PDA

View Full Version : Worried about my father



bachovas
02-01-2003, 07:21 PM
OK here's the deal, my dad's 49 years old, he's overweight and he won't do crap about his health. What can I do for him, he doesn't smoke or drink, and I'm trying to get him to workout.
I heard that men over 40 should take 100mg of aspirin to lower risks of heart attack and such. What other things should I get him? Maybe some vitamins, a multi?

Eye2_Man
02-01-2003, 07:51 PM
Walking is good.

TrishB
02-01-2003, 08:34 PM
Pills are not going to take that extra weight off.
Maybe sign up to do some activities with him....join something together. Such as taking a martial arts class or boxing. If you are doing it with him, maybe he would be more apt to go.

MiloMan
02-01-2003, 09:50 PM
You will probably get some ideas here:

http://www.worldfitness.org/program.html

IPR
02-02-2003, 12:40 AM
Hey bach,

Other than overweight how is his health generally? And how overweight is he?

The first thing is for him to become interested in his own health. He doesn't need to start popping pills or going to the gym really, but just want to improve things. You telling him he must do something probably won't make him change. he must choose to.

Then its a process of small steps. Improving his diet in small ways at first and exercising, walking is the best thing for most people.

How has your father reacted to you doing Keto? This is a great diet for sedentary people (not CKD) and would improve his health alot IMO, and its a diet where most folks don't even feel hungry at all.

Good luck

hixy
02-02-2003, 06:18 AM
Originally posted by bachovas
OK here's the deal, my dad's 49 years old, he's overweight and he won't do crap about his health. What can I do for him, he doesn't smoke or drink, and I'm trying to get him to workout.
I heard that men over 40 should take 100mg of aspirin to lower risks of heart attack and such. What other things should I get him? Maybe some vitamins, a multi?

hello,
if your dad doesnt want to work out thats cool,you cant force him, just love him for being your dad. my dad died when he was 39 in 1988 and i still miss him now

back2it
02-02-2003, 08:37 AM
I bought my Mom and Dad some fixed weight dumbells for Christmas {among other gifts} Dad is pretty active with walking and gardening but not in winter Mom doesn't do much physical . She laughed and said take these things home with you I will never use them . I left them there anyway and believe it or not she is on a 3 day a week program Dad is using them a bit as well . I think She felt guilty about me spending the money and her not being interested . Her Doc is in full approval with the exercise . This is the kicker She is 75 Dad 78 . I had talked of the virtues of resistance training to them for a while now even when I wasn't exercising so it is not new information to them .
Maybe if you spend a bit of time explaining why He should do it and maybe even buy Him something that He knows you spent the money and effort to help Him do it . He might look at it differently . I'm 47 only a couple of years younger than your Dad , maybe let Him search the net about what exercise can do as far as delaying degenerative disease and ailments . But it all comes down to what someone already said He has to want to do it . All you can do is light the spark of interest the rest is up to Him .

Phatman1179
02-02-2003, 08:46 AM
I was also worried about my folks; this article may help; (http://www.testosterone.net/nation_articles/238par.jsp) I gave it to my Dad and we had a great talk about training and life style choices. I also got him 30 day free pass at my gym. He has been at it now for about 6 weeks, lost 12 pounds and is moving into more advanced lifting techniques. But I got to say it was his own decision, I just gave him the facts and support (Helped him with his training and form). He just turned 69 in Dec and he is really bitten by the training Bug.

Good luck to ya!!!

Minotaur
02-02-2003, 09:41 AM
I think it's great that so many older people, who probably grew up thinking that weightlifting and fitness were for 'healthnuts', are getting into shape. Especially to hear that someone loses x number of lbs and has been working out for x number of weeks and is sticking with it.

All you can do is encourage the spark of interest the person may have. My parents used to say "you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink".

I have a friend whom I love very much as a big brother. I'm 45 and he's 52 this month. He golfs occasionally, but that's about it. He did quit smoking, but his diet is crap. And he knows his gut is getting bigger. He wore a sweater to work one day because he said it covered the fact that his waistband was so tight and his gut protruding so much it looked ridiculous.

What can you do? :confused: Love them as they are and hope and pray for the best health for them, in spite of themselves.

tracyb555
02-02-2003, 11:08 AM
It's difficult when we see people we love not taking care of themselves. Ultimately, they have to make the decision themselves that they want to change their lifestyles.

