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  1. #1201
    Registered User noikeee's Avatar
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    There may be a bit of mistranslation going on here, because I'm not in an English speaking country (Portugal) and I'm not so sure how to translate what they told me. It's one of the most well-known doctors in the region.

    It makes sense to me, I'm constantly constipated despite having a high intake of fiber, I always feel constrained in a certain spot which is where it hurt a bit after the colonoscopy (doc said she tried to push it further but couldn't so stopped to avoid rupturing it), if my bowels are too tight there, it might because they're squeezed down and might collapse further down if I exert myself too much?
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    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by noikeee View Post
    There may be a bit of mistranslation going on here, because I'm not in an English speaking country (Portugal) and I'm not so sure how to translate what they told me. It's one of the most well-known doctors in the region.

    It makes sense to me, I'm constantly constipated despite having a high intake of fiber, I always feel constrained in a certain spot which is where it hurt a bit after the colonoscopy (doc said she tried to push it further but couldn't so stopped to avoid rupturing it), if my bowels are too tight there, it might because they're squeezed down and might collapse further down if I exert myself too much?
    An inguinal hernia is an opening in the abdominal wall due to a weakness in the wall. What usually happens is that your bowels go into the hole (usually small intestine but sometimes colon), that could cause digestive problems or worse. (Sometimes for a small hernia only omental fat goes in the hole but as it gets larger over time your intestines will follow). The solution is to get the hernia fixed, not to stop lifting.

    Hernia surgery nowadays is not perfect but considering that hundreds of years ago they castrated you, and then shoved a hot poker up into the hole to scar it up and close it, all without anesthetics or painkillers, it is a heck of a lot better.
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  3. #1203
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    Still sounds weird. Doctors don't generally tell people to just stop doing something, forever. They suggest a solution.

    See a doctor who knows about hernias, not bowel blockages.
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  4. #1204
    Registered User noikeee's Avatar
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    I've just managed to translate the little document they gave me:

    (...) progression to the splenic flexure/transverse colon not transposed due to intestinal loop prolapsed to the left iliac fossa under risk of laceration (...)

    I'm confused. That sounds more like it's already prolapsed, so I already have a hernia? Or this is something else? Under risk of laceration? (maybe that means under risk of laceration if she proceeded with the colonoscopy, which is what she told me?)

    Yeah I guess I need to either go back to the doctor and clear it up, or see someone else (although I have no idea who, all gastroenterologists covered by my insurance in my region are in the same clinic).
    Last edited by noikeee; 09-07-2017 at 12:57 PM.
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    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by noikeee View Post
    I've just managed to translate the little document they gave me:

    (...) progression to the splenic flexure/transverse colon not transposed due to intestinal loop prolapsed to the left iliac fossa under risk of laceration (...)

    I'm confused. That sounds more like it's already prolapsed, so I already have a hernia? Or this is something else? Under risk of laceration? (maybe that means under risk of laceration if she proceeded with the colonoscopy, which is what she told me?)

    Yeah I guess I need to either go back to the doctor and clear it up, or see someone else (although I have no idea who, all gastroenterologists covered by my insurance in my region are in the same clinic).


    Hernia


    Go back to your doctor or perhaps another doctor who isn't anti-weight training and get an explanation.
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    Registered User temerity76's Avatar
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    For a small hernia with primarily omentum in it, should I wait for surgery till it gets bigger or do it now itself? Heard that If we do surgery on a small hernia or prematurely, then the year can manifest somewhere else nearby and require surgery again. So it is really better to wait till it gets bigger and defined?
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    Originally Posted by SoccerAgain View Post
    I would just make sure that you're in complete control of your actions and aware of what's happening at the hernia site. I continued to play soccer with mine, and in the heat of battle it grew and more material got pushed through. But people live for many years with hernias, doing less extreme activities. You know exactly how big yours is and what it feels like, so should be aware of when it's stressed.
    Sound advice.
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    Originally Posted by noikeee View Post
    It makes sense to me, I'm constantly constipated despite having a high intake of fiber
    On side notes,
    If you are constipated despite eating high amount of fiber, you could be lacking in:
    Magnesium
    Potassium
    Sleep

    It doesn't matter how much fiber you eat, you get constipation if you lack any of those.
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  9. #1209
    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by temerity76 View Post
    For a small hernia with primarily omentum in it, should I wait for surgery till it gets bigger or do it now itself? Heard that If we do surgery on a small hernia or prematurely, then the year can manifest somewhere else nearby and require surgery again. So it is really better to wait till it gets bigger and defined?
    I think it's best you discuss that with a surgeon.

