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View Full Version : c-secions vs natural deliveries



deeyala
06-29-2006, 02:11 AM
i thought i'd ask those who already gave birth.. i am not even pregnant, but i though this is a womanly topic i need to make up my mind about.. :D

from what i heard:
natural is a lot of pain and sometimes you can be in labour for a whole day or so.. but then it's extremely 'worth it' when they give you your baby to hold once it's finally out..
then comes c sections- i don't believe human beings were made to be cut and sutured , and there's risk in taking the general anaesthesia, both for you and your baby - but then c sections are quick ,and pain free procedures and you literally wake up to find you've just given birth (and gutted ,too ;))- plus your baby would have already been acquainted with the whole hospital, before you even set eyes on him...
now if you skip general anaesthesia and stick with a lumbar one (at the bottom of your spine), you'll get to see your baby- but it's even more risky than general..

plus you can be cut and sutured "down there" while giving birth anyway :eek:- i'd pick an abdominal cut to a 'one down there' anyday..!

but with c-sections, there's this scar that will stay forever (maybe i'd start professionally belly-dancing, who knows?), and with repeated vaginal deliveries things can go a "little bit lax" - but then they are meant to go "lax" as you age, anyway.

and natural has to be good, since it's "natural" - (my theory)..
i once read that there's increased prevalence of cervical cancer among women who had mutiple natural deliveries, in the very same article, it was stated that that there's also increased incidence among women who never gave birth :D so i think the key word is 'moderate amount of kids" - and i was going to do that anyway...

i am clearly confused in here; so here's a poll

fitnessman
06-29-2006, 06:03 AM
www.lotusbirth.com

The best thing you can do is to educate yourself now. As the father of six, there is many things about birth I wish I knew before the fact.

buttercup963
06-29-2006, 06:23 AM
Having had 2 children by giving birth naturally, I cant comment on which is better, i believe that c-sections are last resort really, as the female body was designed to give birth, that is why we are on this planet?? I think! lol!
Giving birth naturally, is the most amazing things I have ever and will ever experience, the feeling of pushing your little one out into the world, beats anything hands down, a lot of women who have had to have c-sections feel they have missed out on the experience, thats just my opinion anyway, like I said thats what our bodies are designed to do, yes giving birth hurts, but hey you cant expect something that big to come out of something that small without it hurtin a tad! lol! but the after pain of c-section can be alot worse in the sense of it can take up to 6 weeks to re cover fully, and again alot of women feel they miss out on thier babies in that time by not bein able to be as active as mums that are up and about 10 mins after. Interested topic thou.
Tammy

buttercup963
06-29-2006, 06:24 AM
Forgot to mention my first birth i was cut 'down there' and at the time you dont feel it, as you have the babies head pushin down, and the contractions aswell. Cut was the least of my worries! lol!

energi
06-29-2006, 07:38 AM
I don't think we should get to "choose" a c-section because we want one...that's really odd. Our bodies are made to give birth naturally and c-sections are for special circumstances...

It takes a lot longer to heal from a c-section. Repeated sections can lead to thinning of the uterus and a possible rupture. Sure you can tear in a delivery, but perineal massage helps prevent severe tears and severe ones are uncommon. I would go with a natural birth again even though I had a very painful experience.

Simpy
06-29-2006, 07:39 AM
I had a vaginal birth, not natural, though, as I had hoped. My labor did not progress, the doctor's were pushing me to have a c-section. I kept putting them off, though. Finally, they told me that I at least had to have an epidural and get some protosin (?) to move the contractions along. After another 8 hours, I finally got my little bundle of joy.

I'm the only one of my friends who did not have a c-section. I am very grateful for that, too. They all had a difficult time recovering because they were sooooo sore from the incision. They couldn't hold their babies in comfortable positions and they're stuck with a scar for the rest of their lives. Two of my friends have scars that are very ugly and uneven, as well. I, on the other hand, had no problems. I went for a brief walk the next day around the hospital, just to get my blood pumping. The first day back from the hospital, I did a two mile walk. Recovery was a breeze.

