PDA

View Full Version : Soybean Oil: Good or bad?



Uone
01-12-2003, 11:49 AM
I eat a canned sardines that are packed in soybean oil and found that soybean oil has a pretty good nutritional profile. Here is the link:

http://www.preparedfoods.com/archives/1999/9911/9911soy.htm


Soybean oil is a rich source of phytochemicals including phospholipids, tocopherols and phytosterols. Phospholipids are present in soybean lecithin, which is recovered from crude soybean oil during initial steps of oil processing. Tocopherols and phytosterols are recovered during deodorization, which is the final step in oil processing. Collectively, these soy phytochemicals are valuable in terms of human health and nutrition.
Phospholipids - Key components of lecithin are phosphatidylcholine and choline. Choline is essential to normal liver function, cardiovascular health, neural function and reproduction and development. Choline and phosphatidylcholine have been shown to improve heart health by reducing blood levels of cholesterol and homocysteine, an amino acid found to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Some evidence also indicates that lecithin and choline improve learning and memory as well as physical performance during activities of long duration.

The Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences has officially recognized choline as an essential nutrient and has established a recommended daily choline intake of 550 mg for adult men, 425 mg for adult women and lesser amounts for children. With the need for increased choline supplementation in pregnant women and infants, the board recommends women taking 450 mg daily during pregnancy and 550 mg daily during lactation.

Vitamin E - Soybean oil is the primary commercial source of alpha tocopherol, also known as vitamin E. Vitamin E is the body’s primary lipid-soluble antioxidant defense against free radical induced cell damage, which has been linked to a number of cancers, heart disease, cataracts, premature aging and arthritis. Research also suggests that vitamin E enhances the immune system, helps relieve symptoms of PMS, slows the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and provides protection against UV radiation, air pollutants and other environmental toxins.

Phytosterols - Soybean oil contains a number of phytosterols including ß-sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol. In particular, ß-sitosterol and its hydrogenated and esterified derivatives, known as sitostanol esters, have been shown to reduce serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol by up to 10% without decreasing levels of the beneficial HDL cholesterol. A number of margarines, spreads and salad dressing products containing ß-sitosterol or sitostanol esters are being marketed as cholesterol-lowering products. One serving of Lipton’s Take Control™ salad dressing contains 1,120 milligrams of natural soybean extract.

Timbo
01-12-2003, 12:36 PM
Soybean oil (not hydrogenated) has an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of 7.5:1. This isn't terrible--not nearly as bad as many of the other oils and the average American's consumption on a whole--but I wouldn't recommend that this be a substitute for flax or fish oils, which it sounds like it would not be.

IPR
01-12-2003, 03:55 PM
soybean oil initself isn't a bad oil, BUT, it is one of the food processors favorite oils for partially hydrogenating, which makes it a BAD oil. Veg and corn oil are also very widely used for this purpose as well.

If possible I avoid soybean oil for this reason.

If you eat mayo, the way to know if it hasn't used partially hydrogenated oil is to see if 1. It must be refrigerated after opening, and 2. If you have a limited period within which to eat it, say 4 weeks. Hydrogenated oils last a long time, natural unaltered oils high in polyunsatrurated fats don't. 3. If it uses soybean oil 99% chance its hydrogenated.

For mayo, look for those made with canola oil as generally not hydrogenated.

BALZAK
08-30-2008, 08:44 PM
soybean oil initself isn't a bad oil, BUT, it is one of the food processors favorite oils for partially hydrogenating, which makes it a BAD oil. Veg and corn oil are also very widely used for this purpose as well.

If possible I avoid soybean oil for this reason.

If you eat mayo, the way to know if it hasn't used partially hydrogenated oil is to see if 1. It must be refrigerated after opening, and 2. If you have a limited period within which to eat it, say 4 weeks. Hydrogenated oils last a long time, natural unaltered oils high in polyunsatrurated fats don't. 3. If it uses soybean oil 99% chance its hydrogenated.

For mayo, look for those made with canola oil as generally not hydrogenated.
On the ingredients list, doesn't it have to specify if the oils are hydrogenated? I mean, if the label just lists "soybean oil", then it shouldn't be hydrogenated right?

JayPok
08-30-2008, 10:21 PM
On the ingredients list, doesn't it have to specify if the oils are hydrogenated? I mean, if the label just lists "soybean oil", then it shouldn't be hydrogenated right?

If it's not listed as "hydrogenated soybean oil", it shouldn't be. Either way, I don't eat soy.