    Watchful waiting doesn't pay for asymptomatic inguinal hernias
    http://www.mdedge.com/familypractice...matic-inguinal
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    I agree with the last post, best to discuss those options with a medical professional. In my case, from the reading I did, and knowing I'd continue to be active, I came to the conclusion watchful waiting would only result in me having the operation at a later date, possibly at a far planned time, and potentially as a matter of urgency; entirely a personal decision though.

    I saw one GP who recommended waiting, and another who advised me to fix it sooner rather than later; I agreed with the viewpoint that I would only have been waiting for it to become more of an issue, it wouldn't heal itself.
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  11. #1211
    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    SoccerAgain,

    Do you know what type of fixation your surgeon used for your mesh?

    I know some surgeons use staples or titanium tacks.

    I asked mine when he popped his head in the pre-op area prior to my surgery 9 days ago and he said he uses a self-sticking mesh but if the hernia is very large then he will also secure it with some absorbable tacks, which will disappear in about 6 months.

    As I had already read this paper (he is one of the co-authors) it did not surprise me.

    Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4283099/

    I am hoping that the lack of staples/tacks may eliminate some of the long term pain issues that many face after mesh is implanted.

    BTW, I have my two week follow-up appointment with the surgeon this coming Tuesday (I have not seen him since the surgery).
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  12. #1212
    Registered User temerity76's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by KungFuFighting View Post
    I agree with the last post, best to discuss those options with a medical professional. In my case, from the reading I did, and knowing I'd continue to be active, I came to the conclusion watchful waiting would only result in me having the operation at a later date, possibly at a far planned time, and potentially as a matter of urgency; entirely a personal decision though.

    I saw one GP who recommended waiting, and another who advised me to fix it sooner rather than later; I agreed with the viewpoint that I would only have been waiting for it to become more of an issue, it wouldn't heal itself.
    Many docs in my area think it's better to wait for surgery as they think why do something now when it's not necessary.
    I don't agree, unless from a technical surgical view it would be better to wait. If the outcome of the surgery now or later would be same, then I'll prefer to get it done now, rather than restrict my activities for a year or more.

    I'll be showing to a senior doc and see what he advises.
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  13. #1213
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    Originally Posted by noikeee View Post
    I've just managed to translate the little document they gave me:

    (...) progression to the splenic flexure/transverse colon not transposed due to intestinal loop prolapsed to the left iliac fossa under risk of laceration (...)

    I'm confused. That sounds more like it's already prolapsed, so I already have a hernia? Or this is something else? Under risk of laceration? (maybe that means under risk of laceration if she proceeded with the colonoscopy, which is what she told me?)

    Yeah I guess I need to either go back to the doctor and clear it up, or see someone else (although I have no idea who, all gastroenterologists covered by my insurance in my region are in the same clinic).
    might be lacking good gut bacteria. try eating sauerkraut and some yogurt DAILY. after 2-4 weeks you should start seeing major changes.
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  14. #1214
    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Back in the gym 10 days post-op.

    Bench Press: 165x4, 155x5, 155x5
    Chins [45˚ grip]: BWx8, BWx8, BWx8
    Hammer Curls: 42.5x8, 42.5x8
    Seated DB Press: 45x8, 45x8

    My overriding rule today was no grinding. I probably could have gotten 165x6 on the bench but I stopped before the reps got hard.
    Same with the chins, usually I get at least 9,9,10 but those last reps have me thrashing around. I wanted to avoid that today. Interestingly the chins did not bother me; many who have had hernia repairs claim that it took months to get back to chins because of the tightness in the lower abs.

    No pain today, a bit of tugging at certain times and a bit of soreness after. But nothing extreme. Mentally, it's good to be back so fast.