I think vaginal is the way to go.

energi
06-29-2006, 07:45 AM
I guess I should clarify - I gave birth vaginally but had an epidural (at 9+ cm dilated)

fitnessman
06-29-2006, 08:00 AM
Keep in mind, doctors make more money off sections. Sometimes it's in their best interest, not the childs.

The US has an high section rate. Many of the child related issues these days (ADD, Asperger, ECT.) are being linked to all the drugs given during birth. Combine that with Cord Clamping (Clamping cords before they are done pulsating is very bad, but the cord blood companies and hospitals are making a ton of cash), leave to much room for problems.

I have a disabled daughter. I should of learned all the facts before this happened to her. Now my wife and I are very involved in Babies rights.

So my point is: Natrual, using a Midwife and a Doola in a hospital setting. This will give you the best of both worlds. Natural, and if anything goes wrong, you have backup.

A Midwife would never let a section occur unless it was the last option.

Seosaid
06-29-2006, 09:17 AM
I'm currently pregnant and I'm hoping for a natural delivery but, as I have no hips at all, I've been told that it might be hard or even impossible for me to do so.

Every women in my familly (still smalls hips but a bit wider than I am) all tried natural delivery but ended up having a c-section.

I'll try the natural way of course, but if mother nature decides it doesn't work well there's not much I'll be able to do :)

fitnessman
06-29-2006, 09:22 AM
I'm currently pregnant and I'm hoping for a natural delivery but, as I have no hips at all, I've been told that it might be hard or even impossible for me to do so.

Every women in my familly (still smalls hips but a bit wider than I am) all tried natural delivery but ended up having a c-section.

I'll try the natural way of course, but if mother nature decides it doesn't work well there's not much I'll be able to do :)


If you have time, please read the link I provided.

ChocoChick
06-29-2006, 09:36 AM
I don't understand why anyone would even consider a c-section unless it was medically necessary beyond a doubt. The idea of scheduling a section for convenience (whether the mother's or the doctor's) is an awful idea, imo. Women's bodies were designed for birth and, most of the time, do so just fine.

Seosaid - I was also told that I would never give birth vaginally because I am very narrow through the hips (well, less so now after 3 babies ;)) but I ended up with 3 vaginal deliveries. I interviewed doctors until I found one who was right for me -- which meant someone not just well-trained but willing to listen to me. And, like Fitnessman, I'd recommend doing lots of research beforehand.

buttandlegs
06-29-2006, 11:49 AM
I believe C-sections should only be given to those who can not give natural birth because 1. they physically can not. Some smaller women with larger babies really can not. Trust me I have seen it. And many women pre-modern medicine did die trying to give birth when they physically could not. 2. They have a sexually transmitted disease or other type of microorganism that can cause the newborn baby harm. This included Any type of Herpes virus. And some bacteria from the streptococci family.

Getting a C-section to avoid pain, have a shorter hospital stay or be part of a growing trend should not be considered.

Seosaid
06-29-2006, 11:54 AM
Getting a C-section to avoid pain, have a shorter hospital stay or be part of a growing trend should not be considered.


Isn't a C-section MORE painful than natural birth???

Even recovery time is longer??

buttandlegs
06-29-2006, 12:26 PM
Isn't a C-section MORE painful than natural birth???

Even recovery time is longer??

