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  1. #31
    Registered User dnb's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by gbg View Post
    Just spoke to one of the Dr's I work with, asked him about Dr's not having patients do rehab after replacement surgery he said there are Dr's out there are not pro rehab although he woulld NEVER recommend it and it's not a wise choice.
    If I WANT rehab, I am sure my DOC would send me. I have been with this doc now
    thru 5 scope & clean knee surgeries including one McKay (sp?) procedure where they
    chip the tendon off your tibia, raise it and reattach it so the kneecap rides in a different
    plane. I have never had rehab thru any of these, or the hips.

    Rehab comes down to one primary thing only -- will you have the personal fortitude to
    do the exercises given you on a daily basis, and keep up the exercise. If not, you need
    a PT to kick your hiney regularly. That is not my problem. I can rehab quite well on my
    own. No need to kick my hiney.
    Last edited by dnb; 09-30-2009 at 04:31 PM.
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  2. #32
    Registered User dnb's Avatar
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    Hip Replacement Hints #2(a) -- At home

    The leg that has had the hip replacement is pretty much worthless when you go home.
    Sure you can put some pressure on it, but the muscles are all stretched and abused,
    and you will have various motion restrictions. My restrictions were:

    *No rotating of the toes in
    *No bending at the hip past 80 degrees
    *No initial weight bearing beyond 25%
    *No crossing of the legs

    The hardest part if you are not a 'back sleeper' will be getting used to sleeping on
    your back. And now that you are home, you will not have that hot sweaty hospital
    bed, but you also won't have those nice controls to raise your head and your feet
    either. Furthermore, you won't have the ability to raise or lower the whole bed to get
    in or out. Things get complex! (btw, the ONLY sheets you should use on your bed at
    home are the slickest ones you got. if you don't belive me try flannel and i bet you
    get them off before the day is out. right after you try your first set of exercises on them)

    Before I got home from both surgeries, we set up a sleeper in the living room with a
    matress on top of it. I am tall, and that gets the edge of the matress top about mid-
    thigh on me, a nice height for getting in and out. In addition, this also made it easy to
    get in and out from the foot of the bed. It is FAR FAR easier to use your tri's to
    scoot up the bed from the foot than to even begin to attempt to get into a bed side-
    ways. In addition, your significant other (if you have one) will be much happier without
    you keeping them up at night because...

    You will NOT sleep well. Take this as a given. In my first surgery, I could not
    roll over onto my side for about two weeks. Everything felt like it was tugging inside
    and out when I tried earlier. On the 2nd hip I was on my side within 2 days of coming
    home -- the 2nd surgery went that much easier. Either way, initially I was geting 2-3
    hour stretches of sleep, so having the internet or TV handy where you disturb no one
    else is a nice thing. You may even end up posting here at all hours!

    Stairs are an issue. If you get home PT (i did the first time for three visits though
    they spent more time talking than doing PT with me) they will teach you how to do them.
    Basically it is "up with the good, down with the bad" when it comes to which leg leads.
    In my case I did not have to do stairs, thankfully, as with the first surgery there was no
    way I could have for weeks. Second surgery I could do them the first week home.

    Getting around. With a bend restriction in place, normal chairs are a no-no.
    And low chairs, even if you can hold the 80 degree bend, are still a major hassle to
    get out of once you get in. SO, you will want to make sure you have somewhere to
    sit for eating and or reclining besides bed. I prefer bar stools and sitting at a high
    counter. And if you have a ways to travel within your home to say a bathroom or
    whatnot, you may want to have a bar stool there to sit on as well. Get these B4
    you go in, so you can find some that feel good and allow you to keep your leg at
    an 80 degree angle. And if you are used to sitting in some sort of recliner, get some
    big beefy hard pillows to raise the height. I should also add that in my home, I have
    no stairs to get in or out, only a 2 inch door lip. All my floors are hardwood, so there
    is no catching of crutches on carpeting. and if you have small bathroom rugs get rid
    of them unless they are VERY no-slip kinds of rugs. anything under a crutch that can
    move will, and wipe you out at the same time. Paper, a small rug, some food, the end
    of a blanket, etc. Falls can be bad -- luckily I have not had any...

