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tryingtolose
08-09-2006, 11:27 AM
I'm just getting ready to start lifting. I've been spending the past six months or so trying to get my weights so that I could start lifting. I'm interested in losing weight and fat while firming up my body overall. I've always wanted to have a flat defined abs. In the past year I have been able to lose about 30-40 lbs, but have gained some of this back during the summer due to vacation and other unforunate events. I've always had a problem with man boobs and weight. Any advise or help would surely be appreicated. I eat mostly low fat but have a tendecy to like sweets and meat. I've really not been exercising or lifting weights.

pastorgbc
08-09-2006, 11:32 AM
What type of weights and equipment have you been able to get?

Ray

tryingtolose
08-09-2006, 11:43 AM
Free weights (from Sears - Weider) and a machine (like you by at Walmart). My free weights consist of 4 - 45 lb, 6 - 22 lb, 6 - 5.5 lb, 6 - 2.5 lb, 2 - 40 lb bars and 1 - curl bar (?), leg attachment, and bench. My machine is also a Weider and is three sided. That's about all I can tell you right now.

jtroster
08-09-2006, 11:47 AM
I suggest you join a gym that has good personal trainers. When you are starting out it is important that your exercise form is good so that you don't hurt yourself. A lot of gyms provide an initial training session as part of joining.

45BIG
08-09-2006, 11:57 AM
One thing to remember, not sure if know how critical this is, but abs are a lot more about diet than they are about exercises. I am not saying that exercising them isn't important but I have seen some awesome abs on folks who really have their diets in tune and do little ab work.

Starting out I would keep it simple and mostly compound movements: bench press, squats, military press, deadlifts, and rowing exercises. Sometimes people make the mistake of doing too much too soon and burn themselves out. Keep your workouts to under an hour and be deliberate in your choices of exercises, the days of the week you exercise, and chart your progress in those exercises.

Set reasonable goals for yourself in a set period of time. Say in 8 weeks I would like to weigh this much, have these measurements with these body parts, and lift this much. Of course taking a picture later on to compare to your current pic is a good thing also. Once you reach your first set of goals reward yourself with something you have been depriving yourself of and take a few days off.

Pick some good supplements multi vitamins and a solid protien powder to begin with and add creatine at a later date.

lukamar
08-09-2006, 11:58 AM
I'll agree with jtroster even if you only join for a few months you will learn the proper way to lift and that may be worth the cost in lowering your accident and injury risk.

I'd also add you should have a checkup and blood-work prior to starting an exercise regime so you know you are OK to go.

jtroster
08-09-2006, 12:16 PM
One more thing. Read the start of the "Are you new here?" thread. Its got lots of good information.

pastorgbc
08-09-2006, 12:18 PM
Although it might be a good thing for you to see a personal trainer, I do not think that is necessary. I do think you need to get a physical check up. I also do think it is better to work out in a gym than it is at home, but you have already gotten the equipment.

There is plenty of information on this site to get an idea of how to perform the exercises. You can also get any of several books to show you how to do exercises.

Usually a machine like you have has an instruction form on what exercises you can perform. I would follow those instructions and build your workout around that machine first. You can incorporate the free weight exercises as you make progress.

Be patient, go slow, and set goals for yourself. If you have more specific questions, ask away.

Ray

Stenn
08-09-2006, 12:29 PM
I suggest you join a gym that has good personal trainers. When you are starting out it is important that your exercise form is good so that you don't hurt yourself. A lot of gyms provide an initial training session as part of joining.

I agree with this plan and it's what I did for myself. When I started weight training, I had never done anything like it before so my primary concern was not injuring myself. I joined 24-Hour Fitness and my membership included three introductory sessions with a personal trainer. The trainer had me set goals for myself, measured my current body state, gave me a meal plan recommendation, and showed me how all the fancy equipment worked.

Another important thing that my trainer did for me was to have me work out at an intensity that actually got results. Had I just wandered into the gym by myself and started lifting, my natural lazy tendacies would have taken over and I would have ended up having comfortable and ineffectual work-outs.

If you choose to go the gym/trainer route, your home gym purchases need not have been in vain. Just have your trainer teach you how to use the stuff you've purchased already and use it when you can't get to the gym.

Good luck!
Steve

30-A rider
08-09-2006, 12:41 PM
I suggest you join a gym that has good personal trainers. When you are starting out it is important that your exercise form is good so that you don't hurt yourself. A lot of gyms provide an initial training session as part of joining.