I meant for those people who are terrified of giving birth naturally, vaginally.

deeyala
06-29-2006, 12:47 PM
I meant for those people who are terrified of giving birth naturally, vaginally.
this poll was actually triggered by a couple of those..
they got me thinking 'C sections are the way to go, since medecine got so advanced now".
like vaginal deliveries were means of giving birth pre-evolution :D
i made this poll, because i think 'natural" IS natural and thus all good.
i am glad everyone in here straightened things out for me..

and fitnessman, great link- yes, i'll certainly get myself educated..

alohafitness
06-29-2006, 01:15 PM
I haven't had a baby yet, but I've thought about it a lot and feel that the midwife/doola experience and a water birth is the way I'd like to go. BUT I was watching "Dr. 90210", a reality show featuring high-profile plastic surgeons and their patients, and one of the Doctors (a woman) decided to have an elective C-section. I wonder why? I know there's a scar w/the C-section, but obviously a plastic surgeon wouldn't worry about that. So I wonder, vanity and health-wise, if there are other reasons for an elective C-section?

Ninja J
06-29-2006, 01:22 PM
Well, everyone pretty much answered it. Vaginal is the way to go. C-sections should be saved for only emergencies or special situations where the mother cannot physically give birth without risking her life or the child's.

That being said; every delivery is different. Completely different. Just because a friend had a painful, super long, horrible labor, doesn't mean you're going to have one. Sometimes it also varies on genetics. My labor was actually pretty fast for it being my first. Well, the "active" part of it anyhow. Within 3 hours of my water breaking my daughter was here. I had an epidural, dilated at 5cm, by the time the epidural kicked in (15 minutes later), I was dialted to an 11. They could see her head. I also had back labor, which is pretty painful. But to me all that depends on the woman and your threshold for pain. They had given me a sedative after my water broke because the contractions were so painful, plus they got tired of me yelling at them. It didn't put me to sleep, just in my own little world. It only lasts for an hour. The epidural guy was late, and it took him an hour and a half to get there.
Fast labors however, do run in my family. My mother, my mother's mom, my half-sister,we all popped out the kids within a few hours.
They were actually pretty shocked with mine, given it was my first. They were expecting to wait another 4-6 hours after they gave me the epidural.

I did tear a little. Only a little though. It was painful to pee for a while, but other than that, fine.
To be pregnancy is the worst part, giving birth was a breeze. Pregnancy last 9 months... I was in labor a "total" of 26 hours. I had contractions starting 10pm the night before, by 9pm the next night my water broke(that's when the contractions REALLY hurt), and 3 hours after that she was here.

Ninja J
06-29-2006, 01:25 PM
I haven't had a baby yet, but I've thought about it a lot and feel that the midwife/doola experience and a water birth is the way I'd like to go. BUT I was watching "Dr. 90210", a reality show featuring high-profile plastic surgeons and their patients, and one of the Doctors (a woman) decided to have an elective C-section. I wonder why? I know there's a scar w/the C-section, but obviously a plastic surgeon wouldn't worry about that. So I wonder, vanity and health-wise, if there are other reasons for an elective C-section?
I call it laziness. When you have a c-section it requires no work on the mother's part. So they can go in, in full make up, and look like a million bucks for the pictures they take on the day of the child's birth. Plus, some women I think, tend to thik that after the give birth vaginally, that their vagina is forever "stretched" out. Which is not true.

fitnessman
06-29-2006, 01:30 PM
I haven't had a baby yet, but I've thought about it a lot and feel that the midwife/doola experience and a water birth is the way I'd like to go. BUT I was watching "Dr. 90210", a reality show featuring high-profile plastic surgeons and their patients, and one of the Doctors (a woman) decided to have an elective C-section. I wonder why? I know there's a scar w/the C-section, but obviously a plastic surgeon wouldn't worry about that. So I wonder, vanity and health-wise, if there are other reasons for an elective C-section?

Other then the Doctors making more money no.

My wife and I were fooled into thinking with our third child that she HAD to have a section. They cut her open with her feeling every cut of the knife. She was screaming that she could feel it...I mean SCREAMING. Finally they gave her enough meds to put her out completly. She was out for at least two hours after the birth...MISSING those important min where Kaitlyn was looking for her Mother. Still pisses me off.

After this birth is when my wife and I decided to do the midwife/doola thing. Dominic's birth was at home in a birthing tub. It was perfect!!! Eating pizza and drinking champange one hour after the birth.

