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sto0le
02-12-2003, 11:13 PM
hello everyone here on the 35+ board..., again i am only 19 but i enjoy posting here due to the lack of maturity on the teen bb board and the amount of expierience you all have over them (and me :)

im curious if anyone has ever come across a chart where someone has tried to calculate the optimum balance for muscle developing on the body, for example..

say the heaviest possible weight i could lift in any shape or form would be a squat, say i do 100 lbs (this is an example:), now since thats the heaviest i can lift ill consider that 100%.
now lets say my calve needs to be roughly 30% as strong as the muscles i use in that squat, so i need to be lifting 30 lbs (30% of 100) with my calves in order to keep the muscles in balance.

so basically with this 'chart' you could incrimentally increase the weight and gain muscle evenly, so if i slapped 10 lbs on my squat, id have to slap 3 lbs on my calve raises, get the picture?

it was just something that crossed my mind earlier..just like to hear your guys(and gals) thoughts! thanks!

Phatman1179
02-13-2003, 07:32 AM
I know of charts that help you figgure your 1 rep max, is this what you are looking for?

sto0le
02-13-2003, 09:30 AM
no not quite, i was thinking more like a chart that helps you balance the growth of muscle..so you dont get like big biceps and little legs, etc

Minotaur
02-13-2003, 10:31 AM
That's a good question, and a good concern, but I don't know that anything like that exists. It really comes down to common sense.

I think if you take a balanced approach to training, you'll avoid the Johnny Bravo Syndrome. That happens to guys when they spend sooo much time on their upper bodies, the show-off muscles, and neglect their lower bodies. Hell, if you wear long pants all the time, who cares!? :rolleyes:

CROWLER
02-17-2003, 01:46 PM
I have never heard of a chart like that but it has me thinking. I also enjoy mathmatics so it interests me.

Funny story when I was about 13 I looked at the measurements of the pro bodybuilders, guys like Zane, Arnold etc.

You could actually figure out what a guys chest size would be if you knew his arm size.

Guess it is along the lines of how it is possible to figure out the face dimensions of 'beautiful' people Things like distance between a person's eyes compared to the size of their mouth etc.

back2it
02-17-2003, 01:57 PM
I have not seen a strength chart but size charts exist . It that is what you want let me know I will post one .

sto0le
02-17-2003, 03:22 PM
Originally posted by back2it
I have not seen a strength chart but size charts exist . It that is what you want let me know I will post one .

size charts exsist you say?, well go ahead and show me one, id like to see if its what im thinking of :)

back2it
02-17-2003, 04:45 PM
this is a formula designed by a person named John McCollum
It is based on wrist measurement .
Chest 6.5 X's wrist
waist 70 % of chest
thigh 53%
neck 37%
upper arm 36%
calve 34%
forearm 29%
another guy David Willoughby had something called "optimum ideal standard" it was printed in the Nov 1979 issue of Ironman . It is much more detailed .

sto0le
02-17-2003, 06:13 PM
Originally posted by back2it
this is a formula designed by a person named John McCollum
It is based on wrist measurement .
Chest 6.5 X's wrist
waist 70 % of chest
thigh 53%
neck 37%
upper arm 36%
calve 34%
forearm 29%
another guy David Willoughby had something called "optimum ideal standard" it was printed in the Nov 1979 issue of Ironman . It is much more detailed .

hmm i like it, but its hard to go by, as 'upper arm' is pretty general..too bad i wasnt around in 1979 or id have a look through the more detailed one :)

thanks though :)

Belle
02-17-2003, 06:53 PM
I think that is a very observant question to ask really. I had similar questions when I first began weight training several months ago. Mainly then it was asking abour quads and hamstrings and asking my Personal Trainer did it matter that I cannot do as heavy a weight on my hamstrings as what I can do when I exercise quads?

It is also not a silly question when it is really important to have a nice balance or symetry between the upper body and the lower body either. In fact that is the best reason I can think of for not over working one particular muscle group over the rest actually. Like other's have said, it comes down to common sense and
making sure you cover all areas in your weight training. After all, you would not want to be as my husband so eloquently put's it a "lucky leg's" and top heavy BB! Lucky leg's because you would become sooo top heavy...well on such scrawny leg's you would be "lucky" they did not snap and go up your bottom. ;)

LOL!!!!!

