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arkangel
02-14-2003, 11:51 PM
My first real serious piece of exercise equipment was a Soloflex. I still have a great sense of admiration for it. When I use it... it renders a serious workout with lots of options.
Since then, I still look back at the website, from time to time, to see what they have added.
Has anyone purchased their dumbells... how do you like them? They look great on the website. I have the machine and the Rock-It.
Hell, I know that Soloflex stuff is expensive, but call me nostalgic or just frugal (I paid a lot of money for the equipment)... but I'd like to talk to anyone who still works with the Soloflex equipment...
Thanks...

Arkangel
Oakland/CA
TRAVEN8@HOTMAIL.COM

T1one
06-22-2003, 09:23 AM
I still exclusively use my Soloflex and its great

MiloMan
06-22-2003, 01:13 PM
Soloflex equipment is inferior to free weights, but it is still a whole lot better than no equipment at all.

Roadsterz
06-22-2003, 06:20 PM
I owned a soloflex for several years and if you are limited on space and cannot go to a gym it is a great piece of equipment. It will defintely keep you tone. However, free weights are simply better at building muscle. I have not seen the dumbells that are offered. I bought a set Power Blocks www.powerblocks.com they are a little pricey but worth the money.

MiloMan
06-22-2003, 07:09 PM
Originally posted by Roadsterz
It will defintely keep you tone.
Tone/definition/cut = low bodyfat

TwoWalks
06-22-2003, 10:49 PM
Originally posted by MiloMan
Tone/definition/cut = low bodyfat

I think low body fat will give a person definition but exercise and working out will tone the muscle. If it is not worked it will be soft not toned.

DLift
06-22-2003, 11:08 PM
I started lifting about 9 months ago using a used Soloflex I bought locally very cheap. I used it for about 3 months with the straps, then I switched to using it with normal weights. I just slide a barbell through the lever arm and secure weights at both ends with spin locks. I've been very happy with using it this way. It approximates the feel of free weights with the safety I need working out at home with no spotter. Soloflex says you can add up to 500lbs this way.

BTW, a lot of Soloflex and accessories are available on EBay.

MiloMan
06-22-2003, 11:11 PM
Originally posted by TwoWalks
I think low body fat will give a person definition but exercise and working out will tone the muscle. If it is not worked it will be soft not toned.
I disagree, but as always, you can think whatever you like. It's not my job to convert you to anything.

Roadsterz
06-23-2003, 06:23 AM
MiloMan,

Just look at some pictures taken of men and women in Uganda or any other thrid world country and you will see that without proper nutrition and resistence training it doesn't matter how low your body fat is, you are not going to have a musclular/toned/defined body. It's a combination of nutrition and resistence training. One cannot acheive the desired look either if there diet is lacking or their resistence training is lacking.

TwoWalks
06-23-2003, 08:37 AM
Originally posted by MiloMan
I disagree, but as always, you can think whatever you like. It's not my job to convert you to anything.

MiloMan, I am not so quick to believe that we disagree, I think that often we use a different defintion or view of the same thing.

My idea of Toned is a muscle that is full, developed and solid. A muscle that is not worked atrophies so is not toned. At least in the way I view it. Defintion and cut is totally the result of low body fat, I agree. I would ask, what your defintion of Toned is as used in your original statement?

JV63
06-23-2003, 08:43 AM
From a website I came across:

Being toned or being defined means only one thing. It is when you have muscle, and when you have a low enough body fat so that this muscle can be seen. So, the less fat you have covering your muscles, the more "tone" and "definition" you will appear to have. Sounds simple, right? Well, apparently it's not simple. People still can't figure out how to get more toned and defined. One of my favorite bull**** gym phrases is "I work out with lighter weights and do higher reps so I can get more toned." News flash buddy, working out with lighter weight for more reps is doing nothing for you in terms of getting more "toned and defined."