My youngest daugheter Isabella was born at home as well. The medical professionals missed so much on this one..Well I won't go there.

Any women who would like info on how to avoid birth related issues are more then welcome to call Donna from the link I provided or my wife Kelly will be more then happy to chat with you.

We must advocate for out children.

fitnessman
06-29-2006, 01:33 PM
I call it laziness. When you have a c-section it requires no work on the mother's part. So they can go in, in full make up, and look like a million bucks for the pictures they take on the day of the child's birth. Plus, some women I think, tend to thik that after the give birth vaginally, that their vagina is forever "stretched" out. Which is not true.

With a section you also get a nice cath put in to walk around with. Scar tissue for a lifetime and many other not so nice things. This is major surgery.

As far as streched out...Ummmm, my wifes is just fine :)

prettymama417
06-29-2006, 01:45 PM
After having a c-section I think that if it's possible for you to do it naturally, you should. I had been in labor for 22 hours with no progression in labor, no dialation more than 4cm, and after nearly killing myself and my son they decided I was unable to have children naturally. A c-section I don't believe is "the easy way out" unless you're doing it electively and won't even try natural. Out of the 5 women that had babies the same time I did, I was the only one unable to get up and move around well. The recovery time is longer than natural childbirth, because of it being a major surgery. The scar I have is very small, only about 4 1/2-5 inches long and it's down far enough that it's unable to be seen, even in a bathing suit. I will say though that the area has become harder to tone and will probably never be as tight and toned as it used to be. So, I don't recommend requesting a c-section. Discuss things with your dr. Sometimes it may be necessary in some circumstances. Opt for the natural delivery though. Remember, when you're pregant. It's not as much the c-section scar you'll have to worry about, but the stretch marks left behind. Stock up on cocoa butter. It worked well for me. =)

mizone
06-29-2006, 03:02 PM
Whats a doola?

Ninja J
06-29-2006, 04:36 PM
As far as streched out...Ummmm, my wifes is just fine :)
lol :D My husband says the samething. ;) (which is where my sources come from. lol)

Ninja J
06-29-2006, 04:38 PM
Here ya go Mi Zonie :)

What is a doula? Click link.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-doula.htm

northernbelle
06-29-2006, 04:40 PM
I had two c-sections, and not by choice, but by necessity (to save the babies' lives). I made myself get out of bed about an hour after I woke up, and walked the halls every day in the hospital. The pain went away quickly. One of my roommates refused to get out of bed, and 5 days later, she was still in pain. So never having given birth naturally, I am very glad the c-section was an option.

The downside is that the surgeon has to cut through muscle. Now, 27 years later, my stomach will never be flat, no matter how much I work in the gym. But I have two beautiful daughters...

Irish Babe
06-29-2006, 04:44 PM
I work in the medical field, in womens health, and although I dont have kids yet, I guarantee you I will have a c sect because a vaginal birth stretches you out so much. And yes, gravity DOES affect the female organs , I have seen women just bear down and I can see their cervix WITHOUT using a speculum. And bladders fall out , too. One method isnt better that the other, just more recovery with a section.

amber_stone
06-29-2006, 06:45 PM
Hi - I had 2 vaginal births - both using gas - no epidural. Like its been said before, every birth is different. My first was very textbook, 10hrs from first contraction to delivery. I tore with her and was stitched up, you dont feel it at the time. That made it slightly uncomfortable to walk for the first day or so, but otherwise I was fine. The second was induced and was hard and fast, only 3hrs from start to finish. I tore slightly with him too (big baby, 9lb10oz) and wasn't stitched (stupid doctor. I mean he really was an idiot), I had to go in and be redone last year. After I had him though I was walking around straight away and fine. (dont ask about blood loss and breast feeding. I was a disaster :()
As for sex, I can honestly say it was about 100x better afterwards - mainly because of the extra confidence I had after going through the birth.