On that amusing thought...I'm away to cook some dinner. :)

bob_alfisti
02-17-2003, 09:22 PM
Originally posted by back2it
this is a formula designed by a person named John McCollum
It is based on wrist measurement .
Chest 6.5 X's wrist
waist 70 % of chest
thigh 53%
neck 37%
upper arm 36%
calve 34%
forearm 29%
another guy David Willoughby had something called "optimum ideal standard" it was printed in the Nov 1979 issue of Ironman . It is much more detailed .
this measurement is generally a guide for a well-balanced body or symmetry. it can guide you so that you would know which body part is lagging.
but the bb chart that "stoole" was asking offer a different purpose. would be real cool if it exists...

back2it
02-18-2003, 06:25 PM
Originally posted by bob_alfisti
this measurement is generally a guide for a well-balanced body or symmetry. it can guide you so that you would know which body part is lagging.
but the bb chart that "stoole" was asking offer a different purpose. would be real cool if it exists...


If it is a strength chart you want try the powerlifting chat . They are much more concerned with allout strength than most BB's . They may know of something

Absinthe
02-18-2003, 06:44 PM
The original Weider bodybuilding system gives suggestions for starting weights for each exercise. Maybe you could use this as a guideline to calculate the various percentages???

If you're interested I will post the info.

sto0le
02-18-2003, 08:05 PM
Originally posted by Absinthe
The original Weider bodybuilding system gives suggestions for starting weights for each exercise. Maybe you could use this as a guideline to calculate the various percentages???

If you're interested I will post the info.


sure post all the info you can! anything can help :)


the most recent book ive read is actualy called 'the edge: the weider edge' it is a pretty thick book talking about the weider brothers and things they have done, and how theyve helped various bodybuilders over the years...they talk about everything from nutrients to excersizes..narcotics, workout plans..meal plans...im liking it :) but i saw no such 'bb chart' as i was referring to in my first post in this thread...post yours and then we'll see! thanks.

Absinthe
02-19-2003, 03:46 PM
Sorry it took so long, but work got in the way. ;)

The following is from "Joe Weider's Bodybuilding System" (1988)
Recommended starting poundage as percentage of bodyweight:

Bench Press 35%
Flyes 10%
Lateral Raises 3%
Presses Behind Neck/Military Press 20%
Squats 35%
Leg Extensions 15%
Leg Curls 5%
Bent Rows 25%
Barbell Curls 20%
Triceps Extension 20%
Incline Curls 10%
Calf Raises 35%
Power Cleans 20%
One-arm Rows 10%
Pullovers 10%
Upright Rows 10%
Bent Laterals 5%
Concentration Curls 5%
Kickbacks 5%
Wrist Curls 20%
Lunges 15%
Deadlifts 50%
Incline Press 25%
Close-grip Press 20%

Hope that helps!

tracyb555
02-20-2003, 02:08 PM
SInce I'm somewhat of a numbers geek, I found both the body symetry charts & weightlifting charts interesting.

Does anyone know if there is a similar symmetry chart for women? I'm sure that different ratios probably apply.

back2it
02-20-2003, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by tracyb555
SInce I'm somewhat of a numbers geek, I found both the body symetry charts & weightlifting charts interesting.

Does anyone know if there is a similar symmetry chart for women? I'm sure that different ratios probably apply.


I haven't seen one for women and yes there would be a difference .

TwoWalks
02-20-2003, 05:59 PM
Well here is one of those cool calculators. It is based on the formula that the Greeks used to create the statues and was the main guidline of the perfect body through the days of Sandow.

Enjoy:

http://www.sandowmuseum.com/ideal.html

I am currently working on being a Greek God for I shall never be a Mr Olympia.

Belle
02-20-2003, 06:12 PM
Kind of Venus like? They had rounded fatty tummies back then and heavy thighs too...

Cool, I like this calculator and I am a woman! It get's me as having a 39 inch chest with just a wrist measurement of 6" even!

The waist should be 27" and my thigh should be 20.67 and my calves should be only 13.26... my hips would be bigger being a woman than the men's recommended size going by a size 6" in wrist = 33.15 and the bicep may be a little big at 14" but I like the chest size already!!!!! LOL!!!