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View Full Version : for endurance trainers EAT AS MUCH CARBS AS U WANT



wimp2pimp
11-19-2006, 03:45 PM
The more carbs you eat, the more completely your muscles and livers will store your energy (up to a point). So I guess you don't eat AS MUCH AS YOU WANT, but you eat up to that sweet spot, and this only works for carbs by the way. So a high fat diet NOR a mixed diet between fat and carbs will not be as effective as carbs :)

discuss.

SDC77
11-19-2006, 03:51 PM
If you're a Navy SEAL, I agree. True endurance athletes/Special Ops people are a tiny % of the population, let alone lurkers here. A 70% + carb diet is crazy unless you fit into the category I mentioned. I think people who do a lot of cardio tend to classify themselves as endurance athletes, but in comparison to the intensity to real endurance athletes, they tend to be nothing close.

StandTall
11-19-2006, 03:53 PM
The more carbs you eat the more weight you potentialy maintain and the more weight you must carrey when you run. I am moving from a 6 day a week gym programme to a 6 to 7 day a week running programme with only 3 gym sessions per week. I have found increasing my carb intake has contributed to me maining my weight which isnt ideal as when running up hills to much weight event if its lean body mass just means their is more to carry.

wimp2pimp
11-19-2006, 04:12 PM
The more carbs you eat the more weight you potentialy maintain and the more weight you must carrey when you run. I am moving from a 6 day a week gym programme to a 6 to 7 day a week running programme with only 3 gym sessions per week. I have found increasing my carb intake has contributed to me maining my weight which isnt ideal as when running up hills to much weight event if its lean body mass just means their is more to carry.

what about this scenario. You eat 2500 calories, 20% healthy fat, 50% carbs, 30% protein. Now try 5% fat, 80% carbs, 15% protein. according to a study i read, people who did this for several days prior to the training, whether it be a basketball game or a pickup baseball game, or just jogging or what not, I'm assuming they are talking about people who are above average shape, lasted almost 1 hour longer than those with high fat intake, and about half an hour longer than those with a more equal mixed diet. It's hard to back this up beacuse I have no link or reference to this study. And the scenario i wrote included protein factor, whereas the study only compared between high fat diet vs high carb diet, vs mixed diet (im assuming protein played an equal factor in all 3 diets).

PennState
11-19-2006, 05:50 PM
It has also been proven that people who injest cocaine into their bloodstream before physical activity have better performance. But that doesn't mean it is healthy. 5% fat is just TOO little in my opinion. You won't be able to maintain normal body function for too long.

StandTall
11-19-2006, 08:43 PM
The problem with that diet as said above is the level of fat. Fat is important for overall health of course but specific to running is joint function. Fats aid in lubrication and joint mobility. I am not saying that endurance runners should have a high carb diet. The title of the post suggest you were saying endurance runners can eat as many carbs as they want although i take it from your last post which included a 2,500 calorie diet you didnt quiet mean that. I could eat 10, 000 of carbs a day and that would definitly not aid in my running.

matthor
11-19-2006, 08:49 PM
what about this scenario. You eat 2500 calories, 20% healthy fat, 50% carbs, 30% protein. Now try 5% fat, 80% carbs, 15% protein. according to a study i read, people who did this for several days prior to the training, whether it be a basketball game or a pickup baseball game, or just jogging or what not, I'm assuming they are talking about people who are above average shape, lasted almost 1 hour longer than those with high fat intake, and about half an hour longer than those with a more equal mixed diet. It's hard to back this up beacuse I have no link or reference to this study. And the scenario i wrote included protein factor, whereas the study only compared between high fat diet vs high carb diet, vs mixed diet (im assuming protein played an equal factor in all 3 diets).

what u have described seems liek a pre-comp carb load. i doubt the athletes followed this plan for the months of training leading up to the event.

a few days of carb loading prior to an endurance race is good practice imo but it isnt an advisable day in day out diet

ironman1964bc
11-19-2006, 09:53 PM
The problem is muscles and the liver really don't store that many carbs, so the amount needed is usually overblown. Besides that, when the glycogen is used up, you either hit the wall or your muscle is next in line to be used for energy, not fat because a carb eater's metabolism is inefficient at burning fat for fuel. I biked 5,000 miles in 4 months 10 years ago and I lost 60lbs despite continuing to lift. I also lost 250lbs on my squat and 150lbs on my bench and I was softer because of the lack of muscle. Thank god I learned my lesson and sold my bike that fall and have only done sprints since.

Actually, if a person is fat adapted, they will have more endurance. Unfortunately, most tests are done on carb eaters who are not fat adapted, so carbs will always win out in that case. The fastest marathon time in olympic history was performed by a Masai runner who ate no carbs.

I still say that if you are naturally lean, then carbs are fine, but if you gain weight easily, you would better off without them or you will never be lean and muscular.

matthor
11-19-2006, 11:10 PM
^^ wow interesting. i might search around for some mor einfo on this