I live in rural Australia though and I honestly don't know anyone who was offered an elective c-section, it doesn't seem as common over here for whatever reason.

My sister-in-law had c-sections with her 3 kids. She really regrets it - her first got stuck and she had an emergency, then the local dr's all refused to let her have a go vaginally afterwards. Anyone who says its an easy option, hasn't had one :) She was in pain for a few weeks afterwards, not able to lift or do everyday things, on top of the normal sleep deprivation. She also had trouble with the epidural (migraines) which was why I never had one. She was terrified of the epidural after that and was completely knocked out, which meant she didn't see them for a good couple of hours after the birth, and my brother wasn't allowed in when she was under general.

I don't even want to mention about a friend of mine who had part of her uterus stitched into the outside cut. She went to so many (male) doctors over a couple of years to try and find out about the pain, only to be told she was imagining things! (she did finally get re-cut and fixed though).

I think birth is very scary going into it (its something that is so personal you can't really compare to other women), but you have an end goal so it's easier to deal with the pain. And it is true that you do forget (to some extent :P). The ladies who talk about days of labour, either weren't having full-on contractions the entire time (officially my second birth took over 24hrs, but it really only started happening in the last 4), or had a really horrrible doctor. Doctors aren't meant to let you last that long if nothing is happening, they should be helping induce you (drip/breaking water etc).
Sometimes you just have to give up your control and just roll with things, the midwifes are all fantastic, I wish I'd been able to have a home birth, especially a water birth, but it wasn't possible (no local facilities or money :()

mizone
06-29-2006, 06:53 PM
Here ya go Mi Zonie :)

What is a doula? Click link.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-doula.htm

Thanks Ninja!

I always used to say I want to have a c section - prior to any education on the subject. That was based on not wanting any pain. 8 months ago I was in the delivery room when my neice was born, my sister wanted natural but had to take the epidural. Now I will only have a c section if advised for medical reasons.

I was born via c section, and so was my brother and sister, I have heard if you have the first via like this then the rest have to aswell.

Anyhow - lots of good points in this thread and I can't wait till I am pregnant :D

deeyala
06-30-2006, 01:49 AM
I work in the medical field, in womens health, and although I dont have kids yet, I guarantee you I will have a c sect because a vaginal birth stretches you out so much. And yes, gravity DOES affect the female organs , I have seen women just bear down and I can see their cervix WITHOUT using a speculum. And bladders fall out , too. One method isnt better that the other, just more recovery with a section.
i've heard that, too- from a doctor, especially the bladder fall out thing..
2 questions:
how common this comlication gets as you age and your tissues grow older?

and aren't C sections relatively new (ie wasn't that common say 20 years ago) so we wouldn't exactly have enough data on the long term complications? (whereas we have a >2000 years of natural delivery data to compare to :D) wouldn't an abdominal hernia be a possible long-term complication, especially with all the damage to the muscles?

deeyala
06-30-2006, 01:55 AM
Anyhow - lots of good points in this thread and I can't wait till I am pregnant :D
one more here *raises hand* ..
so i like have everything prepared from kids' names to the type of delivery , the only thing remaining is the man who'll actually be their father :D

fitnessman
06-30-2006, 04:51 AM
I work in the medical field, in womens health, and although I dont have kids yet, I guarantee you I will have a c sect because a vaginal birth stretches you out so much. And yes, gravity DOES affect the female organs , I have seen women just bear down and I can see their cervix WITHOUT using a speculum. And bladders fall out , too. One method isnt better that the other, just more recovery with a section.


And this is what is wrong with the medical profession.

Read the link.

deeyala
06-30-2006, 08:06 AM
And this is what is wrong with the medical profession.

Read the link.

but what she said is quite true, fitnessman?

fitnessman
06-30-2006, 08:27 AM
The risk of a bladder "Falling Out" is very slight. Compare that slight risk to having magor surgery. That is the risk to YOU AND YOUR BABY





Third stage Labor represents a first meeting, creating a powerful imprint upon the relationship between mother and baby. When both are undrugged and quiet, fully present and alert, new potentials are invoked, and we discover more about ourselves, and the sacred origins of our capacity to love.


