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topcornr
02-27-2008, 05:49 AM
i know its not good for you but what are the effects on the body if one were to have carbonated water...like i know one is you hold water but what else
thanks alot and i hope this isnt the wrong section to post in

in10city
02-27-2008, 06:03 AM
i know its not good for you but what are the effects on the body if one were to have carbonated water...like i know one is you hold water but what else
thanks alot and i hope this isnt the wrong section to post in
A few things to noodle over while you sip away at your bubbly...

You can read up on a few things related to sodas, carbonation, and citric/ascorbic/phosphoric acids : http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showpost.php?p=23347241&postcount=5
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The acids included in many drinks eat away enamel and make teeth more prone to cavities. The pH of regular and diet sodas ranges from 2.47-3.35. The PH in the mouth is normally about 6.2 to 7.0 slightly more acidic than water. At a PH of 5.2 to 5.5 or below the acid begins to dissolve the hard enamel of teeth. Phosphoric and citric acids contribute to the acidity of soda. Here's how some sodas compare to water as well as to battery acid.

* The threshold pH for enamel dissolution is 5.5.

Product Acid (Low=BAD) Sugar per 12 oz
Pure Water 7.00 (neutral) 0.0
Barq's 4.61 10.7 tsp.
Diet Coke 3.39 0.0
Mountain Dew 3.22 11.0 tsp.
Gatorade 2.95 3.3 tsp
Coke Classic 2.63 9.3 tsp.
Pepsi 2.49 9.8 tsp.
Sprite 3.42 9.0
Diet 7-Up 3.67 0.0
Diet Dr. Pepper 3.41 0.0
Surge 3.02 10.0
Gatorade 2.95 3.3
Hawaiian Fruit Punch 2.82 10.2
Orange Minute Maid 2.80 11.2
Dr. Pepper 2.92 9.5
BATTERY ACID 1.00 0.0
Source: Minnesota Dental Association

Mundell EJ. Popular drinks eat away at tooth enamel. HealthDay News. March 9, 2006. http://www.healthday.com/view.cfm?id=53144
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From Flex, July '04 ... (shut it!)


Q | Are carbonated beverages good for bodybuilders?

A | Carbonated beverages are often viewed as digestive aids because the gas from the carbonation causes distension of the stomach and intestines. This distension is sensed by the gastrointestinal (GI) system and causes an increase in motility--meaning the food that's in the stomach passes through the GI tract at a faster rate. This may be good for decreasing indigestion but bad for enhancing digestion and absorption of nutrients--particularly amino acids from protein.

Carbonation may interfere with absorption because the higher acidity of such beverages inhibits normal secretion of stomach enzymes, such as proteases, which break down protein into amino acids. Carbonated beverages also may somehow force much of the food consumed to sit in the higher part of the stomach, where the enzymes are not found, preventing the normal breakdown of protein.

If food moves more rapidly through the stomach, there is less time for enzymes to do their work. Also, if fewer enzymes are doing their work, some of the protein you've eaten may not get properly digested.

Another problem with drinking a carbonated beverage during a meal is that you may feel less satiated afterward. This was discovered in a study of patients with indigestion and constipation. Carbonated water taken with meals reduced the study subjects' indigestion and constipation, but they were less satiated than when they drank plain water with food.