    <more to come>
    Last edited by dnb; 10-01-2009 at 01:44 AM.
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  3. #33
    Registered User dnb's Avatar
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    Hip Replacement Hints #2(b) -- At home

    The Potty This is definitely one of the bigger challenges. With a bend
    restriction, you will definitely need something to raise the height of the toilet. There
    are a variety of diffeernt implements, from an elevated seat on 4 legs to a simple
    plastic donut that sits on top of the toilet and raises it some 5 inches or so. There
    are benefits to every type. If you have a roomy bathroom with no walls or grab-bars
    you will definitely want an elevated seat on it's own legs. Here I can tell you the WIDER
    the arms on the seat, the better. I have used (in the hospital) ones with narrow arms
    and ones with wide arms and can tell you the wider are much easier to adjust yourself
    upon and easier to get off of. In my case, we have a bathroom with a doorway on one
    side of the potty, and the shower stall on the other, so I went with a donut. I can grab
    the doorway and the shower stall for sitting down and getting up, so it works.

    I should add that, depending on how well your surgery goes, you may well want to keep
    a portable urinal by your bed that first week. Getting up can be so much effort that if
    you have to go in the middle of the night, the urinal is much easier.

    The Shower If you have a walk-in shower you are set. You can literally step
    over a small lip sideways with your crutches, stand them outside the shower and
    keeping most weight on your good leg, shower away. If all you have are bathtubs,
    you will DEFINITELY need a PT to show you how to get in and out, and may need to
    get a special seat that sits on the edge of the tub to help you in and out in the first
    week or two. I did not have to do this, so I have no specific comments here.
    Showering is a lot of work early on. Heck, everything is a lot of work early on. But
    here you will want to make sure you have a bed to sit on afterwards, or a bar stool,
    or something elevated. And since you will find it not so easy to bend over to get into
    drawers, you will want to set up your clothes in upper dresser drawers, or just on
    top of a dresser or table.

    Dressing for bed (and the day) Initially you may experience anywhere from
    moderate to severe swelling at the incision site, as well as plenty of bruising. Wearing
    underwear on this is uncomfortable. And of course while you are stuck sleeping (barely)
    on your back, any labels under your back rapidly become annoying. I found that getting
    oversized UnderArmour Heat shorts was the way to go. A few big pair are rather slick
    on your sheets, pull up nicely way higher than the waistband area, and are easy to get
    in and out of after showering. Sleeping in the buff is a great way to go as well, But
    by all means stay away from multiple layers below the waist -- you will be uncomfortable
    and getting in and out of them will be a big chore.

    Other ideas Here are few other things I have experienced hygiene-wise:

    1) You drop the soap in the shower, you will use shampoo as soap. Have 2 bars handy.
    2) A box of unscented moistened wipes is a blessing by your bed when you just want a
    quick facewash or hand wash.
    3) a garbagebag or can for trash by your bed is also quite handy.

    <more to come>
    Last edited by dnb; 09-30-2009 at 08:59 PM.
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  4. #34
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    Hip ReplacementHints #3 - Misc stuff


    This is just a collection of various things I have found, in no order, that have
    really helped me during my post-op recovery times.

    The Gripper I dunno what it is really called, but that thing below is a god-send
    for getting things done. I have used it to get my shorts on, get my socks off, pick up
    things I have dropped, open drawers, you name it. And that little yeller thing on top
    clips it to your crutch, so you can carry it around with you. It rattles when attached,
    but if you stick the metal end that sticks up into one of the lower adjusting holes, it
    will move and rattle less.



    Crutches Obviously a necessity, but having the ones with adjustable pins
    that pop in the bottom are just the best. They move an inch and, as you will find
    out, when you put shoes on you tend to grow...an inch. So the easy adjusting
    kind are way better for moving around from outside to inside environments.

    Crutches as chop sticks Okay, so you drop something,have no gripper, and
    can't bend over far enough to get it. Take your crutches, put the tips on either side
    of the item. Put the tops together flat. Grab the handles and squeeze. You should
    be able to grip and lift up whatever you dropped short of a greased pig.

    Sleeping on your side at night If you are like me, you will want to sleep on
    your side at night. I have found this works best for me, and you may want to
    try it as well. first, pillow between your legs, then roll to side. Then bend knees
    up a bit, and put another pillow under the fist pillow in front of your knees and in
    front ofyour stomach. This allows you to 'roll' over a little past center while the 2nd
    pillow keeps you from rolling too far, as well as keeps your upper (surgical) leg from
    sliding off the pillow between your legs.

