PDA

View Full Version : How much weight???



Rubberducked
02-10-2003, 10:16 AM
Hope somebody can help me here....

Just starting out but I've not been able to find much on how much weight you should really be using as a beginner just starting out....

I'm not looking for any numbers but would like to get an idea of how you know if enough is a) too little or b) too much...?

Is it something along the lines of "x" amount of repetitions in any particular excercise before I can push no more??? or I should find what weight I can push 10 times and only carry out 6 doing that several times per session???

Ooops - I'm also only 32 - does that mean you old buggers may not answer my questions :)

Many thanks,
Scotty....

Rolandb1963
02-10-2003, 10:33 AM
Hey Rubber,

You should be using a weight you can lift 10 to 12 times for 3 to 5 sets. This is a safe place to start, once you find out what is a safe weight, you can move up in weight until exhaustion in 5 to 8 reps. if you are looking to build muscle, or stick to the weight you can handle for 10 to 12 reps. for toning and endurance. That choice is yours, just do it safely.

Rolandb1963

TwoWalks
02-10-2003, 12:07 PM
X = amount of weight that you can handle for the number of reps without straining or losing form.

In the beginning the weight has less to do with it than good form and focus on the muscle being worked.

Only 32 ... huuuuum not sure, but we might answer you, being old it just might take us longer and answer will take longer because we are slower :D

Phatman1179
02-10-2003, 03:05 PM
As Roland said a good rule of thumb if your just starting out, If you can do 3 sets of twelve add 5 pounds next time, If you can't get 8 reps lighten the load next time. You'll know it's a good weight if your sets look something like 12, 10, 8

snakeman
02-10-2003, 03:05 PM
very well said bro's.
remember saftey is the key word.
use a weight that you can handle in the rep range you are doing.
form and control is key tp proper lifting. the weight will come in time, dont get imbarressed with low weight.
good lifting.

back2it
02-10-2003, 06:00 PM
I agree with what everyone said but would like to emphasize about the form . It is very important to at first learn proper form it is far more important than the amount of weight at this point . Once you know what good form is it will be easier to tell if the weight is too much because you will know how it should feel . Because you cannot see yourself lift a knowledgable training partner is a big help now and forever . A simple thing like moving your elbows away from your body when doing a curl is easy to miss and reduces the benefit of the exercise to a large degree .

Charger
02-10-2003, 06:16 PM
Originally posted by Rubberducked
Ooops - I'm also only 32 - does that mean you old buggers may not answer my questions :)

Many thanks,
Scotty....

Just got up from my second nap and stuck the teeth in, now what was your question, my memory is not good these days:D

How many days are you lifting? The advice about a partner is absolutley right. Beginning can be a bit hard without one, not that it can't be done but having someone spotting you also helps.Plus you have someone to push you to get to the gym. Good Luck, hope you are still lifting when you are as old as us OLD BUGGERS.

tracyb555
02-10-2003, 06:21 PM
Charger - can you see if my hearing aid is in correctly. Just thought I heard someone asking for advice, yet calling us old buggers :)

Great advice above. Nothing to add except a warm welcome. Now where is that Geritol?

back2it
02-10-2003, 06:37 PM
I need some help designing a new program that I can do from my wheelchair .

Gollum
02-10-2003, 06:45 PM
Originally posted by Rubberducked

Ooops - I'm also only 32 - does that mean you old buggers may not answer my questions :)



Don't worry.I'm 32 also.I snuck in under the velvet ropes.Told them I just looked young for my age and mentioned an episode of Matlock.These old buggers will believe anything.

:D

Anomeley
02-10-2003, 06:47 PM
I see a great deal of advice on high rep sets and a little on form. Get good form first with whatever weight you can handle easily. Once your form is good then 10-12 rep sets IMHO are for warm up sets only. NOT FOR 3-4 "lift" sets. Depending on how you decide to warm up I would do 1-2 warm up sets of 10 to get the blood moving. Having said that, DO NOT count them as part of your "lift sets". When you do your first "lift set" (and I will do 4 of lets say flat bench, then 3 incline and 3 decline) I do 4-6 reps per. If you are doing 6 reps with ease you need to be moving up in weight likewise if you can barely push the fourth rep then you are probably a bit heavy.

