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View Full Version : B-vitamins possibly cause hypertension like sodium?



S.Rottencrotch
02-05-2008, 03:09 PM
They say excess sodium in a diet will cause hypertension, because of the increased solute concentration in the blood which will cause increased water retention and blood volume.

Well, when taking B-vitamins in excess (that turn your piss yellow), is this overloading your system/blood with lots of extra solutes, which in turn would cause hypertension as sodium would?

in10city
02-05-2008, 03:14 PM
They say excess sodium in a diet will cause hypertension, because of the increased solute concentration in the blood which will cause increased water retention and blood volume.

Well, when taking B-vitamins in excess (that turn your piss yellow), is this overloading your system/blood with lots of extra solutes, which in turn would cause hypertension as sodium would?
Short answer: no.

baarat
02-05-2008, 03:15 PM
They say excess sodium in a diet will cause hypertension, because of the increased solute concentration in the blood which will cause increased water retention and blood volume.

Well, when taking B-vitamins in excess (that turn your piss yellow), is this overloading your system/blood with lots of extra solutes, which in turn would cause hypertension as sodium would?Sodium causes hypertention? I thought this was put to rest years ago. Atheletes need sodium and generally don't get enough.

Baseball_Guy
02-05-2008, 03:50 PM
B vitamins are water soluable which means the body urinates it out. B vitamins do not build up in the body.

Because b vitamins are water soluable I take them multiple times a day so it is present in the blood if needed.

in10city
02-05-2008, 03:53 PM
Sodium causes hypertention? I thought this was put to rest years ago. Atheletes need sodium and generally don't get enough.
How about this much... lol... (I know you've seen this already :) )

http://www.t-nation.com/article/most_recent/sodium_your_secret_weapon
"At two grams per liter of fluid replacement, it's obvious that most athletes do not take in nearly enough sodium. For example, a 225-pound athlete would need to ingest between eight and twelve grams of sodium daily. That's right, 8,000 to 12,000 mg a day."

in10city
02-05-2008, 03:54 PM
B vitamins are water soluable which means the body urinates it out. B vitamins do not build up in the body.

Because b vitamins are water soluable I take them multiple times a day so it is present in the blood if needed.
You are aware of the potential for problems with B6 right?

baarat
02-05-2008, 03:58 PM
How about this much... lol... (I know you've seen this already :) )

http://www.t-nation.com/article/most_recent/sodium_your_secret_weapon
"At two grams per liter of fluid replacement, it's obvious that most athletes do not take in nearly enough sodium. For example, a 225-pound athlete would need to ingest between eight and twelve grams of sodium daily. That's right, 8,000 to 12,000 mg a day."That's a little over the top, yeah think. lol. His research was flawed imo, based on our genome, I don't think so.

in10city
02-05-2008, 04:10 PM
That's a little over the top, yeah think. lol. His research was flawed imo, based on our genome, I don't think so.
Could probably lease youself to a horse stable as a human salt lick :D

baarat
02-05-2008, 04:15 PM
Could probably lease youself to a horse stable as a human salt lick :DNew source for salt.....human cultivation (lay human in hot sun, wait until dark for the ensueing sweat to dry leaving behind
salt deposits) highly prized by lions and hyhenas.....ok that's enough. :)

in10city
02-05-2008, 04:22 PM
New source for salt.....human cultivation (lay human in hot sun, wait until dark for the ensueing sweat to dry leaving behind
salt deposits) highly prized by lions and hyhenas.....ok that's enough. :)
You're right... back to the B6... the one to watch...


Toxicity
Because adverse effects have only been documented from vitamin B6 supplements and never from food sources, safety concerning only the supplemental form of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is discussed. Although vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin and is excreted in the urine, long-term supplementation with very high doses of pyridoxine may result in painful neurological symptoms known as sensory neuropathy. Symptoms include pain and numbness of the extremities and in severe cases, difficulty walking. Sensory neuropathy typically develops at doses of pyridoxine in excess of 1,000 mg per day. However, there have been a few case reports of individuals who developed sensory neuropathies at doses of less than 500 mg daily over a period of months. Yet, none of the studies in which an objective neurological examination was performed reported evidence of sensory nerve damage at intakes below 200 mg pyridoxine daily (24). To prevent sensory neuropathy in virtually all individuals, the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine set the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for pyridoxine at 100 mg/day for adults (see table below) (7). Because placebo-controlled studies have generally failed to show therapeutic benefits of high doses of pyridoxine, there is little reason to exceed the UL of 100 mg/day.