    I am heartened by the instructions of one surgeon in New York for the identical surgery (although there is no way I would have gone to the gym on post-op day three): "On the third post-operative day, unless told differently by me, you have FULL UNRESTRICTED physical activity. There is no limitation, and the more you do, the quicker the pain and discomfort will disappear. Some discomfort and pain is normal. Your body will set your limits, though it is ok to be aggressive."
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    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Squat: 45x5, 135x5, 185x3, 225x2, 255x1, 275x1, 225x5 Put on belt for 275 set but could not cinch it to the 4th hole because of soreness at incision by my naval. Interestingly I felt my glutes straining at 275; have never noticed that beforer even at 325

    Leg Press: 270x12, 360x10
    Ab Wheel: 5reps, 10reps Usually do 20repsx2 but my lower abs are still sore. Probably, it is from when they stick the baloon into the pre-peritoneal space and pump it up to make space to work in. Then they inflate the space with C02 to keep it open while they work.

    Very helpful mentally. I am not where I was but I have set a floor on my lifts by 11 days out from surgery. Only way to go is up from here.
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    Registered User temerity76's Avatar
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    When lifting weights after a hernia, don't you wonder if you will get another hernia on other side since hernias are mostly genetic and indicate that the ab lining is thin?
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  17. #1217
    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by temerity76 View Post
    When lifting weights after a hernia, don't you wonder if you will get another hernia on other side since hernias are mostly genetic and indicate that the ab lining is thin?
    That's always possible. If you have laparoscopic surgery (of course only your doctor can decide which type of surgery is appropriate for you) the surgeon can check from the inside and see if you have a hernia on the other side.

    In my case he found a small one, which I had never noticed, on the left side. He repaired that too while he was inside with the scope and tools. So now I don't have to worry about it. Already taken care of.
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  18. #1218
    Registered User temerity76's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by culican View Post
    That's always possible. If you have laparoscopic surgery (of course only your doctor can decide which type of surgery is appropriate for you) the surgeon can check from the inside and see if you have a hernia on the other side.

    In my case he found a small one, which I had never noticed, on the left side. He repaired that too while he was inside with the scope and tools. So now I don't have to worry about it. Already taken care of.
    Once fixed a hernia won't relapse/occur due to strain? Sorry I am sounding like an idiot but I don't know anything about it and Google is full of conflicting opinions.
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  19. #1219
    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by temerity76 View Post
    Once fixed a hernia won't relapse/occur due to strain? Sorry I am sounding like an idiot but I don't know anything about it and Google is full of conflicting opinions.

    With a modern repair the recurrence rate is less than 1-1.5%. Bigger hernias may have a slightly higher recurrence rate and the longer you wait to get it fixed, the bigger it will be when they finally fix it.

    As far as strain goes, intra-abdominal pressure goes up when you brace yourself for a lift. But it goes even higher when you strain for a dump. Even higher than that when you jump.

    Try a little experiment: Put your hand down there between your leg and your you know what. Press lightly. Now cough. The pressure impulse is very high when you cough. Are you never going to get a cold or the flu again?

    Get it fixed.
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    Registered User temerity76's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by culican View Post
    With a modern repair the recurrence rate is less than 1-1.5%. Bigger hernias may have a slightly higher recurrence rate and the longer you wait to get it fixed, the bigger it will be when they finally fix it.

    As far as strain goes, intra-abdominal pressure goes up when you brace yourself for a lift. But it goes even higher when you strain for a dump. Even higher than that when you jump.

    Try a little experiment: Put your hand down there between your leg and your you know what. Press lightly. Now cough. The pressure impulse is very high when you cough. Are you never going to get a cold or the flu again?

    Get it fixed.
    Yup!
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    Registered User lockhrt999's Avatar
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    Are there any exercise which can reduce the chance of getting hernia?
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    Registered User temerity76's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lockhrt999 View Post
    Are there any exercise which can reduce the chance of getting hernia?
    From what I've read the answer is no. ( I might be wrong). It seems the abdomen lining is something we are born with and if it's thin then there's nothing we can do to increase its thickness.
    Of course poor form and holding your breath while lifting will increase the pressure, but as said...coughing and taking a dump has much higher ab pressure than lifting weights!