    <more to come>
    Last edited by dnb; 10-01-2009 at 11:07 PM.
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  5. #35
    Registered User jam36's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    Hip Replacement Hints #2(a) -- At home

    The leg that has had the hip replacement is pretty much worthless when you go home.
    Sure you can put some pressure on it, but the muscles are all stretched and abused,
    and you will have various motion restrictions. My restrictions were:

    *No rotating of the toes in
    *No bending at the hip past 80 degrees
    *No initial weight bearing beyond 25%
    *No crossing of the legs

    The hardest part if you are not a 'back sleeper' will be getting used to sleeping on
    your back. And now that you are home, you will not have that hot sweaty hospital
    bed, but you also won't have those nice controls to raise your head and your feet
    either. Furthermore, you won't have the ability to raise or lower the whole bed to get
    in or out. Things get complex! (btw, the ONLY sheets you should use on your bed at
    home are the slickest ones you got. if you don't belive me try flannel and i bet you
    get them off before the day is out. right after you try your first set of exercises on them)

    Before I got home from both surgeries, we set up a sleeper in the living room with a
    matress on top of it. I am tall, and that gets the edge of the matress top about mid-
    thigh on me, a nice height for getting in and out. In addition, this also made it easy to
    get in and out from the foot of the bed. It is FAR FAR easier to use your tri's to
    scoot up the bed from the foot than to even begin to attempt to get into a bed side-
    ways. In addition, your significant other (if you have one) will be much happier without
    you keeping them up at night because...

    You will NOT sleep well. Take this as a given. In my first surgery, I could not
    roll over onto my side for about two weeks. Everything felt like it was tugging inside
    and out when I tried earlier. On the 2nd hip I was on my side within 2 days of coming
    home -- the 2nd surgery went that much easier. Either way, initially I was geting 2-3
    hour stretches of sleep, so having the internet or TV handy where you disturb no one
    else is a nice thing. You may even end up posting here at all hours!

    Stairs are an issue. If you get home PT (i did the first time for three visits though
    they spent more time talking than doing PT with me) they will teach you how to do them.
    Basically it is "up with the good, down with the bad" when it comes to which leg leads.
    In my case I did not have to do stairs, thankfully, as with the first surgery there was no
    way I could have for weeks. Second surgery I could do them the first week home.

    Getting around. With a bend restriction in place, normal chairs are a no-no.
    And low chairs, even if you can hold the 80 degree bend, are still a major hassle to
    get out of once you get in. SO, you will want to make sure you have somewhere to
    sit for eating and or reclining besides bed. I prefer bar stools and sitting at a high
    counter. And if you have a ways to travel within your home to say a bathroom or
    whatnot, you may want to have a bar stool there to sit on as well. Get these B4
    you go in, so you can find some that feel good and allow you to keep your leg at
    an 80 degree angle. And if you are used to sitting in some sort of recliner, get some
    big beefy hard pillows to raise the height. I should also add that in my home, I have
    no stairs to get in or out, only a 2 inch door lip. All my floors are hardwood, so there
    is no catching of crutches on carpeting. and if you have small bathroom rugs get rid
    of them unless they are VERY no-slip kinds of rugs. anything under a crutch that can
    move will, and wipe you out at the same time. Paper, a small rug, some food, the end
    of a blanket, etc. Falls can be bad -- luckily I have not had any...

    <more to come>
    To Dnb

    Hello,

    My name is Jason. I just read your post on bodybuilding forum from year 2009 regarding your hip replacement.

    It was very informative, and I appreciate you sharing your experiences. Also, the condition that you had as a teenager -- slipped epiphysis -- is a condition that I suffered as well. As a result, I've had "issues" with my hip since the age of 13, when I had my hips pinned.

    I was hoping you might be able to share some of your experiences with me involving how you managed your hip condition between when you had your hips pinned and up to the point that you had your hip replacements.

    I'm having a tough time trying to maintain an active lifestyle due to my hip problems. I am an avid weight-lifter, cyclist, boxer, and hiker, so I put my body (and hips) through a lot of stress.

    I am currently 36-years-old, and while my hip is not bad enough to replace yet, it's just a matter of time. Also, I had slipped eiphysis in both of my hips; the left hip was a mild slip; the right hip was a more severe slip. As a result, my right leg is about 1/2" shorter than the left, and my hip range of motion is restricted.

    Anyways,

    I'm interested in knowing how your hip problem affected you in your teenage years and into early adulthood. Did you have to avoid many activities? Did your hip problems affect your self-confidence? Also, without getting too personal, did your hips ever interfere with your sexual functioning, in terms of positions, etc.........