Working out with heavy weights for less reps will have the exact same effect when it comes to "tone and definition." It does NOT "tone and define" you! Working out with weights, whether they are light or heavy, low reps or high reps, does one thing and one thing only, it builds and strengthens muscle. But, didn't we just figure out that to be more toned and defined you just had to lose more fat? YES we did! Therefore, when it comes to looking more toned and defined, weightlifting doesn't have anything to do with it!

And if you think this whole light weights with high reps thing is a stupid myth, how about this next one. "I don't work out with free weights like dumbbells and barbells because I'm not looking to get huge, I use mostly machines now to tone and define me." This one is a classic! People seem to think that machines use magical powers that free weights don't have.

They think a machine will help tone you, while free weights will only add muscle and bulk. Hate to ruin the ending for you, but this is once again, complete and total bull****! Be it free weights or machines, neither one of them is having any effect in terms of "tone and definition."

Remember what we learned before? To get more toned and defined, you just need to get rid of more of the fat that is covering your muscles. Sure you need to do some weightlifting in order to have the muscle part of this equation, but that is all the weightlifting is doing. Therefore, high reps or low reps, light weight or heavy weight, machines or free weights, none of these are a factor when it comes to the almighty "tone and definition."

Some people must be scratching their heads right now wondering what in the hell will actually get them more toned and defined. The answer to this question is extremely simple. To get more toned and defined, you have to lose more of the fat that is covering your muscles, and the only way, and let me repeat this, THE ONLY WAY to lose fat from any part of your body is through your diet and by doing enough cardio exercise (jogging, riding a bike, etc.). That's it right there, nothing more to it.

Since I hate the words "toned" and "defined," and since I have probably said those words about 100 times during this article, hopefully I never have to use those words ever again. But, this doesn't rule out all of the words I hate. Don't even get me started on "sculpt" and "sculpting your muscles," that's a whole other article altogether! lol

TwoWalks
06-23-2003, 11:33 AM
Originally posted by JV63
From a website I came across:

Being toned or being defined means only one thing. It is when you have muscle, and when you have a low enough body fat so that this muscle can be seen.

Even the greatest of answers can leave behind many questions. Great article and I have little disagreement if any with it. I did not and do not feel that lifting weights is the secret or key to defined or cut, and the article says that it does not. The article says that weight lifting with free weight or with machine etc does not tone but that toned is the fat being off the muscle so the muscle shows, and I can also agree with that.

So where does my disagreement come in and why did I make the statement I did about exercise = toned, simple really at least in my mind.

If diet only, a person will lose body fat and they will also lose muscle mass. If these two happen at the same rate you will continue to lose scale weight but you will not lose body fat%. If you couple resistance exercise along with the weight loss, you will lose body fat% and the result will be to have muscle that shows because of the lower body fat% so you will reach the ideal of toned.

Now to give one to Milo Man, I think that no matter the goal - muscle mass - fat loss or the balance of each the main ingredient is diet.

Oh and as far as terms I use a lot but hate - "Diet" because it has become the excepted term for crash weight loss. Nutrition is a far better term, even if the term diet means "food consumed or lack there of".

Roadsterz
06-23-2003, 05:02 PM
I think the terms"toned" and "defined" mean different things to different people. They are very subjective terms. When someone says " I want to be more tone and defined" they probably should be saying "I am fat and need to lose some weight so that my muscle will show through and I will look good in the mirror" Diet and cardio are indeed ways to accomplish this but there has to be some type of resistence training in addition to diet and cardio(actually cardio is not even needed if your diet is right), to build an adequate amount of muscle. It does not have to be weight lifting but in some form you must lift weight. Whether you load boxes on a truck or you are a mountain climber.