    You can strengthen your core and abs but there are no exercise to thicken the lining. I had a pretty solid core and was pretty proud of it. It came as a shocker to me when I saw the bump and learnt I had developed a hernia! That was actually not even on my mind since I thought I had my core well taken care of and was lifting with good form.
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    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Pressures created by various activities (don't cough or jump):

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    Registered User temerity76's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by culican View Post
    Pressures created by various activities (don't cough or jump):
    the

    So jumping rope/skipping is out? What about jogging?
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    Registered User culican's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by temerity76 View Post
    the

    So jumping rope/skipping is out? What about jogging?
    I don't think anything is "out" assuming you get it fixed. It is just to show that many activities create high intra-abdominal pressures.
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    Longtime lurker, first-time poster. Thanks to all for the good info on hernia recovery.

    I've had bilateral inguinal hernias for 5-10 years now. They're mostly painless, but I'm finally getting around to having the surgery. I'm 27, so I probably don't want to go the rest of my life without having the surgery.

    I've spoken to two different surgeons about the procedure. I was clear with both about my lifting habits. I'm no powerlifter, and my lifts are nothing amazing, but I do lift what most non-sports medicine docs consider "heavy" (benching 2 plates+, squatting 3 plates+, weighted pullups with 100+ pounds, etc.). Both surgeons insisted that I would have absolutely "zero" activity restrictions after 4-5 weeks post-op, and could go back to lifting 90-100% of my normal heavy loads and bicycling at 100% effort. They both said that, after 4-5 weeks, the repairs would essentially be as strong as they would ever be, and I would be unable to fail the repairs by lifting heavy no matter how hard I tried. They said that I would likely be able to start light (10-20 lb dumbbell) movements after 2-3 weeks. Thus, my intention is to go back to 90% of my normal heavy weight in squats, bench, dips, and pullups, and 100% effort bicycling after 4-5 weeks, and be back at 100% of my current loads within 6-8 weeks post-op.

    Many of the posters in this thread have suggested much longer recovery periods. But why? If the surgeon says it'll be at near-100% repair strength after 4-5 weeks, and I will be cleared to go 100% heavy, with zero activity restrictions at that time, why do so many in this thread wait 4-5 weeks to start even light jogging and 10 lb dumbbell work? Why do they wait six months (or even a year or two) to lift anything even remotely heavy? I can live with avoiding heavy weights for 4-5 weeks, but that's about my outer limit. The studies I've read suggest that no significant muscle atrophy occurs with 3-4 weeks of inactivity, but detraining accelerates quickly after that. If I need to wait longer than 4-5 weeks to go back to 2-plate bench presses and 3-plate squats, I might rethink the surgery entirely. Are my expectations unreasonable, even though they're consistent with the surgeon's instructions?

    For context, I have a much better than average tolerance for blunt trauma (bruises, muscle soreness, etc.) but a worse than average tolerance for stabbing/shooting pains. The surgeon claimed that post-op/recovery pain would feel like blunt trauma, "like taking a punch". He wants to do a bilateral laparoscopic mesh repair.
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  27. #1227
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    Originally Posted by Magnacromion View Post
    Longtime lurker, first-time poster. Thanks to all for the good info on hernia recovery.

    I've had bilateral inguinal hernias for 5-10 years now. They're mostly painless, but I'm finally getting around to having the surgery. I'm 27, so I probably don't want to go the rest of my life without having the surgery.

    I've spoken to two different surgeons about the procedure. I was clear with both about my lifting habits. I'm no powerlifter, and my lifts are nothing amazing, but I do lift what most non-sports medicine docs consider "heavy" (benching 2 plates+, squatting 3 plates+, weighted pullups with 100+ pounds, etc.). Both surgeons insisted that I would have absolutely "zero" activity restrictions after 4-5 weeks post-op, and could go back to lifting 90-100% of my normal heavy loads and bicycling at 100% effort. They both said that, after 4-5 weeks, the repairs would essentially be as strong as they would ever be, and I would be unable to fail the repairs by lifting heavy no matter how hard I tried. They said that I would likely be able to start light (10-20 lb dumbbell) movements after 2-3 weeks. Thus, my intention is to go back to 90% of my normal heavy weight in squats, bench, dips, and pullups, and 100% effort bicycling after 4-5 weeks, and be back at 100% of my current loads within 6-8 weeks post-op.