    Sorry this is so long.....It's just that my hip issues have been something that has affected me very deeply in so many ways ever since I was a kid, and it's nice to get feedback from somebody who had the same condition, especially from somebody who is active and into weight-lifting.

    Thanks a lot.......

    Jason
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  6. #36
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    Originally Posted by jam36 View Post
    To Dnb

    Hello,

    My name is Jason. I just read your post on bodybuilding forum from year 2009 regarding your hip replacement.

    It was very informative, and I appreciate you sharing your experiences. Also, the condition that you had as a teenager -- slipped epiphysis -- is a condition that I suffered as well. As a result, I've had "issues" with my hip since the age of 13, when I had my hips pinned.

    I was hoping you might be able to share some of your experiences with me involving how you managed your hip condition between when you had your hips pinned and up to the point that you had your hip replacements.

    I'm having a tough time trying to maintain an active lifestyle due to my hip problems. I am an avid weight-lifter, cyclist, boxer, and hiker, so I put my body (and hips) through a lot of stress.

    I am currently 36-years-old, and while my hip is not bad enough to replace yet, it's just a matter of time. Also, I had slipped eiphysis in both of my hips; the left hip was a mild slip; the right hip was a more severe slip. As a result, my right leg is about 1/2" shorter than the left, and my hip range of motion is restricted.

    Anyways,

    I'm interested in knowing how your hip problem affected you in your teenage years and into early adulthood. Did you have to avoid many activities? Did your hip problems affect your self-confidence? Also, without getting too personal, did your hips ever interfere with your sexual functioning, in terms of positions, etc.........

    Sorry this is so long.....It's just that my hip issues have been something that has affected me very deeply in so many ways ever since I was a kid, and it's nice to get feedback from somebody who had the same condition, especially from somebody who is active and into weight-lifting.

    Thanks a lot.......

    Jason
    well, I guess I can say I never really "managed" my life as a result of the surgery at 15 yrs old. I would say, though ti is a long time ago, that it took maybe 6 months to come fully back from that. I was able to do wind sprints in parking lots (car attendant in HS), but I was never a "runner" and never really liked running. I was able to downhill ski, and telemark ski until my knees started to give me too much pain that I just gave up skiing completely (around 44 yers old (50 now).

    I only had one hip (slipped) done, sounds like you had two. But I can tell you I always felt "stronger" on the one that wasn't done, though I think that was psychological more than anything else.

    My problems with needing a replacement began about 3.5 yrs ago with some intermittent pain that came and went as the flap of lining ****ed in the hip socket. I got progressively worse until I knew I had to be done and that was it. I jammed the 2nd one in 5 months later to take advantage of getting them both done in one year under a good insurance plan. Which, incidentally, I should say that is a pretty tight timeframe because what happens is... your 1st hip rehab slows to the progress of your 2nd hip in some respects.

    In general, I would say my teen surgery never prevented me from doing anything, didn;t have an effect on sexual function, or anything similar. I would play volleyball and dive on sand or hard floors, ski, swim, bike, you name it. OTOH, I was never a hardcore fitness enthuiast, just recreational so I know not what it would have been like if I did nore.

    right now, with two hips done, I can tell you my flexibility is great. I can squat pretty low, but can;t get up from that well(those muscles take longer to heal than one would think). Sitting for very long periods of time (like a recent 6 hour flight) eith minimal moving lesaves my 2nd leg sore in the creae area where all the little stabilizers are, but hip one is fine.

    I am happy to anywer any questions you have. I also wish to say that if you are having persistent pain issues, just get it done. Don;t put it off. It will not get better, and you will be in pain for no reason. Plus you will heal up much faster when you are younger as opposed to older.

    And finally, eveyones healing time is different, and their successes can be different. I know one guy who had his done from the front, and he was moving much better at 3 months than I did at 5 months. I know another woman who had one done, and she still has lots of issues. Hers is now 14 months past. So everything is individual.