arkangel
06-23-2003, 09:49 PM
Lord, aren't there enough exercise machines that have come along since the Soloflex came into existance... not to mention machines like the Universal and such that came before.
While I have moved on, or back, to using a Smith-Machine and freeweights, I still use my Soloflex several times per week.
Home fitness, as a concept, is still a battlefield, and I have looked in on the war consistantly. The more I see, from Norditrack's "wanna-be's", to far more expensive machines at places like Copelands Sports... the more I think that the tried and true, Soloflex can and still will get people in great shape.
Will it outperform a Universal-type machine, meant for the gym???... probabily not as well, but it you take into account, the portability, the quality of the steel, and all the options... you can't really complain too much. Not many other machines can switch from the "bands" to free weights that easily... not many machines break down and can be reassembled and moved about that well.
I'm not trying to sell it, but the Soloflex website has some new options, these days... everything from really great dumb bells, to a universal bar that is really a well engineered piece of work. They've gotten into free weights well and support their products equally as well. Yeah, it's kind of Yuppie... but if you had the cash, and wanted to stack up your home gym with the best stuff... you can't do much better than this.
Oddly enough, I have been monitoring all the fuss over this new "Cross-bow" machine, that emulates the Bowflex. I've even gone into the Nordiflex shop and goofed with it. I bought a bowflex four years ago, for very specific purposes-- to augment my Soloflex workout-- and folks, the "Cross Bow" might be cheaper, but the options are not there.
The Soloflex has not be copied, at least to my knowledge. I think it would be pretty hard to copy their design and do it half as well.
Are there any Tri-Max people out there??? I looked at the Tri-Max and thought it was a great design!!! But, in the end, I chose the Soloflex because I thought we'd grow old together... and I'm pretty sure we will.
Yeah, I love free weights and my Nautilus machine. I'm pretty convinced, no matter how well thought out and engineered both the Soloflex and Bowflex are, that my results with "frees" will be quicker and more honestly obtained.
But I'm giving out a large round of applause to my Soloflex, anyway... I still believe anyone can get a good, safe, and productive workout with this machine, and I think that the parent company has really improved the product and surrounded it with both the dumb bells, universal bar, the Rock-It (tremendous for your legs!!!) and equally useful and wellbuilt stations to keep your Soloflex gear stashed and accessable (and neat too).
Like most consummers, I guess we're all looking for the next great innovations... and we are sometimes a little too quick to dismiss what was built well and still works well.
I'd love to chat with anyone who wants to talk about the Soloflex, Bowflex, Tri-max and even the Nordiflex-Gold. Let's swap a few stories and experiences.
Have a great workout, and be healthy.

Arkangel
Traven8@hotmail.com

MiloMan
06-23-2003, 10:38 PM
Originally posted by arkangel
I guess we're all looking for the next great innovations... and we are sometimes a little too quick to dismiss what was built well and still works well
Exactly, like the old reliable power rack, adjustable bench, and Olympic barbell set. It's always worked, and it always will.

T1one
06-24-2003, 07:03 AM
As I said before my working out with the Soloflex is great.
Do anyone know why some people say that you can not build mass with it?
Isn't resistance, resistance?
I thought as long as you can progressively overload your muscles by adding more straps and or weights (a plus for Soloflex), along with proper nutrition, one can create the enviroment for growth to happen.
Can someone explain.
Thank You in advance for your time and response.

Roadsterz
06-24-2003, 07:48 AM
....Certainly you can create mass with the Soloflex. I don't think anyone is saying that you can't. At the same time, I think most everyone will agree that there really is no substitute for free weights as far as adding mass systematically and efficiently. For example, for those that have the bowflex. Try building large quads by sitting down on the Bowflex with a belt arounf your waist using the power rods. Even if you have the maximum weight of 405lbs. It's just not the same as squatting. I don't think that there is any equal substitute for the squat.

TwoWalks
06-24-2003, 09:10 AM
Originally posted by Roadsterz
....Certainly you can create mass with the Soloflex. I don't think anyone is saying that you can't. At the same time, I think most everyone will agree that there really is no substitute for free weights as far as adding mass systematically and efficiently. For example, for those that have the bowflex. Try building large quads by sitting down on the Bowflex with a belt arounf your waist using the power rods. Even if you have the maximum weight of 405lbs. It's just not the same as squatting. I don't think that there is any equal substitute for the squat.