How do you want to meet your child?

Do you really think everything a Doctor tells you is in your best interest? It's up to you to advocate for your childs rights and bring them into this world the best way possible.

I will have my wife get on here later and add some thoughts, she's the pro.

Please noone take offense to my statements, this subject just hits very close to home for me. If I just knew what I know now, Isabella would not be so disabled now.

Sections have a place for sure, just a very small one.

Irish Babe
06-30-2006, 12:19 PM
fitnessman,

how dare you use my quote and say "this is what is wrong with the medical profession" ..many lives have been saved BECAUSE of c-sections. Due to complications with the deliveries of both myself AND my brother , my mother needed 2 sections. My fiance was a section, as his own child. Three of the physicians I work for had them as well. Let's see, have a c -sect or risk my baby's life...I think I'll have a section!. And why would it matter how you SEE your baby delivered? Isnt the fact that your child is alive and breathing enough??

fitnessman
06-30-2006, 01:06 PM
fitnessman,

Let's see, have a c -sect or risk my baby's life...I think I'll have a section!.

Which I agree with 100%


My opinion on the medical community is that they are way to quick to cut women open. Numbers don't lie.

Living and breathing? Have you even remotly looked at what birth drugs are doing to our children?

LiftingIsLife
06-30-2006, 01:33 PM
ok, when the action starts to get 'heated', its time for me to chime in:)

for completeness, i am Male, age 49, and have sons close in age to many
of you. in fact, good place to start:

i have 3 boys. all different deliveries... oldest was the hardest on my
ex. she labored for 19 hours. baby went into distress as she neared
20th hour. had to be rushed into delivery room, and doctor used forceps (sp?) to help get him out. i saw the whole thing. quite trammatic for
all of us. thank God, baby came out fine. even better now, turned out to
be male student of the year, and overall student/athelete of his senior
year prior to graduating from high school. now studying engineering at
UConn. proud dad? you bet, but oh so SCARY a start to his life.
second son. couldnt wait to be born. almost had him in back seat of
car in the way to the hospital. we were NOT even supposed to be
going to the hospital when we started out from the house, simply going
to the doctors office for, yet another, evaluation. half way there, ex
starting screaming, yelling
"'XXXX with the doctors office, go STRAIGHT to the HOSPITAL NOW !!! "
i pull the car right up in front of the building, park on sidewalk right next to
door, grab a wheelchair, push her thru the double doors, yell to the nurse that
the baby was coming, and head straight for delivery room. we get in there,
nurse is frantically trying to reach doctor (any doctor). my ex says HURRY, and as the doctor runs thru the door ONE minute later, wife PUSHES ONCE
and 'mikey' comes flying out, like he was shot from a cannon, right into doctors hands! little guy hasnt stopped flying since, now a pole vaulter
on the HS track team! total labor time, less than 1 hour (includding the car
ride:) again, VERY PROUD dad, but VERY anxious beginning
to his life!
third (and last) son, was a planned C-section. he was inverted (from
normal delivery position) for his last trimester inside. cord was wrapped
around him very strangely. planned it for 10am on a monday morning.
got to the hospital at 9. he was taken out at 10:30am. ex did
remarkably well, even during recovery (which was shorter than we thought).
got some cool pix. amazing seeing two shiney stainless steel BARS holding
her belly open when the doctor picked him up outta there.

so, we saw it all. SHE went thru it all. was any way better than another?

thats an individual choice. learn about all the ways. and DONT let ANYONE
decide for you.

YOU and your husband/wife have to LIVE with the results of your decision.

best,
~lifer

WillDeadliftForFood
07-01-2006, 02:25 PM
The human body is designed to give birth vaginally.