    Just don;t wait. It really makes no sense, unless you want better weather to go walking in afterwards.
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  7. #37
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    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    rehab is a personal thing. if you know the exercises and DO them, you do not need
    rehab. just like following a good diet or exercise plan. if you skip what needs to be done
    you never get back 100%, same as a diet or exercise program.
    if you know the exercises and do them, by definition that is rehab, whether you choose to call it that or not.

    you acknowledge the need for the prescribed exercises for 100% recovery, yet in the middle of all that you say rehab is not necessary.

    physical and occupational therapy (rehab) starts from day one and like anything else you get out what you put in, assuming you have a capable surgeon.

    most people i've seen at the PTs definitely need someone standing over them putting them through the paces. those who are self motivated, can generally do most of the stuff at home or the gym and skip the copay.

    Call it what you want but the rehab/therapy is necessary.
    Handle every situation like a dog ....
    If you can't Eat it or Screw it ,
    Piss on it and Walk Away.
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  8. #38
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    Originally Posted by Black Sunday View Post
    if you know the exercises and do them, by definition that is rehab, whether you choose to call it that or not.

    you acknowledge the need for the prescribed exercises for 100% recovery, yet in the middle of all that you say rehab is not necessary.

    physical and occupational therapy (rehab) starts from day one and like anything else you get out what you put in, assuming you have a capable surgeon.

    most people i've seen at the PTs definitely need someone standing over them putting them through the paces. those who are self motivated, can generally do most of the stuff at home or the gym and skip the copay.

    Call it what you want but the rehab/therapy is necessary.
    My mention of "rehab" was the belief you have to go to see someone to get done what you need to get done, and that you cannot do it yourself. to that I say you can...

    avge recovery time from hip replacement is in the area of a year. for my first hip it was closer to 16 months because I did the 2nd one so soon after. The benfit is you are forced to use that first leg more to support the 2nd leg. the detriment is-- you are forced to use that leg to benefit the 2nd leg. Because you are somewhat limited each time, the 2nd leg slows final recovery of the first leg.

    So here I am now at roughly 18 months past hip one. The ONLY issue Ihave with that one is squatting, and mostly because my doc suggested I NOT do squats much. I don;t experience ANY pain or discomfort in that leg except for squatting. I imagine in the next few months, as I get back into a rowing(erg) regime that will disappear. And even that is not much at all.

    On leg two, if seated for too long I still get frontal groin pain a bit, but it is not horrendous. I also have the same squatting muscle issue as well. It is not roughly 14 months past that surgery. I have no complaints. I don;t feel restricted in ANYTHING I do, except squatting. I can walk, bike, swim, run a little (I hate running so I never even try), kick soccer balls, whatever. I expect that in the next few months most of that will be totally resolved as well.

    In the end, I got here on my own. Would "formal" therapy taken me any further faster? I have no idea. My one friend who has all kinds of issues surrounding her first hip replacement (she too will need a 2nd) has done plenty of formal PT. It is not doing her any good, her issues are her issues. Much of it is attributable to "body type", not PT, the surgery or anything else. I OTOH have had minimal issues.

    In the end, what works well for one may not work so well for others. I feel fortunate -- I have no residual issues. Things have all come together over time.

    It's funny how, when you have one of these done, you tend to notice or know plenty of others as well. I seem to know several people now who have been down this route. In the end (and I know I am repeating myself here) the concensus is:

    1) don;t put it off -- if you need it do it sooner as it is not gonna fix itself
    2) recover is around a year+/- (more plus)
    3) your journey will be yours -- I did two hips and each was different in terms of recovery and how much it wiped me out initially
    4) the hints I gave above will make your journey much easier in the beginning.
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  9. #39
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    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    My mention of "rehab" was the belief you have to go to see someone to get done what you need to get done, and that you cannot do it yourself. to that I say you can...
    Nothing I did in therapy, could not be duplicated at home and the gym, with the exception of the electro shock gizmo which i could buy if need be.


    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    In the end, I got here on my own. Would "formal" therapy taken me any further faster? I have no idea. My one friend who has all kinds of issues surrounding her first hip replacement (she too will need a 2nd) has done plenty of formal PT. It is not doing her any good, her issues are her issues. Much of it is attributable to "body type", not PT, the surgery or anything else. I OTOH have had minimal issues.
    Depends on your motivation and the therapist. I had a bi-lateral resurfacing done three days apart. as soon as they figured out how much weight i could bear, i was doing laps around the nursing home.

    Not sure why you're so hung up on this formal versus informal therapy, but i was listening to the radio one day and they (forget who exactly so let's just say health care professionals) mentioned that most people would be just as well off going to a session or two, learning the prescribed exercises and doing them at home. Save your money, or use it to buy a gym membership.