My son owned the soloflex and fantastic machine. I also own a bowflex and think within its realm it is a great piece of equipment. But for shear mass and thickness, free weights are king and will always rule. Even within the exercises done with free weights there is the same division. Isolation exercises and compound exercises. Compound exercises are king when it comes to mass and thickness.

arkangel
06-24-2003, 09:03 PM
Hey folks,
Yeah, I hear ya.
I own a Bowflex and because I'm not trying to bulk up, spefically, I find that when I want to stay consistant, and keep my muscles working and don't have enough time to really pound, it really jumps in and does the job. I can't say, even when I began to research it that I planned to depend upon it to shoulder the whole burden of getting in shape. I bought it to augment the exercises on the Soloflex that were a pain to pull together.
I like that the Bowflex isn't confined, in terms of how far you can pull up or down. or around. While I feel you can't bulk up on the machine, you can jump on it and keep yourself straight... in a small piece of time.
I was chunky and overweight... one of my goals was to just get strong without bulking up. Both the Soloflex and the Bowflex keeps me strong without stressing me out too much. I plan to convert more to free weights when I feel I've arrived at particular muscle tone and general strength.
The hard part of free weights is learning, all over again, to use all the barbells and adjusting to another way of picking the weight up and putting it back. That's the good thing about most of these machines... no spotter needed... no bars you have to push off your chest. I'm getting better with the dumb bells.
Here's a question... do you guys like the Hex-weights, that are already set and calibrated, or do you guys like load your own???
Has anyone tried that new compound bar from Soloflex yet???

Arkangel

MiloMan
06-24-2003, 09:33 PM
Originally posted by arkangel
I plan to convert more to free weights when I feel I've arrived at particular muscle tone and general strength.
If you switch to free weights now, you'll arrive at that point sooner than you would otherwise.

As far as the DB workouts go, this is a mighty good full-body DB program, you can use it as a rough idea and modify it as you like:

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/workmonth1.htm

Hex or adjustable DBs?

If I was short on cash, I'd use the trusty spin-lok DBs. If I had some money to spend, I'd buy a 5-50 lb set (pairs, in 5 lb increments) of hex DBs and a rack to put them on. A local shop had that combo for the nice price of 300 bucks (just in time to make a fine junior high grad present for my niece, along with an adjustable bench).

If you need DBs larger than 50 lb (she didn't), they are usually about 35-40 cents per lb. Buy them locally, of course, since the shipping kills you on mail-order plates and DBs. If you buy a bunch of them, you generally get a discount, and a 5-120 lb set of hex DBs (racks not included, but bargain for the racks when you buy the set) should probably set you back ~$1,000 or a little less. Just bring your own truck to haul them (maybe in more than one load, as that set would tip the scales at 3,000 pounds).

More money than adjustables and plates, but I do hate changing plates.

MiloMan
06-24-2003, 09:41 PM
Originally posted by arkangel
Has anyone tried that new compound bar from Soloflex yet?
No, but I picked one up at a garage sale, and it seemed light-duty to me. It's awfully expensive for what you get. This is a thread over in the workout equipment forum:

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=80891

T1one
06-25-2003, 02:05 PM
For you Soloflex users out there, I thought you would like to know that there is Soloflex users group, that you might be interested in and need members to join.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SoloflexUsers/

arkangel
06-25-2003, 11:51 PM
Now that's interesting... the compound bar??? How much did you pay for it??? I've seen the price Soloflex wants for one... I'd be interested in how much you paid.
Thanks for the Soloflex website... I'm going to check it out.

Arkangel

thunderchild
03-16-2005, 05:15 PM
How is the Soloflex workout going? I have a Soloflex and a Rockit. I get a great workout from them. I am not trying to become huge, just to get some definition and get into shape. The machine will definitely build strength. And my endurance during exercises has drastically increased. Hope all is well.

pianoguy62
03-21-2005, 07:49 AM
Re MiloMan: once you buy db's above, say, 50 lbs., small magnetic plates are a godsend. Instead of separately buying 55's, 65's, etc., just slap a pair of 2.5-lb. magnetics on each end of 50's, 60's etc.. Much cheaper and saves a lotta space (and hauling around when you're moving). I think I bought mine at fractionalplates.com, but have also seen them elsewhere. The 1.25-lb. plates are useful, too (for increasing weight gradually at a constant rep scheme).