    Many of the posters in this thread have suggested much longer recovery periods. But why? If the surgeon says it'll be at near-100% repair strength after 4-5 weeks, and I will be cleared to go 100% heavy, with zero activity restrictions at that time, why do so many in this thread wait 4-5 weeks to start even light jogging and 10 lb dumbbell work? Why do they wait six months (or even a year or two) to lift anything even remotely heavy? I can live with avoiding heavy weights for 4-5 weeks, but that's about my outer limit. The studies I've read suggest that no significant muscle atrophy occurs with 3-4 weeks of inactivity, but detraining accelerates quickly after that. If I need to wait longer than 4-5 weeks to go back to 2-plate bench presses and 3-plate squats, I might rethink the surgery entirely. Are my expectations unreasonable, even though they're consistent with the surgeon's instructions?

    For context, I have a much better than average tolerance for blunt trauma (bruises, muscle soreness, etc.) but a worse than average tolerance for stabbing/shooting pains. The surgeon claimed that post-op/recovery pain would feel like blunt trauma, "like taking a punch". He wants to do a bilateral laparoscopic mesh repair.
    What type of surgery, open or laparoscopic?
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  28. #1228
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    Originally Posted by Magnacromion View Post
    Longtime lurker, first-time poster. Thanks to all for the good info on hernia recovery.

    I've had bilateral inguinal hernias for 5-10 years now. They're mostly painless, but I'm finally getting around to having the surgery. I'm 27, so I probably don't want to go the rest of my life without having the surgery.

    For context, I have a much better than average tolerance for blunt trauma (bruises, muscle soreness, etc.) but a worse than average tolerance for stabbing/shooting pains. The surgeon claimed that post-op/recovery pain would feel like blunt trauma, "like taking a punch". He wants to do a bilateral laparoscopic mesh repair.
    Here's something that I've realized over the years that I've had a bilateral mesh hernia repair - you can lift heavy weights, and strain, and twist, and have a bulletproof abdomen. But you might feel like crap when you're not using it. The hernia repair industry seems to currently be focused on avoiding recurrence. Because that's their gauge, and it's measurable.

    The surgeons can't comprehend what it feels like to have mesh inside them unless they've had the repair. So when you talk about pain or being bothered by the mesh, they'll suggest pain pills.

    I've posted this before, but you should ask your surgeon if they've actually talked to a patient that was 80 or 90 or 100% satisfied that they made the right decision to have the surgery. It's incredible how many of them never hear from their patients again. They assume that they must be fine because of it.

    I've been asking the question on this forum, but have only heard from a few that are happy. They had the Progrip mesh used. Which is something else you should consider. What mesh, how much, confirmed good results. Even then, you might be one of the few whose body does not like mesh at all.

    Do lots of research before choosing. You'll live with your decision for the rest of your life, well beyond the 2 or 6 week "back to action " time.
    Last edited by SoccerAgain; 09-16-2017 at 07:53 PM.
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  29. #1229
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    I had the ProGrip mesh put in. Short term, I didn't use anything stronger than Tylenol for the first few days. Long term I think it depends on how your individual body reacts to what is essentially a foreign body inside of you.

    The one thing that the ProGrip has going for it is that there are no sutures, tacks, or staples used to secure it so there is nothing that might hit a nerve being put into you.

    I suppose only time will tell.
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    Originally Posted by Magnacromion View Post
    I've had bilateral inguinal hernias for 5-10 years now. They're mostly painless, but I'm finally getting around to having the surgery. I'm 27, so I probably don't want to go the rest of my life without having the surgery.

    I've spoken to two different surgeons about the procedure.

    He wants to do a bilateral laparoscopic mesh repair.
    You have lots of time to do research. Don't jump in. Every surgeon uses their own techniques and ideas. If you know what kind of life you want to lead afterward, keep looking until you find a surgeon who works on those types of people. I am serious, they all have their own methods.

    The no-mesh techniques are making a comeback. Take your time.
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