    My own feeling is that the biggest problem area in therapy might be the stretching. not necessarily with the hips, but any operation where the scar tissue needs to be broken up after surgery. That can be painful and i can see where people would not push themselves to do this properly.

    Had me doing leg press and body weight squats during pt. Don't like the leg press, seems to put too much pressure on my abs. Started doing light squats at six or seven months, maybe sooner, I recall doing goblet squats at home.

    I do back and front squats once a week light weight either a ten by ten german volume style or about as many as i can with a light weight up to about thirty reps , then adding a little weight each set. Number of sets depends on whether or not i'm working. Need my legs at work, so i can't turn them into mush.
    Handle every situation like a dog ....
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    Piss on it and Walk Away.
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    My wife now 75 had hers replaced 2 years ago
    She can walk as much as she wants but her jogging days are over--real shame as she was placing 2 and 3 in half marathons in her age group

    Can bike no problem

    Does 10 to 15 miles when we go to PA Dutch country on Saturdays
    I know muscle has a memory but I think mine has Alzheimers
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    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    Okay, so I am facing definitely one hip replacement in April, and will probably
    do the other by early next year. No regrets, I just seem to have various
    joint issues. So it goes....

    Anyway, is anyone doing squats after hip replacement? What are you NOT
    able to do anymore?

    In my case I will get the 'new and improved' metal on metal 'big ball' joint.
    WOO-HOO! At least I know it won;t wear away for the rest of my life.

    Thanks Mucho!

    Dan
    My younger sister has had 2 hip replacements and my mother has had THREE. I worked with both extensively on leg training and this is what I FOUND.... Neither can do a SLDL due to the rotation from the hip and keeping the back straight. BOTH can do squats but we modify them with smith machine or bodyweight squats. They each had to relearn how to squat by holding a bar and sitting back onto a bench. Leg press works great for both of them and if you have access to a squat press machine they seem to be better for angle. Anything else? Lunges my sister can do but mom has trouble with it. NO free weight lunges or squats though.

    Take it slow and easy and deal with form and you should be ok.
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    Registered User jam36's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    well, I guess I can say I never really "managed" my life as a result of the surgery at 15 yrs old. I would say, though ti is a long time ago, that it took maybe 6 months to come fully back from that. I was able to do wind sprints in parking lots (car attendant in HS), but I was never a "runner" and never really liked running. I was able to downhill ski, and telemark ski until my knees started to give me too much pain that I just gave up skiing completely (around 44 yers old (50 now).

    I only had one hip (slipped) done, sounds like you had two. But I can tell you I always felt "stronger" on the one that wasn't done, though I think that was psychological more than anything else.

    My problems with needing a replacement began about 3.5 yrs ago with some intermittent pain that came and went as the flap of lining ****ed in the hip socket. I got progressively worse until I knew I had to be done and that was it. I jammed the 2nd one in 5 months later to take advantage of getting them both done in one year under a good insurance plan. Which, incidentally, I should say that is a pretty tight timeframe because what happens is... your 1st hip rehab slows to the progress of your 2nd hip in some respects.

    In general, I would say my teen surgery never prevented me from doing anything, didn;t have an effect on sexual function, or anything similar. I would play volleyball and dive on sand or hard floors, ski, swim, bike, you name it. OTOH, I was never a hardcore fitness enthuiast, just recreational so I know not what it would have been like if I did nore.

    right now, with two hips done, I can tell you my flexibility is great. I can squat pretty low, but can;t get up from that well(those muscles take longer to heal than one would think). Sitting for very long periods of time (like a recent 6 hour flight) eith minimal moving lesaves my 2nd leg sore in the creae area where all the little stabilizers are, but hip one is fine.

    I am happy to anywer any questions you have. I also wish to say that if you are having persistent pain issues, just get it done. Don;t put it off. It will not get better, and you will be in pain for no reason. Plus you will heal up much faster when you are younger as opposed to older.

    And finally, eveyones healing time is different, and their successes can be different. I know one guy who had his done from the front, and he was moving much better at 3 months than I did at 5 months. I know another woman who had one done, and she still has lots of issues. Hers is now 14 months past. So everything is individual.

    Just don;t wait. It really makes no sense, unless you want better weather to go walking in afterwards.
    Thanks for the response. I appreciate the additional insight. Besides a hip replacement, reconstructive hip surgery has often been mentioned to me as an alternative operation. The benefit of this type of surgery would be no artificial parts to wear out and not as many activity restrictions. The bad part would be if the surgery failed to improve the condition and/or made the problem worse, at which point I'd have to have a hip replacement to fix things anyways.