The human body is not designed to have major organs cut open and tinkered with.

Surgery in many, many cases is the only way to go (with childbirth as well as "routine" health problems), but if you can avoid it, why not? The risk of infection, especially now with the quickly evolving staph organisms, is much higher than is generally accepted among the lay public. Not to mention the fact that they have to sever muscle for a c-section, which may never heal properly.

Surgery, of any kind, is not to be taken lightly. The effects can last a lifetime, which is exactly how long you would be regretting a bad choice. For some women, yes, c-sections are the only way to save a baby. When your baby's life is at stake you do what you need to do. But c-section for convenience or to avoid certain side effects of vaginal birth...ludicrous. The body is designed to repair/compensate for damage sustained during childbirth. The body isn't designed to handle surgery of any kind.

Consider me biased. I've spent my whole life around doctors, and I currently claim eight different docs as my own. I do think medicine is the key to healthy living, but the more I study the more I realize that the body is much better suited to handling it's own business in matters like this.

Also note that a lot of the "statistics" quoted about death rates and health issues of pre-modern medicine can be skewed, and many of them are misinterpreted to begin with.

Natural Birth
07-01-2006, 11:32 PM
fitnessman,

how dare you use my quote and say "this is what is wrong with the medical profession" ..many lives have been saved BECAUSE of c-sections. Due to complications with the deliveries of both myself AND my brother , my mother needed 2 sections. My fiance was a section, as his own child. Three of the physicians I work for had them as well. Let's see, have a c -sect or risk my baby's life...I think I'll have a section!. And why would it matter how you SEE your baby delivered? Isnt the fact that your child is alive and breathing enough??
Many parents have become, regretably, "special parents" to merely a livng child, that is trapped inside a broken body. The broken babies come from ignorance of women and their spouses not taking the time to know just about everything in the actual birth.

Few expecting parents, want to know, thinking they are special and will have that perfect birth. They do not study and have no knowledge whatsoever, on correct position of birth, that all drugs cross the placenta and go into the baby's brain and other tissues (no placenta barrier), and that cutting of the mother's body has greater risk then natural, primal birth, and that early umbilical cord clamping, allows for a testable anemic baby.

Many of the early umbilical clamped babies are by missing enzymes, immunities, and hormones, and low on platelets (clot the blood), missing red cells to carry oxygen, and missing white cells to fight infection, are not as healthy as nature intended them to be.

In Canada, such damaged children, now have health care costs for children under one year of age, second to the Senior Citizens. The latter we can understand of their bodies breaking down, but babies, should be healthy, not just a massive living tissue, a live birth. You want healthy babies, and the mother to leave the hosptial healthy, as healthy as she went in. That is a choice, if we take responsibilities to become educated, and to do that, one needs not to trust their medical doctor, blindly, whether a male medical person, or female, whether a surgeon, MD, or midwife, or ambulance medic, too.

Have a signed birth contract of what is NOT done to the childbearing woman's body, or her baby or babies. Take responsibilities, find out before you have regrets.

Regretably, the drugged babies, many looking apparently okay, have subtle to serious long-term effects of being drugged. The C-sections have increased to 1 in 4 births, and that is abnormal, and false security.

Get educated of the facts, and have a signed birth contract, if you are wanting to have a Safe Birth. A Safe Birth That can be for babies born in a tree, actually happened in flood conditions in Africa. No medical persons, present.

The evidence for a choice of a natural primal birth, is such babies thrive. Actually thrive. Most animals know how to have natural primal births. Why not us human beings, too?

What is primal natural birth? It may be using warm water births, rather then drugs It may be not getting sick to get educated on the purpose of the placenta, to see it and touch it and not faint. To allow the natural falling away of it, not tying it, clamping it, or cutting it, ever, unless the cord tore.

It may be trusting in one's body to birth normally in gravity positions, or on one-side, not flat on your back or in semi-birthing positions, and taking drugs. It may be Not rushing the birth as complications of a baby not turned correctly can result in dystocia birth, and panic during the birth, can cause a stuck child, too.