badmashii
05-06-2005, 11:11 AM
i use to have a bowflex that was purchased brand new. i didn't really enjoy owning the unit since the workouts were unconventional. the rubbing of the steel cables on the forearms became annoying, the locking rod kept rubbing on the bench rail, and i didnt like anything that uses steel cables (total gym). also, the bowflew required too much horizontal space for the bending of the rods to the side. eventually, the bowflex broke when the locking nut on the pulley bolt failed and the pulley flew across the room and dented the ceiling. if anybody was nearby, it would have smacked someone in the face. the overall design is quite dangerous considering a single nut and bolt is holding down 100s of pounds of resistance on each side.

now i have a soloflex i found locally for $100 delivered. the unit is solid steel with simple moving parts. the design is very conventional with a bench. it comes with 200+lbs of resistance and you can optionally load standard dumbell weights. i figured $100 used is equal to 2 months of gym membership, so i rather have something i could keep.

jaguarr
05-06-2005, 11:20 AM
They're called "free weights" because they will set you free. ;)

jag, freeweight zealot...

enforcer237
05-08-2005, 07:28 AM
I picked up an old soloflex 12 years ago from a friend of mine that was going to toss it. It was old when he gave it to me but still functioned. I invested in a new bench cover and some additional weight bands and it became a supplimentary piece of fitness equipment. I still use it sometimes when I can't make it to the gym. It lets me get a good workout in and adds variety to my freeweight and hammer strength workouts.

thunderchild
10-14-2005, 09:36 AM
I have been using my Soloflex for over a year now. Lost about 25 lbs. It works very well for me. Space is a constraint and I like the simplicity of it. I can do all the excercises I need and i use it everyday. As I said before, I am not trying to look like Hercules! But Apollo or Mercury will do. I have great tone and like the build I am gitting. And yes it does build muscle! Not like my older free weight days but I am pleased with the results.

Estopell
10-18-2005, 07:21 AM
No disrespect intended but you could have reached the same point in 3 months with a pair of adustable dumbells and a bench. I have no doubt, you have more than peaked with Soloflex and you are presently wasting time using it.

Hey-Iwas51
10-18-2005, 03:08 PM
No disrespect intended but you could have reached the same point in 3 months with a pair of adustable dumbells and a bench. I have no doubt, you have more than peaked with Soloflex and you are presently wasting time using it.

No disrespect from me either, but if someone has still not maxed out on the resisitance capacity of the machine won't they still be able to grow mass? I am curious as to why you think not...

I understand that steadying free weights allows the supporting muscles more loads, but are those loads really that significant until you get into really heavy lifting, beyond what a SoloFlex can handle? I am just curious... I really want to understand. Maybe I am waisting my time???

I have been using a Weider Cross Bow (Platinum 600) for a while (6 months) now... This model is different from the Weider Cross Bow that was a direct knock off of the Bow Flex... This one does not have multiple bows (the original Cross Bow did, just like the Bow Flex). It gives a pretty consistent load throughout the motion. You are only bending one bow though, like flexing a hunting bow, then there is a series of cams and pulleys.

I finally tried a Bow Flex out at Sears the other day and was amazed at how much the load increased over the full range of motion. I did not like it at all. Started out with no load and maybe got to about 60 percent of the full load half way through the motion... NOT like my Cross Bow at all, smoother motion, but the Bow Flex loaded you up only at the end of the stroke.

