as I was in pain before. My doctor played basketball at Duke so understands lifting. He says just don't go crazy like 1 rep max but ok to do weight to failure at 10 -12 reps. Avoid overhead press but incline ok.
    Reply With Quote

  2. #32
    Registered User JD2C's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2018
    Age: 49
    Posts: 6
    Rep Power: 0
    JD2C is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    JD2C is offline
    That's awesome to hear sdf777, pretty impressive after shoulder replacement surgeries. Got a few questions, are you keeping high reps with your set like 10-20? For chess, are you better with the dumbbell press instead of the barbell? if you don't mind and can share your program, that will help me a lot next week.

    as of today, I still can't do a push-up, I have to be inclined by using the counter-top. It's driving me nuts.
    Reply With Quote

  3. #33
    Registered User sdf777's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2012
    Posts: 4
    Rep Power: 0
    sdf777 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    sdf777 is offline
    Originally Posted by JD2C View Post
    That's awesome to hear sdf777, pretty impressive after shoulder replacement surgeries. Got a few questions, are you keeping high reps with your set like 10-20? For chess, are you better with the dumbbell press instead of the barbell? if you don't mind and can share your program, that will help me a lot next week.

    as of today, I still can't do a push-up, I have to be inclined by using the counter-top. It's driving me nuts.
    I stay between 10-12 reps. I also stay away from dumbbell presses. Getting them into position and dropping them over the years is what I think added to my shoulder problems. I use plate loaded machines like Hammer press and incline along with a pec deck for chest. For back my gym has plate loaded row and pulldown machines and I start with assisted pullups. I'm only using dumbbells and angle bar for biceps. Stay encouraged, progress takes time and depending on your age, months not weeks.
    Reply With Quote

  4. #34
    Registered User JD2C's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2018
    Age: 49
    Posts: 6
    Rep Power: 0
    JD2C is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    JD2C is offline
    Excellent, here's what I'm thinking to start with next week, still taking my 3days/week program powerlifting, however the weight will be totally different and more assisted. Something like
    Day1; Chest and lats always 5 set of 10-12
    Barbell decline (don't think I can do flat)
    Dumbbell bench (or machine as you suggested)
    Fly (machine assisted)
    Cable seated row
    reverse grip machine lat pulldown (not sure how the pulldown will go)
    close grip front lat pulldown
    Day 2; Legs and Triceps always 5 set of 10-12
    Reverse Hack squat (once I get my leg back, will start with full squat if my shoulders can tolerate it)
    Leg Press
    Leg curl/or extension
    Dip Machine
    Triceps V Bar
    Cable One Arm Tricep Extension (once tricep back, will do bench press close grip)
    Day 3; Shoulders and Biceps always 5 set of 10-12
    Deadlift
    Barbell shrugs behind the back
    cable front raise
    Dumbbell one arm preacher curl
    cable drag curl
    dumbbell concentration curls

    Based on your experience, let me know what I need to be more careful with? or something like for Bench Press or row, not to go the entire way down? Anything you can think of?

    Thanks in advance sdf777
    Reply With Quote

  5. #35
    Registered User sdf777's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2012
    Posts: 4
    Rep Power: 0
    sdf777 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    sdf777 is offline
    Originally Posted by JD2C View Post
    Excellent, here's what I'm thinking to start with next week, still taking my 3days/week program powerlifting, however the weight will be totally different and more assisted. Something like
    Day1; Chest and lats always 5 set of 10-12
    Barbell decline (don't think I can do flat)
    Dumbbell bench (or machine as you suggested)
    Fly (machine assisted)
    Cable seated row
    reverse grip machine lat pulldown (not sure how the pulldown will go)
    close grip front lat pulldown
    Day 2; Legs and Triceps always 5 set of 10-12
    Reverse Hack squat (once I get my leg back, will start with full squat if my shoulders can tolerate it)
    Leg Press
    Leg curl/or extension
    Dip Machine
    Triceps V Bar
    Cable One Arm Tricep Extension (once tricep back, will do bench press close grip)
    Day 3; Shoulders and Biceps always 5 set of 10-12
    Deadlift
    Barbell shrugs behind the back
    cable front raise
    Dumbbell one arm preacher curl
    cable drag curl
    dumbbell concentration curls

    Based on your experience, let me know what I need to be more careful with? or something like for Bench Press or row, not to go the entire way down? Anything you can think of?

    Thanks in advance sdf777
    Be sure you are at least 12 weeks out before doing more than very light weight. Behind the back shrug will stress your shoulders more than in front.
    Reply With Quote

  6. #36
    Registered User NapEsq's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2015
    Age: 49
    Posts: 1
    Rep Power: 0
    NapEsq has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    NapEsq is offline

    Ream & Run

    I am 52 years old and needed a shoulder replacement since I was 48. I did not want a TSR (total shoulder replacement) because once you do, your lifting career is OVER. The glenoid plastic component that is installed cannot handle the pressure heavy lifting places on it. As such I did my research and found Dr. Matsen in Seattle from the University of Washington who pioneered the Ream and Run procedure 25 years ago. This is the ONLY procedure available which has no restrictions on the use of your shoulder and WILL allow you to continue to lift as hard as you can. I had my R&R performed on September 11, 2018 when I was 51.