    As of now, I'm doing OK in terms of functioning. But I'm not 100%, and it's when I compare myself to the people who are 100% that I start to really feel bad and get depressed.

    Right now I'm working on keeping my leg muscles and overall health strong. My left leg, the side that had the minimal slip, is much stronger than my right side, the side with the severe slip. Even my left thigh is bigger and more defined than my right side. And the bottoms of my shoes show abnormal wear patterns.....

    Anyways, it's great to have this thread going. One more thing: Did you ever consider having hip resurfacing done instead of a traditional hip replacement? I know that hip resurfacing is not always an option for people who have abnormally shaped femoral heads or unusual hip joint anatomy. Hip resurfacing sounds promising, but I don't think I would qualify as my right hip is too deformed. But it sounds like you are doing great with a traditional type of hip replacement...........
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    Originally Posted by LyingSac View Post
    hey Dan,aren't you kinda young for one of those....you musta gave it hell in your younger days eh?I'll put it this way,if it can be done,you will be the man to do it.......carry on....Roy
    I had the same procedure done two years ago (I was 49 at the time). All I was told not to do is return to running (I was a competitive runner). I still do low impact cardio and weight training.

    Will
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    Thumbs up

    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    Okay, so I am facing definitely one hip replacement in April, and will probably
    do the other by early next year. No regrets, I just seem to have various
    joint issues. So it goes....

    Anyway, is anyone doing squats after hip replacement? What are you NOT
    able to do anymore?

    In my case I will get the 'new and improved' metal on metal 'big ball' joint.
    WOO-HOO! At least I know it won;t wear away for the rest of my life.

    Thanks Mucho!

    Dan
    Dan I had my left hip replaced, front approach procedure , 1 1/2 years ago. I was back to BB squats within a couple of months. Determination and desire took over. My surgeon promised me I would be able to. I returned to all of my leg workout exercises. I recently had my right one done, and I'm expecting the same results. ,
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    quick note here: DO NOT SKIMP ON THE REHAB.

    Also, if you are worried about scars go to a plastic surgeon and get a series of Fraxel/Resurfacing and Broad Band Light laser treatments. Best thing to knock out scars, Fraxel breaks them up and BBL makes the discoloration go away. Five or six treatments speeds up the scar healing by about a year or so, makes the scars flat and white.

    disclaimer: I have not had this surgery, but many of my friends have. We all used to dance semiprofessionally or professionally and are 30+. I have had the laser treatments on a scar and they are worth every penny.
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    Total hip Replacement with femur lengthening

    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    Okay, so I am facing definitely one hip replacement in April, and will probably
    do the other by early next year. No regrets, I just seem to have various
    joint issues. So it goes....

    Anyway, is anyone doing squats after hip replacement? What are you NOT
    able to do anymore?

    In my case I will get the 'new and improved' metal on metal 'big ball' joint.
    WOO-HOO! At least I know it won;t wear away for the rest of my life.

    Thanks Mucho!

    Dan
    HI Dan
    I had mine done Feb 17th 2016 with a femur lengthening using robotics at HSS in NYC with Dr Seth Jerabek
    had a traditional surgery cut muscles on glutes.... I too have to have other side done...BUT
    I left the hospital thursday at 12 and by 4pm I was in the gym on the blike and tmill for an hour every day
    Started training upper body in a eek drove in 6 days and started 1/2 body weight after 6 weeks. 1 year later I am almost squatting the same amount I was injured and although I need to add size to hams my legs are 100 million percent.. so check with your dr but I was cleared after 13 weeks to goooooo for it...I competed in August after being cleard for legs in May $th Place Qualifying for Nationals! Dr. Jerabek said after 1 year no restrictions at all..Another show coming up..

    Squat away just check with dr first
    Suzy
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    Originally Posted by dnb View Post
    Okay, so I am facing definitely one hip replacement in April, and will probably
    do the other by early next year. No regrets, I just seem to have various
    joint issues.
    Dan
    Thank you so much for all your posts in this thread.
    I'm just wondering how you're going 10+ years later?
    Any more advice you can give? Did you have to get it re-done? Do you still have metal on metal or did you change to Ceramic-on-metal?

    I need my hips done as well, I'm 33 and struggling mentally with it.
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