Yeah, this makes you lift heavy on all lifts but it will give consistently good gains as long as you are not over training. Once a week with say 9-12 "lift sets" per body part i.e: chest, legs, back, arms & shoulders are adequate with a minute or two of rest between sets. I get through my workouts in less than an hour M-F and rest on the weekend. Hope this helps.

Rubberducked
02-11-2003, 07:26 AM
Thanks for all your great advice everybody... all plain talk so easy to understand for me :)

Was reading a few posts last night and people were mentioning "Skullcrushers" and other such excercises which all sound like good fun but mean absolutely nothing to me...

I'm working overseas and don't know anybody out here who takes any form of fitness training seriously.... and as such I've put on a few pounds over the last few years. Recently got up off my flabby arse and started playing tennis once a week with the work and aim to burn off a few more spare kilos in the gym in the apartment hopefully on a regular thrice weekly approach.

It has bikes, steppers, a treadmill and a big all in one machine thing with about 3 seats around the outside and a whole host of bars, pulleys, straps and cables... hopefully this will help me with my form as doing a bench press appears to be as easy as putting the seat and bars in the correct position and just pushing until your red in the face.

I'm off to a good start now anyway now I know what weight range to be aiming for..... again, many thanks indeed!

Orra best,
Scotty....

Phatman1179
02-11-2003, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by Anomeley
I see a great deal of advice on high rep sets and a little on form. Get good form first with whatever weight you can handle easily. Once your form is good then 10-12 rep sets IMHO are for warm up sets only. NOT FOR 3-4 "lift" sets. Depending on how you decide to warm up I would do 1-2 warm up sets of 10 to get the blood moving. Having said that, DO NOT count them as part of your "lift sets". When you do your first "lift set" (and I will do 4 of lets say flat bench, then 3 incline and 3 decline) I do 4-6 reps per. If you are doing 6 reps with ease you need to be moving up in weight likewise if you can barely push the fourth rep then you are probably a bit heavy.

Yeah, this makes you lift heavy on all lifts but it will give consistently good gains as long as you are not over training. Once a week with say 9-12 "lift sets" per body part i.e: chest, legs, back, arms & shoulders are adequate with a minute or two of rest between sets. I get through my workouts in less than an hour M-F and rest on the weekend. Hope this helps.

I would have to disagree with you. High rep sets do have their place in training. (Hypertrophy) It would depend more upon a persons goals as to the type of training they want to perform. All that being said I really believe you should cycle your training every 4-6 weeks between strength workouts and endurance workouts.(slow twitch and fast twitch fibers) I would even cycle in some Power lifting to get really dense.

I do completely agree with you about learning the proper form. A beginning lifter should keep the weights light to build form and muscle memory.

Anomeley
02-11-2003, 09:20 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Phatman1179
[B]I would have to disagree with you. High rep sets do have their place in training.


I totally agree, I was responding primarily to: I'm not looking for any numbers but would like to get an idea of how you know if enough is a) too little or b) too much...?


As a personal preference, I lift heavy. I train for strength and power not physique...thats a bi-product of lifting the way I do. Hi-rep sets have their place for sure, I just don't have a lot of use for them like a BB would.

Phatman1179
02-12-2003, 02:20 PM
Originally posted by Anomeley
I totally agree, I was responding primarily to: I'm not looking for any numbers but would like to get an idea of how you know if enough is a) too little or b) too much...?


As a personal preference, I lift heavy. I train for strength and power not physique...thats a bi-product of lifting the way I do. Hi-rep sets have their place for sure, I just don't have a lot of use for them like a BB would.

I hear ya Bro. I was a powerlifter for 18 years but I gained so much weight from a bad diet that I hated my look. So I gave up Powerlifting (For now) until I get my bf down to a single digit. Then I may consider picking up the Big iron again, but continue to watch what I eat. I like the Dense, rugged look of a low bf powerlifter.