What is a Safe Birth: Keep the mother warm and calm, and hope she understands her body's means, natural, to birth even large 10-pound babies, if mothers have a positive and calm support team. Know that the hip bones actually open to the size needed for the baby to be birthed normally, and there are tendons to stretch, the reason for some labor discomfort. Know that the body produces natural hormones, in most instances, to relieve the labor discomfort.

Know that the duty is of all aids, keep the mother, again, warm and calm and wrap the baby, instantly at birth, never chilling it, and leave the lifeline, the umbilical cord alone. Don't harvest your baby for his/her blood, used in stem cells, and separation of the whole blood for selling of tissues. Blood,because it can be infused, is a tissue, consisting of red cells, white cells, platelets, and a whole lot of nutrition and hormones, and enzymes too. Any one of those components of blood may sell for thousands of dollars, once in the hands of medical labs, and doctors and private cord blood banks. That is the baby's blood, and non others.

Donna
www.lotusbirth.com
www.naturalchildbirthresearch.com
www.cordclamp.com

Petition is available: Protect Babies and Mothers, Too.

jcmets
07-03-2006, 10:27 AM
My first was a c section and my second was a natural vbac. I must say that I wish I never did the c section. I was laid up for about 3 weeks and the scar is large. I tore with my second cuz he was large but I did not feel the stitches when they were put in. and as far as being loose that is not true in my case.. kegals do work well. with the vbac I was out grocery shopping in 2 days. I was up and moving about 2 hrs after delivery.
In my opinion women were meant to give birth not have the doctors decide that it not going fast enough and to do a c section. Yes it hurts like hell but there is a lot of pride to come from being able to say I gave birth naturally...just my 2 cents

beanbag
07-03-2006, 03:56 PM
I've never been pregnant and I've never given birth, but I am the oldest of four kids and the only girl, so my mom's told me some of what her delivery experiences were like. my mom had each of us naturally and without any pain killers whatsoever. she did give birth in a hospital, but she told me she delivered (me. I can't say for my brothers either way) on her hands and knees rather than on her back, because it takes the stress off the internal muscles and organs to have the abdomen hanging rather than pressing down towards the back.

I'm like deeyala here...I've got all my names picked and everything, just no man yet! I've seen a lot of really good arguments for home births and for midwives (and for using bellydancing techniques to deliver!), and I think that if/when my time comes that is the way I'll go.

I do see the use for c-sections under really specific circumstances, but only then. even so...my boss' wife had a baby in february and she had one of the worst pregnancies I've ever heard of. a couple of months into her pregnancy she discovered she had an enormous kidney stone, and for a few months there was a huge fear that the pain from the kidney stone would force premature labor. they put a drain in her side and in the process messed up some nerves or something so one of her legs swelled up to about twice the size of the other. when she was about six or seven months in she went into a lot of extra pain and discovered she had a hernia. since they couldn't operate on her for either the stone or the hernia, there was a huge fear she'd lose the baby because of the pain. her doctors wanted to do a c-section as soon as she hit 36 weeks but she refused, saying she wanted a natural birth. she ended up delivering naturally at eight months, and her baby was nine or ten pounds at birth. she had everything else operated on and fixed, and now a few months later she is back to her pre-pregnancy size and she's running around like nothing ever happened. in my opinion, unless there is absolutely no other way around it, ultra-natural is best.

chevellezgirl
07-03-2006, 04:48 PM
i have yet to have any children, but i have done alot of research and i have decided when it comes time for me, i will have a natural birth. my main reasoning is that i dont like any type of medication (unless its a MUST) only because i dont like putting anything in my body thats not good for me. there are too many risks with all these medications today, so natural is my choice. i would really go and research everything before you decide to have kids (it helped me alot..and i have to say i learned things i never knew) but when it comes down to it, its a personal choice that varies from every woman:)