I respectfully disagree with the above post. I do think joining a gym is the way to go as you can learn lots from watching others and a gyms atmosphere is motivational. The part I disagree with is looking to a trainer....while yes it is important to learn correctly, IMO most trainers know very little; some do but most dont. My suggestion when going to the gym is to not talk to trainers as 99% of the time they dont want to offer help unless they get their $$$$ from you, and again they dont know much from my experience. My best suggestion is when in the gym find the individual that looks good to you; the physique you aspire to have. Preferably someone who isnt much younger but can be older. Watch this individual..respectfully introduce yourself when they are not in the middle of a work out but rather at the end or before they start. Ask some questions. After you have learned all you feel you can from them pick another individual. Also realize thier is a wealth of information on here from people with very accomplished physiques. My guess is you want a lean muscular look..most trainers dont have this....youve heard the saying those that cant teach?...there you go. Good luck and welcome.

Stenn
08-09-2006, 01:55 PM
Yup, it's true. Some trainers don't know much. I guess I got lucky with mine. He was formerly in the military and was competing in bicycle races and a triathalon during the time we were working together. He also had some kinda college degree in a training-related field and held some kinda official personal trainer certification. I appologize for being fuzzy on the details, it's been a while. I guess if you do choose to go the trainer route, it wouldn't hurt to interview a couple and take a look at their cradentials, including their body. I would be very wary of a pudgy trainer...

I must admit, the ideal situation would be to have a friend who also works out and who is willing to teach you. If you don't have such a friend, make one! It's a lot cheaper than paying a trainer, that's for sure.

30-A Rider is also correct about tainer appathy toward non-clients. It seems that if you're not paying them the big bucks, your questions and pleas for guidance will be about as welcome as a bad rash. Been there, done that.

Take care,
Steve

thruxton
08-09-2006, 03:08 PM
....I eat mostly low fat but have a tendecy to like sweets and meat. I've really not been exercising or lifting weights.

i think you are ready for a solid core training program. lay out a plan and stick to it for 6 weeks. then reeval.

as for diet, low fat is kind of an 80's idea. "bad fat" is still bad, but you gotta get enough of the essential fat in your diet.

i would consider going hard-core with the sweets: zip, zotta, zero. do it for 6 weeks and see how it goes.

eat all the meat you want but only high quality stuff. i do cheat and get an organically fed cow now and then, but mostly chicken, turkey, eggs, cheese, skim milk with some whey mixed in...

good luck and please report back with your progress.

jmc53
08-09-2006, 03:42 PM
Some trainers don't know much. Steve[/QUOTE]

Yesterday saw two trainers at my gym stroll past a young newbie doing bench press - he was arching his back about 6" off the bench and bouncing the bar off his chest and the trainers didn't give him any tips at all!

tryingtolose
08-09-2006, 06:15 PM
Thanks guys. There isn't a gym anywhere close to me. I'll give the areas in this site you suggested a look. I hope to get started in the next few weeks, hopefully by September 1 if not sooner. I'll keep you posted and try to post some pics after I start.

Thanks
Ken

45BIG
08-09-2006, 08:15 PM
... and the trainers didn't give him any tips at all! you got to pay them for that :)

FOOTBALL FAN
08-09-2006, 08:26 PM
to join a gym would be good help but you can do it without I never went gym and I have made good gains. first things first look for a pre made workout plan there are plenty if you search bb.com so you will be able to find one to suit you. then look at the excersises on the plan and go on the excersise database on bb.com it shows you all the excersises with videos of correct form get someone to go through these with you ie mum, dad, brother and watch the videos then get them to watch you do the lift to see if it is correct.
once you have that next thing is diet read basic nutrition articles and ask people on here for help you should be eating 1-1.5 g of protein per lbs you weigh so meats such as chicken, turkey and steak are good sources of protein.
but importantly dont get frustrated because it can be a bit confusing to start with just read up and ask questions everyone is here to help

Stenn
08-09-2006, 10:10 PM
go on the excersise database on bb.com it shows you all the excersises with videos of correct form get someone to go through these with you ie mum, dad, brother and watch the videos then get them to watch you do the lift to see if it is correct.

Football Fan, you have a wisdom that is beyond your years. (Perhaps that's why you're posting in the >35 forum even though you're only 19.) I like the idea of having an innocent bystander compare your form with the videos here at bb.com. Even an untrained individual should be able to spot any differences.