When I first started getting back in shape, I was probably guilty of being too passionate about the virtues of clean eating/exercise etc. While I had good intentions of sharing what was really doing wonders for me, I'm sure I was a little overzealous and turned people off who were thinking that it all seemed overwhelming.

I later decided to just quietly keep plugging along. When people saw that I was losing weight, had more energy, and was looking fitter, they started to ask what I was doing. Instead of launching into my previous (overzeaous) speeches, I'd have a short & sweet answer about eating healthier and regular exercise. If they were really interested, they would probe further and I was more than happy to offer advice about what I'd been doing.

This approach (leading by quiet example) turned out to be the most influential of all. My family slowly started adopting healthier eating patterns and started exercising a bit more. They weren't quite as fanatical about it as I was, but they were making slow and gradual improvements. I've also helped influencing some overweight friends who are now starting to get in shape.

Sorry for the long response, it's just that this topic is near & dear to my heart.

TwoWalks
02-02-2003, 11:44 AM
Originally posted by bachovas
OK here's the deal, my dad's 49 years old, he's overweight and he won't do crap about his health. What can I do for him,

100mg of aspirin to lower risks of heart attack and such. What other things should I get him? Maybe some vitamins, a multi?

First - the 100mg for heart health is actually 81mg and anything above that was found to have no benifit. I have been on this for a year now, ever since my heart attack.

You do not say if you live with your Dad, but if you do, set up a light workout area at home and see if he gets interested. Don't push or he will pull.

Activities together can sneak exercise up on him. Swimming - bowling - tennis - golf - bike riding etc. Use your imagination and his interests to slowly move him toward activity. Maybe in years past he did something that was physically active, show an interest in that and ask him to help you learn about it and how to do it. Most people can not resist passing on knowledge.

bachovas
02-02-2003, 04:55 PM
Well actually my parents think I'm crazy, you're doing to much and stuff like that, I try to help them as much as I can with little things like don't eat that or eat that instead you simple things, sometimes when my dad is eating something he says like "oh, 40 calories with 80 grs of xxxxxxx", just messing around. Don't know what to do, it's difficult for him to exercise either for physical conditions or time or place to do it. About keto, I don't think so, my family diet is pretty much carbs, just bread, rice, more bread, so it would be to hard for him.

TwoWalks
02-03-2003, 10:21 AM
Originally posted by bachovas
Well actually my parents think I'm crazy

I don't think so, my family diet is pretty much carbs, just bread, rice, more bread, so it would be to hard for him.

Some times the best thing we can do for people is too accept them for what and who they are. Change the things we can change and accept what we cannot change. You will never be able to change your Dad, your Dad has too want to change. You view your Dad's eating and exercise as poor, he views it as just fine.

People survive just fine the way your Dad is, so if something does come up where he wants a change then you will have gained the knowledge to help when it is requested. The more you push, the more your Dad will resist.

MagicMel
02-03-2003, 10:25 AM
Fine words of wisdom, Two Walks. Very well said. :)

back2it
02-03-2003, 05:48 PM
Don't push too hard but don't give up either . I have been working on getting My Parents to exercise for a long time . If you read my post above you will see that it finally worked . Lots of patience and time is what it took for them to understand , just like when they taught things to Me . I thank God they just didn't let me do my own thing all the time . They provided guidance that I sometimes rejected but they never gave up or pushed too hard . Eventually I saw the light and now so have they .

arkangel
02-10-2003, 10:32 PM
My dad died at 61, of a MI.
He worked hard, all of his life driving a truck and working for a beer distributor. He basically retired and QUIT doing everything.
He was awfully hard headed as well. Had he slacked off on the booze and walked a bit more, then he might have evened his chances out better... who the hell knows. I wish he was here now.
What does you father like to do? You don't have to strip down to shorts and a tank top... and hit the weight stacks to stay away from a possible MI.
I've started taking YOGA, which is great for all of your body and it is pretty unintrusive... all you need is a mat, two foam bricks and a strap... and an intro class. Does he like to bowl, get out and hike about outside... cycle on a nice dirt road or park? Get him a dog, so he'll have to walk the thing... the bigger the better, so it will PULL him down the street!!! How about bocce ball... you get out there and pitch a ball down the shoot.
There are hundreds of other things to do without trying to turn your father into the super-jock, he can't see himself as...
TRAVEN8@HOTMAIL.COM

Arkangel
Oakland/CA