Dan

thunderchild
10-19-2005, 06:56 AM
Well, I am sure I am not wasting my time. I can add all the resistance bands I need to increase the weight. It is still an ass kicking machine if you know how to use it correctly. I have all the resistance I need for now and the future. You cannot do pullups with dumbbells! The machine offers a host of excercises you can do that just the bells and a bench don't offer. Check it out first before you condemn it. Like I said before, it offers everything I need for my workouts. And I doubt the losing 25 pounds in 3 months without some serious dieting. I like to cook and eat so everything is working OK for me.

pray4chicken
06-02-2009, 08:17 PM
My first real serious piece of exercise equipment was a Soloflex. I still have a great sense of admiration for it. When I use it... it renders a serious workout with lots of options.
Since then, I still look back at the website, from time to time, to see what they have added.
Has anyone purchased their dumbells... how do you like them? They look great on the website. I have the machine and the Rock-It.
Hell, I know that Soloflex stuff is expensive, but call me nostalgic or just frugal (I paid a lot of money for the equipment)... but I'd like to talk to anyone who still works with the Soloflex equipment...
Thanks...

Arkangel
Oakland/CA
TRAVEN8@HOTMAIL.COM


yes i've had mine for a month and love it. paid $200 for it off craigslist.

subdude
12-20-2009, 10:24 AM
I still exclusively use my Soloflex and its great Soloflex has been part of my fitenss for years. 48 yrs young and counting. If I was a muscle building guy it has some limitations for good solid anaerobic burn that is simple, and SAFE it is superb!!!

FatGymRat
12-20-2009, 09:22 PM
My friends Dad had one of these when I was in HS....

I could honestly say this...
If I lived in an apartment building with nice hardwood flooring so that I couldn't realistically use free weights, I would hang my wet clothes on a Soloflex so they could dry out while I was at the gym working out.

paolo59
12-20-2009, 11:25 PM
For the price, I believe you can do better on a piece of more or less pricey home workout equipment. That's just me!

ironwill2008
12-21-2009, 09:53 AM
In a few weeks, this site, and this forum in particular, will be over-run with threads like this old relic. I want to make one thing clear to all the newbs. If your goal is bodybuilding, this gizmo is not the best path:

http://i288.photobucket.com/albums/ll191/ironwill2008/soloflex.jpg

If you don't want the expense of a power rack, Olympic set, and FID bench, get a gym membership.

If you want more info on setting up an effective home gym, look here:

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/forumdisplay.php?f=26

pharmamarketer
11-28-2010, 07:48 PM
well I guess you used the search feature

Tensolator
04-03-2016, 04:22 AM
I have owned the same Soloflex for twenty-nine years. I do not regret making that purchase.

Bo_Flecks
04-03-2016, 07:23 AM
I have owned the same Soloflex for twenty-nine years. I do not regret making that purchase.

Has it been the primary workout (resistance) that you have used over the last 29 years? If so, I would be very interested to see the physique you have built with it over nearly 3 decades of training on it.

pastorgbc
04-03-2016, 07:36 AM
Could I get the same gains on the Soloflex as I do with my Bullworker?

Hooverville
04-03-2016, 04:59 PM
Oh lawd.

bisonp
02-13-2017, 02:31 PM
I started out in highschool on a DP Megaflex, a Soloflex knockoff. It did OK for what I needed out of it until the bands broke. Once one of the 50s broke it was essentially useless and I gave it away.

After I bought my first house I decided to get serious and get a used Soloflex. Hey, it was the 90's and I wasn't that bright when it came to lifting. Anyway, it was a pretty solid piece of equipment but most of the exercises were a PITA. Bench was too high and too short, wiggling under the bar to bench press, the progressive resistance, fixed motion path, etc. But again I got what I needed out of it for a couple years until, once again, bands started breaking. That's also about the time I discovered this site (yeah, I've been lurking on and off for a loooong time). I then went with a cage and dumbbells and haven't looked back. Still better than a Bowflex, with better quality, bodyweight movements, and ability to add weight plates, but not something I'd recommend to anybody.

One thing still bugs me though. Soloflex claims the rubber bands are easier on joints than real weight. I'm pretty skeptical about that claim because #1, weight lifting is not an impact sport and #2, it's a machine that doesn't move in a natural motion. So I don't believe it yet they still claim it today so they must have something to back it up, right? Just curious if there's anything to that.

ironwill2008
02-13-2017, 03:26 PM
This older-than-dirt thread's premise was dumb when it was originally posted, and it hasn't gotten one iota better in the past 14 years.






smh............................