FOOTBALL FAN
08-10-2006, 10:27 AM
Football Fan, you have a wisdom that is beyond your years. (Perhaps that's why you're posting in the >35 forum even though you're only 19.) I like the idea of having an innocent bystander compare your form with the videos here at bb.com. Even an untrained individual should be able to spot any differences.


thanks mate I didnt notice everyone was over 35 lol I just went on new posts and seen you needed help

Aquilius
08-10-2006, 01:10 PM
@tryingtolose

Concerning Trainers:
My experience so far has been underwhelming, and IMHO you don't need them. What you maybe want to get is a full-size mirror which allows you to check on your form.

Concerning Exercises:
I believe you should try to start out with the compound exercises that your equipment allows (check on one of the many exercise databases in the internet). I didn't, and consider this a mistake.

If you have never lifted before, you may want to do full-body workouts for the first 6-12 weeks, with 3 to 5 sessions per week (that's what I did, and it worked fine for me).

If you are a beginner, it is probably more important to start out at all, and to stick with it through the difficult entry stage, than the actual details of the workout (meaning that almost any program involving compounds and core exercises will do).

Do compounds, go as heavy as you safely can (which will increase very quickly), try to have 2 rest days between leg workouts and 1 rest day between "intermediate" muscle workouts, work out as intensely as you probably can for 45 to 90 minutes, and you won't make many irrecoverable errors.

Also, if you are a beginner, keeping a detailed log may be very helpful (was for me). The constant gains you will see black-on-white will help you to keep your motivation and overcome frustration when on some days some things seem to go backwards instead of forwards.

You can maybe try to do many different exercises, so it doesn't get boring, it remains challenging, and also you can look forward to growth with some, when others stagnate for a short time.

Always, always, always warm up sufficiently!

You may wish to get yourself a pulse monitor, I found it very helpful at the beginning to get a feeling for the "right" amount of exertion.

If you start lifting, you will feel much better even after the first 5-6 weeks, and you'll actually feel great after 3+ months.

Concerning Nutrition:
If you want to optimize the results of your efforts, you should definitely look at your diet. I didn't at the beginning, and this has definitely held me back somewhat.

Regards,
Aquilius

drommon
08-10-2006, 02:51 PM
As mentioned before you should get a physical prior to starting any program. I strongly suggest that you do this as well as have your blood tested for thyroid, testosterone, lipids, and insulin. If you always had a problem with weight and have been overweight for some time, then your hormones may be out of balance. If they are, then you will still see results albiet slowly. I am speaking from experience and I wished I had followed this advice prior to starting a program. You need to know what and how your body may react to a fitness regimen. Once I got my hormones in balance, results started to show. If you can, get a physical and your blood tested.

Drommon

Sampson777
08-11-2006, 05:16 AM
Free weights (from Sears - Weider) and a machine (like you by at Walmart). My free weights consist of 4 - 45 lb, 6 - 22 lb, 6 - 5.5 lb, 6 - 2.5 lb, 2 - 40 lb bars and 1 - curl bar (?), leg attachment, and bench. My machine is also a Weider and is three sided. That's about all I can tell you right now.
Do you have a bench, a rack that wraps around the bench, or a squat rack?

JD1213
08-13-2006, 02:30 AM
First of all congradulations on the weight loss. That should inspire you to accomplish your next goal.

I think everyone pretty much summed it up for you.
Key points I would agree with whole heartedly:
1) Get your Physical exam-- be sure to tell the doctor of your goals and what you intend on doing.

2) Research the nutrition section of this site. and also look at some of the example diets on the transformation threads. all very helpful.

3) Dont forget to Supplement your diet with Vitamins, EFA's and Lots of quality protien. and dont forget your Rolled oats. Your diet will play a key role in your goal of gaining mass and leaning out at the same time.

4) Totally agree with the "join a gym" its worth it. You will not only have a place to go with an abundance of equiptment but also find some very intelligent people who have been in your shoes and can offer you advice.

Good luck and remember to keep a vision in your mind of what your goal to look like is. vision your defined abs while working out, vision your biceps and chest popping out. things like that can give you that extra energy that no supplement can give you.

- JD1213

tryingtolose
08-15-2006, 09:13 PM
I have a bench with leg attachment. The bench back is adjustable (up/down) and the bench press rack built together. My machine has three sides, one side has pull down cable, leg section and press section for arms & chest. One side has area to do squats and the other area is for like working on abs. This machine was free to me and I paid $150 dollars for the bench, weights and weight holders.

What kind of dumb bells do I need?

NASAMarine
08-22-2006, 01:28 PM
Weights are not everything, think form first weight second.