    At 4 months post-op on January 11, 2019, I was given the green light to start to lift again, light weight, high reps. I have done this for a month solid with all my exercises for chest, back, shoulders and arms. On February 11, 2019, I will begin to go back to regular lifting and work my way back to where I left off.

    Dr. Matsen was a God send to me. I live in the Cleveland, Ohio area where we have two of the top 10 hospitals in the nation, The Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals of Cleveland. I went to the top shoulder doctors at both of those institutions and each told me the same, my lifting is over after a TSR. I even consulted with the same orthopedic surgeon who did Louie Simmons replacement, however with his replacement my research established that his glenoid component is not a long term viable option because it is still a plastic type of joint. Thus, the R&R is the ONLY option if you want to lift hard again.

    The R&R is NOT FOR EVERYONE! You have to be a highly motivated person because the rehab is intense, not like a traditional TSR, the initial pain is more and lasts longer.

    For rehab, during the first six weeks you are not allowed to lift anything with your arm more than a cup of tea. You MUST stretch 5 times a day for the first six weeks. At the beginning its about 15 minutes per session but it will eventually progress to 20 or more minutes per session. You stretching actually begins in the recovery room. For each stretching exercise, you perform 5 reps per stretch and hold for a full 10 seconds from when you get to the stopping point. You are then to progress to full 30 second hold per rep. My motto was to stretch NOT to the pain, but INTO the pain but NOT through it. I made sure it was a true 10 to eventually 30 seconds per rep by using the stopwatch on my phone instead of counting in my head.

    I started stretching at 7:30 am and then stretched again every 3 to 4 hours with my last session at 7:30 pm or so. My goal was one session every 3 hours. However, depending on if I had to extend my stretching to every 4 hours because of my schedule, then sometimes my last stretch was close to or even after midnight. Nonetheless, I made sure I did 5 stretches a day without missing a single session for the first six weeks. After six weeks, then you are able to start actual rehabilitation and building strength in your shoulder but you still stretch two to three times a day. After nine weeks, you stretch once a day for the rest of your life.

    To start the review process with Dr. Matsen is simple; all you have to do is to send him your x-rays and/or MRI, he will review it and contact you directly. He did that with me and I scheduled my surgery with him at that time. When it came time for my surgery, I flew to Seattle to the University of Washington on a Sunday, meet in person with Dr. Matsen on a Monday, had surgery on Tuesday, was released from the hospital on a Thursday and flew back home that Saturday.

    Dr Matsen is an incredible doctor, not just because of my results, but his responsiveness. For instance, I had some pain that was new to me two weeks post-op, so I sent him an email at 6:30 am Cleveland time which was 3:30 am Seattle time. He responded back to me a half hour later at 7:00 am Cleveland time which was 4:00 am Seattle time. Later that morning he called to talk to me in person. Whenever I sent Dr. Matsen an email with questions, he responded immediately with an answer. Further, on a weekly basis I would send him videos of my stretches. On the same day, he would send me back an email commenting on how I was doing in the videos.

    Like any surgery, it is not a 100% successful. Further, there are a group of people who have an R&R and like me progress at a good pace. There is a second group of people who progress at a slower pass, some taking up to a full year. Then, like a traditional TSA, there is about a 10% failure rate.

    For more information on the R&R you can copy and paste the following in your browser but since I do not have enough posts, I cannot post a direct link so make sure you type (www) before you paste the link: .orthop.washington.edu/ReamandRunwithPT.pdf. For a Youtube video conducted by Dr. Matsen on the R&R you can copy and past .youtube.com/watch?v=MmSNYnc-avU. Additionally, there is a Face Book group where I am a member that you can ask questions of other Ream and Runners like myself by copying and paste: .facebook.com/groups/1194479510666751/ or just search FB for Ream & Run Support Group.

    If you want an R&R, be careful of the doctor you choose. Not every doctor can successfully perform a R&R. As a matter of fact, most will not attempt an R&R because of the precise nature of the surgery. You want a doctor who performs R&R on a routine basis. If you need to travel, I suggest you go to Seattle to the pioneer of the surgery, Dr. Matsen. Why go to a pupil of his when you can to the Master. Nonetheless, in Virginia Beach there is a Dr. Brad Carofino who studied under Dr. Matsen and whom seems to be well respected in our FB R&R support group.
    Last edited by NapEsq; 02-09-2019 at 11:59 AM.
    Reply With Quote

  7. #37
    Registered User luvtolift4ever's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2013
    Age: 60
    Posts: 2
    Rep Power: 0
    luvtolift4ever has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    luvtolift4ever is offline
    So glad I found this subject matter. I am a 60 year old male and have been bodybuilding for over 35 years that includes some NPC comps back in the day. A few years ago I began getting a lot weaker with my left shoulder and found out my arthritis had destroyed my cartilage. I have way too many bone spurs to try anything other then complete shoulder replacement. I have just set up an appointment with a shoulder replacement Doctor here in California and I am reading the posts to find out info about how long it takes for most people to start light lifting again. So from what Ive seen so far it look like sticking to the rehab and eating clean is very important. Looks like i am going to have to learn how to lift all over again so I don't re injure the shoulder replacement. My doctor told me that if I go for the full SR that I will not be able to lift more then 10lbs is this just him being over cautious or is he telling the truth. Looks like people with FSR are lifting much more then that after they do the rehab and start out slowly. I really want to still be able to work out after my FSR so any info would be helpful from the 60 and over bodybuilders on here. Thanks Lee
    Reply With Quote

  8. #38
    Banned AkiraFudo's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2019
    Age: 49
    Posts: 269
    Rep Power: 0
    AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo AkiraFudo
    AkiraFudo is offline
    For those who don't know he isn't replacing his shoulder he is replacing the tendons & connective tissue.
    Reply With Quote

  9. #39
    Registered User luvtolift4ever's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2013
    Age: 60
    Posts: 2
    Rep Power: 0
    luvtolift4ever has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    luvtolift4ever is offline
    Who are you talking about AkiraFudo?
    Reply With Quote

  10. #40
    Registered User sdf777's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2012
    Posts: 4
    Rep Power: 0
    sdf777 has no reputation, good or bad yet. (0)
    sdf777 is offline
    Originally Posted by luvtolift4ever View Post
    So glad I found this subject matter. I am a 60 year old male and have been bodybuilding for over 35 years that includes some NPC comps back in the day. A few years ago I began getting a lot weaker with my left shoulder and found out my arthritis had destroyed my cartilage. I have way too many bone spurs to try anything other then complete shoulder replacement. I have just set up an appointment with a shoulder replacement Doctor here in California and I am reading the posts to find out info about how long it takes for most people to start light lifting again. So from what Ive seen so far it look like sticking to the rehab and eating clean is very important. Looks like i am going to have to learn how to lift all over again so I don't re injure the shoulder replacement. My doctor told me that if I go for the full SR that I will not be able to lift more then 10lbs is this just him being over cautious or is he telling the truth. Looks like people with FSR are lifting much more then that after they do the rehab and start out slowly. I really want to still be able to work out after my FSR so any info would be helpful from the 60 and over bodybuilders on here. Thanks Lee
    Can't speak to your situation, but after my doctor told me the same thing after each shoulder replacement, no lifting for the first 2 months, 10 pounds max from 2 months to 3 and reasonable weighs after that (i.e. no powerlifting or one rep max sets). After 4 1/2 months after my right shoulder, my pulling movements are back to full strength (I'm doing 200 pounds pulldowns). Press is still very weak (135 is a challenge) and delt raises are the worst (10 pounds).
    Reply With Quote

  11. #41
    Registered User JD2C's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2018
    Age: 49
    Posts: 6
    Rep Power: 0
    JD2C is on a distinguished road. (+10)
    JD2C is offline
    Originally Posted by sdf777 View Post
    Can't speak to your situation, but after my doctor told me the same thing after each shoulder replacement, no lifting for the first 2 months, 10 pounds max from 2 months to 3 and reasonable weighs after that (i.e. no powerlifting or one rep max sets). After 4 1/2 months after my right shoulder, my pulling movements are back to full strength (I'm doing 200 pounds pulldowns). Press is still very weak (135 is a challenge) and delt raises are the worst (10 pounds).
    My surgeon was very open to those discussions, this is Steadman’s clinic at Vail, CO. They are dealing with professional athletes like football players and Olympians. These guys are crazy!! Some basic rules that I was given is to always keep an eye on the pinch and pain level, and never push through it too hard, that’s where problem start to occur.
    Since I wrote my program above, I increase the intensity by 3x, always keeping high rep 12 to 20 with some, 5 sets. I’m about 80% with pulls in general (push away the Teflon from the Cobalt ball). However, all the press (reverse) it’s till pretty hard and had to be very careful. I just did the 20lbs Dumbbell Shoulder Press, got to start very slow by just moving a few inches, then as you progress you move a bit more until it becomes comfortable. That’s how I could make it works.
    The key is to start very light, slow and listen to your body/joints. It’ll feel some pain which is normal with all the work they did but never push it too hard through it.
    Good luck.
    Reply With Quote

Similar Threads

  1. "Weightlifter's Shoulder" - Distal Clavicle Osteolysis - Resection Surgery
    By grebnehtor in forum Injury Recovery And Prevention
    Replies: 962
    Last Post: 02-13-2019, 07:41 AM
  2. Tips on shoulder reconstruction recovery?
    By scottsc in forum Over Age 35
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-10-2011, 12:15 PM
  3. Replies: 39
    Last Post: 05-01-2011, 05:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts