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Clayzinho
09-15-2002, 09:01 PM
Hey, to all you Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu guys out there, I was wondering if we could get this thread going about your personal workout routine for BJJ is, what supplements you take and why? Do you work out any differently SPECIFICLY FOR BJJ? Also, are you a guard player or a top player? Who is your instructor? Do you compete? I'd like to see who the BJJ Crowd is on here...

Oldschool
09-16-2002, 08:32 PM
Originally posted by Clayzinho
Hey, to all you Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu guys out there, I was wondering if we could get this thread going about your personal workout routine for BJJ is, what supplements you take and why? Do you work out any differently SPECIFICLY FOR BJJ? Also, are you a guard player or a top player? Who is your instructor? Do you compete? I'd like to see who the BJJ Crowd is on here...

I'm 17 I started training ju-jitsu about a year ago, started going seriously about 4months ago. I'm training for my first competition. I take a daily vitamin, Prolab Whey and Z-Mass. I weight train for strenght, more then size and i often do cardio balls to the wall. I have ju-jitsu 3 times a week + I do boxing about once a week +weights 4times a week + cardio 2times a week.
And i try to be a top player, but the guard doesn't bother me one bit.

usnjosh
09-17-2002, 11:54 AM
I train at Gracie Barra - Virginia Beach, Virginia under Gustavo Machado.

As far as training goes, I train 6 days per week about 2 hours per day. I have changed to a more rep oriented workout because I am big enough muscle wise and am looking at getting more lean.
As far as supplements go, I take a myoplex and a meal replacement bar every day, as well as take a multi-vitamin.

I do an hour of cardio every other day, both to increase my endurance and to lower my weight. I've decided endurance is the way to go in this sport, as I am getting destroyed by people I outweigh by 65 lbs.

I am normally a bottom player, as I am trying to improve my bottom game. I feel very comfortable from the bottom.

smognogger
09-21-2002, 01:21 AM
woudl jiu jitsu be benificial for hockey? ??? as far as speed power and over all stealh machine gos ??

usnjosh
09-21-2002, 09:29 AM
It would be less than worthless for hockey.

Oldschool
09-21-2002, 11:49 AM
Originally posted by smognogger
woudl jiu jitsu be benificial for hockey? ??? as far as speed power and over all stealh machine gos ??

Well it would make you stronger, and you'd be able to focus your energy better. But there are way better ways to do this. BJJ isn't benificial at all if you look at the big picture.

Clayzinho
09-21-2002, 12:28 PM
As far as Hockey goes, no, it wouldnt help you. In a real fight though, BJJ owns...

weah10
09-22-2002, 03:18 PM
Is brazilian jiu jitsu the same as Capoeira?If not what id the difference?

Clayzinho
09-22-2002, 06:54 PM
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is one hundred and eighty degrees different from Capeira. While Capeira is mainly kicks and pretty dancing, BJJ is mostly about fighting on the ground. Go to BJJ.ORG for more info...

Pro
10-06-2002, 12:48 PM
Capeira is Eddy's fighting from Tekken.

aledef
10-06-2002, 08:21 PM
Vc brasileiro, cara?

Choke ya Out
10-07-2002, 08:23 AM
i trained in vale tudo and muay thai now i am training in bjj and capoeira..... i just started bjj but from what i gather the instuctor in my bjj class was taught by one of the gracies. i'll try and get more info on him soon...

usnjosh
10-10-2002, 07:21 AM
Nice. Testing for my blue belt on Saturday :)

BigN_GayBodyB
10-11-2002, 05:18 PM
Originally posted by Clayzinho
As far as Hockey goes, no, it wouldnt help you. In a real fight though, BJJ owns...

There are better tings than BJJ to use in a fight

Oldschool
10-14-2002, 09:47 PM
Like what? Sticking your cock in the guys ear, ya homo?

usnjosh
10-15-2002, 07:56 AM
*snickers*

NHBfighterDAN
10-15-2002, 05:16 PM
bjj > all

corweiser
11-18-2002, 12:07 AM
BJJ is useful in all forms of life. Someone who studys BJJ understands their body more than most doctors.

corweiser
11-18-2002, 12:11 AM
I'm a defensive tactics instructor for the police academy. I incorporate a lot of BJJ tactics into my classes. It's the best form of the arts around. My co-worker is the national Super heavy weight JJ champion. If any of you guys follow that. His name is Steve Chase. He trains at Shawn Chitwoods in Lexington, Oh. Great school if you live in the area.

Oldschool
11-18-2002, 01:11 PM
Originally posted by corweiser
BJJ is useful in all forms of life. Someone who studys BJJ understands their body more than most doctors.

Common now...Most doctors?

Fat Boy
11-18-2002, 06:45 PM
but still think Zen Do Kai is better

corweiser
12-06-2002, 11:44 PM
Most people in BJJ think it is the best. Same that people in Zen Do Kai think it's the best. I guess it's in who uses it and how well they are trained. The weak spot with BJJ is that it is useless in multiple attackers. That's why we through in some other MMA in our training. But hey, I guess if you through Mike Tyson into a ring with three middle weights, he'll lose too.

sharma
01-02-2003, 12:50 AM
how much does the class cost for a newbi like me i am 15?

Oldschool
01-02-2003, 10:11 AM
Originally posted by sharma
how much does the class cost for a newbi like me i am 15?

Depends on where you take it....Out wehre i take it it's $30 a month for 3 lessons a week...classes being 2 hours long

sharma
01-02-2003, 12:09 PM
i live in NJ

kouchigari
02-02-2007, 05:49 PM
hey everybody, My good friend and training partner, Paul Greenhil - who is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Black Belt under Lloyd Irvin - needs some feedback from you on a project he's working on.

He started an online grappling resource to older and non-traditional grapplers (that includes women, non-competitors, recreational, traditional martial artists, etc.), He really has some INCREDIBLE information!

the website is called:

www.ihateyoungpunks.com

So check out the Site, start getting the emails, and let him know what you think!

www.ihateyoungpunks.com

THANKS!!!

kouchigari
02-06-2007, 08:21 PM
Ttt!!!

Ledfut
02-07-2007, 10:18 AM
one of my colleagues (i teach taekwondo) is a purple belt in bjj. he's showed me some stuff. it's interesting, but definitely not something i would want to rely on in a fight. i'd rather just take my metal rollerball pen and stab the mother****er in the eye.

BORN2LOSE
02-07-2007, 01:18 PM
Hey, to all you Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu guys out there, I was wondering if we could get this thread going about your personal workout routine for BJJ is, what supplements you take and why? Do you work out any differently SPECIFICLY FOR BJJ? Also, are you a guard player or a top player? Who is your instructor? Do you compete? I'd like to see who the BJJ Crowd is on here...

For weights I use mostly compound exercises like squats, shoulder press, deadlift, pull ups, dips, and bench in rep range from 10-15. For cardio I have been jumping rope, intervals on the treadmill and just regular rolling. I take optimum whey, dextrose and creatine sometimes. I train under a Machado purple and I am doing my first tourny on the 18th. I have been told I am close to a blue but I don't want it at this point.

altie
02-07-2007, 08:47 PM
Wow, this thread could be so much better than it is. It's not about what art you think is better, it's about training to get better in your art. There's going to be a lot of crossover between different combat sports there.

I train for full body strength using a 5x5 program including some partial Olympic lifts. Over the course of 3 months or so it's been very helpful. A beginning Westside program first got me serious about weightlifting and I may go back to something similar when I feel I have an appropriate mass to work from.

I plan to do a week or two of barbell complexes once I'm done with my current 5x5. The bit of interval and plyometric type training we do in kickboxing really helps me focus when I'm struggling out from under someone bigger in BJJ. Hopefully some complex work will help me go even further.

falconballer44
02-08-2007, 07:04 PM
rosstraining.com. Buy Infinite Intensity!

kouchigari
02-13-2007, 09:47 AM
Heres another email....

"Survival Secret #7B - The second tip of The Training Triangle is the physical conditioning. Like I said in the last email, sparring does NOT get you into shape. It will reveal what kind of shape you are in, but grappling champions aren't depending on sparring to get them in shape. When you're training for grappling competitions, you need a conditioning routine that focuses on high intensity intervals with short periods of rest. Because it's so easy to be lazy when you're sparring, especially when you get fatigued, you will not give maximum output with continuous movement. There are too many opportunities for you to rest. If you are resting most of the time, instead of moving and bursting, you can't get in shape that way. That's why successful grappling competitors have conditioning coaches that put them thru off-the-mat routines to push their cardio capacity to enable them to be more productive during sparring.

Another mistake that is made with conditioning is applying the wrong type of conditioning to grappling. Long-distance running will get you in shape, but won't produce the best results for grappling like short-distance sprints will. Sprints are close to replicating the physical output of grappling because it requires maximum output for a brief interval, rest, and then repeating the interval. If you do decide to do some kind of off-the-mat cardio program, it must be an interval-type training with burst and rest periods because that's how sparring sessions and grappling matches go. Grapplers burst for periods of time, then they stop to rest, burst again, rest, burst again, and repeat this process until the training period is over. You don't need to be engaging in long distance running or any type of activity where you are at one interval level for a long period of time. If you think sitting on your bicycle at the gym for twenty or thirty minutes is going to help you on the mat, it won't help as much as you think. I agree, it's better than nothing, but it's not giving you what you need to perform on the mat.

If you decide to try an off-the-mat cardio routine, you need to check with your doctor to ensure that it's ok for you to engage in an routine to augment your grappling training. Make sure that the program you are using was put together from someone who knows what they're talking about and the cardio routine was designed specifically for someone of your age group. Don't follow any cardio routines that somebody gives you over the Internet, especially from some young punk that's trying to "toughen up" the OG.

That's enough for today. In email #10, we'll discuss the third and final part of The Technical Triangle, Survival Secret #7C (Mental Conditioning).

Train smarter, let the young punks train harder!
Paul Greenhill (aka The Wise Grappler)
paul@thewisegrappler.com
www.ihateyoungpunks.com
www.thewisegrappler.com

KieMoxie
02-13-2007, 10:15 AM
On mon/tues/thurs I do bjj gi and than on gi wed/fri. I take animal pack daily, on whey, glutamine, creatine, than joint supplement. The biggest thing is GETTING YOUR MEALS IN. I know doing 7:30-10 mon-fri(thai kickboxing before grappling) if I dont get my meals in, its a ****tay workout.

Good nutrition and timing> any supplements you can take. And as crappy as it is, get a jumprope and after your first morning meal do cardio. Jumprope / sprint jumprope/ pushups for as long and as hard as you can(at first 20 minutes will be very hard).

KieMoxie
02-13-2007, 10:19 AM
Heres another email....

"Survival Secret #7B - The second tip of The Training Triangle is the physical conditioning. Like I said in the last email, sparring does NOT get you into shape. It will reveal what kind of shape you are in, but grappling champions aren't depending on sparring to get them in shape. When you're training for grappling competitions, you need a conditioning routine that focuses on high intensity intervals with short periods of rest. Because it's so easy to be lazy when you're sparring, especially when you get fatigued, you will not give maximum output with continuous movement. There are too many opportunities for you to rest. If you are resting most of the time, instead of moving and bursting, you can't get in shape that way. That's why successful grappling competitors have conditioning coaches that put them thru off-the-mat routines to push their cardio capacity to enable them to be more productive during sparring.

Another mistake that is made with conditioning is applying the wrong type of conditioning to grappling. Long-distance running will get you in shape, but won't produce the best results for grappling like short-distance sprints will. Sprints are close to replicating the physical output of grappling because it requires maximum output for a brief interval, rest, and then repeating the interval. If you do decide to do some kind of off-the-mat cardio program, it must be an interval-type training with burst and rest periods because that's how sparring sessions and grappling matches go. Grapplers burst for periods of time, then they stop to rest, burst again, rest, burst again, and repeat this process until the training period is over. You don't need to be engaging in long distance running or any type of activity where you are at one interval level for a long period of time. If you think sitting on your bicycle at the gym for twenty or thirty minutes is going to help you on the mat, it won't help as much as you think. I agree, it's better than nothing, but it's not giving you what you need to perform on the mat.

If you decide to try an off-the-mat cardio routine, you need to check with your doctor to ensure that it's ok for you to engage in an routine to augment your grappling training. Make sure that the program you are using was put together from someone who knows what they're talking about and the cardio routine was designed specifically for someone of your age group. Don't follow any cardio routines that somebody gives you over the Internet, especially from some young punk that's trying to "toughen up" the OG.

That's enough for today. In email #10, we'll discuss the third and final part of The Technical Triangle, Survival Secret #7C (Mental Conditioning).

Train smarter, let the young punks train harder!
Paul Greenhill (aka The Wise Grappler)
paul@thewisegrappler.com
www.ihateyoungpunks.com
www.thewisegrappler.com

I am sorry but if you wrote that "young punk" article I really dont know who you train with, but maybe get a decent gym.

TheClips
03-24-2007, 02:30 AM
one of my colleagues (i teach taekwondo) is a purple belt in bjj. he's showed me some stuff. it's interesting, but definitely not something i would want to rely on in a fight. i'd rather just take my metal rollerball pen and stab the mother****er in the eye.

REALLY?!? I have to wonder exactly what he showed you that you aren't 100% confident that you could kick someone's ass with it!!

Tell you what, challenge him to a friendly full-contact fight. You use your Taekwondo and whatever else you want....Just make sure to tap out when it hurts or you can't breathe!!

Raidersfan15
03-26-2007, 12:35 AM
I may be starting BJJ in a week or so. Would it be beneficial for wrestling, other than conditioning? I mean footwork, and actual moves.

Forrest319
03-28-2007, 02:13 PM
Heres another email....

"Survival Secret #7B - The second tip of The Training Triangle is the physical conditioning. Like I said in the last email, sparring does NOT get you into shape. It will reveal what kind of shape you are in, but grappling champions aren't depending on sparring to get them in shape. When you're training for grappling competitions, you need a conditioning routine that focuses on high intensity intervals with short periods of rest. Because it's so easy to be lazy when you're sparring, especially when you get fatigued, you will not give maximum output with continuous movement. There are too many opportunities for you to rest. If you are resting most of the time, instead of moving and bursting, you can't get in shape that way. That's why successful grappling competitors have conditioning coaches that put them thru off-the-mat routines to push their cardio capacity to enable them to be more productive during sparring.

Another mistake that is made with conditioning is applying the wrong type of conditioning to grappling. Long-distance running will get you in shape, but won't produce the best results for grappling like short-distance sprints will. Sprints are close to replicating the physical output of grappling because it requires maximum output for a brief interval, rest, and then repeating the interval. If you do decide to do some kind of off-the-mat cardio program, it must be an interval-type training with burst and rest periods because that's how sparring sessions and grappling matches go. Grapplers burst for periods of time, then they stop to rest, burst again, rest, burst again, and repeat this process until the training period is over. You don't need to be engaging in long distance running or any type of activity where you are at one interval level for a long period of time. If you think sitting on your bicycle at the gym for twenty or thirty minutes is going to help you on the mat, it won't help as much as you think. I agree, it's better than nothing, but it's not giving you what you need to perform on the mat.

If you decide to try an off-the-mat cardio routine, you need to check with your doctor to ensure that it's ok for you to engage in an routine to augment your grappling training. Make sure that the program you are using was put together from someone who knows what they're talking about and the cardio routine was designed specifically for someone of your age group. Don't follow any cardio routines that somebody gives you over the Internet, especially from some young punk that's trying to "toughen up" the OG.

That's enough for today. In email #10, we'll discuss the third and final part of The Technical Triangle, Survival Secret #7C (Mental Conditioning).

Train smarter, let the young punks train harder!
Paul Greenhill (aka The Wise Grappler)
paul@thewisegrappler.com
www.ihateyoungpunks.com
www.thewisegrappler.com

This is why I like to play basketball to help stay in shape. Bursts of intense activity mixed with brief rest periods. It's also a total body work out unlike a lot of cardio activities that focus mostly on the lower body.

Scraps
05-20-2007, 01:18 AM
Hey, I started out with weight training, which I've done for the past 10 years or so (I'm 34). A little over a year ago I started BJJ training at Paramount BJJ which is now in Downingtown. The only difference in how I train is that I have added a circuit that my instructor gave me (which he got from Lloyd Irvin). It really helps my endurance and keeps me flexible. Being relatively small (5'4" and 105 lbs) and the only female in my school, I need to stay as strong as I can, so I weight train 4-5 days a week and take BJJ 2-3 days a week (depending on my work schedule). So far so good...I'm rolling with the guys and looking forward to competing soon. This is by far the best and most addictive sport I've ever participated in. I LOVE it!!!

jeff_is_samurai
03-03-2008, 10:03 AM
Many of you are just completely misguided about actual fighting. There is no amount of "ninja" in the world to incapacitate more than two possibly three attackers. Bruce Lee, Chuck Liddell, and Royce Gracie would all get beaten down in a fight against multiple people. BJJ teaches the most efficient methods of subduing opponents, albeit on an individual basis.

Nobody should be deluded into thinking any style is dominant over any other, but time has proven BJJ to be best among them so far. Cross training is essential, as is conditioning.

Personally I sport a 22-3 record in MMA competition, and I've only one win due to a strike. Not that striking is worthless; I practiced Muay Thai for a year. It just can take a surprising amount of force to knock someone stupid quickly. Especially if he thinks a blow is coming and cringes up his neck and braces.

On the street anything goes, so this "multiple attacker" nonsense is for the kung-fu movies. One on one, BJJ kills. And against most of the idiot brutes who actually WANT to fight, you won't even be breathing heavy.

After it's all measured, if you have limited time to study just one art, make it BJJ if you're serious about defending yourself.

palbano
03-03-2008, 03:09 PM
Many of you are just completely misguided about actual fighting. There is no amount of "ninja" in the world to incapacitate more than two possibly three attackers. Bruce Lee, Chuck Liddell, and Royce Gracie would all get beaten down in a fight against multiple people. BJJ teaches the most efficient methods of subduing opponents, albeit on an individual basis.

Nobody should be deluded into thinking any style is dominant over any other, but time has proven BJJ to be best among them so far. Cross training is essential, as is conditioning.

Personally I sport a 22-3 record in MMA competition, and I've only one win due to a strike. Not that striking is worthless; I practiced Muay Thai for a year. It just can take a surprising amount of force to knock someone stupid quickly. Especially if he thinks a blow is coming and cringes up his neck and braces.

On the street anything goes, so this "multiple attacker" nonsense is for the kung-fu movies. One on one, BJJ kills. And against most of the idiot brutes who actually WANT to fight, you won't even be breathing heavy.

After it's all measured, if you have limited time to study just one art, make it BJJ if you're serious about defending yourself.


22-3 record? What org's have you fought in?

HitTheSprawl
03-04-2008, 03:53 PM
guard workouts

close guard with a heavybag then move it around.

body lock with legs on the heavybag.

half butterfly guard with heavy bag. work sweeping and moving the bag around.

open guard with a medicine ball. work your squeezing and control.

sit out on your butt then roll sideways, shoulder to shoulder. this works rolling sweeps.

jeff_is_samurai
03-06-2008, 07:51 AM
Yes, 22-3. I've fought for KTK (Konquer the Kage) which is a midwestern promotion based in Wisconsin, and in two "best-of" tournaments when I was in the army. I went 9-1 in the first tourney but lost to an ex-marine with 25 lbs on me! :) The next one I lost my first match but fought well afterwards and landed in the 3rd place fight, which I won. Then I took up "true" MMA with KTK and have been 2-1. I stopped fighting though since now I'm almost graduated from college and can't keep up the regimen.

Zee Deveel
03-06-2008, 04:01 PM
I started BJJ this week, been to two lessons so far and I love it. Learned the Kimura today. :D

I train at Pedro Bessa Jujitsu.

garcia3
05-07-2010, 08:00 AM
Im currently doing the "rippetoe" program MWF and I train BJJ Tu Thu and Sat for about 2 hrs. I just wanna know if anyone is doing anything similar and what your experiences have been. Thanks

JustScrap
05-12-2010, 09:14 AM
Personally it depends on my schedule at the time but I typically like to hit two big lifts with low reps and then hit a metcon workout after that. What you use depends a lot on how much you are training and the intensity of your bjj classes. For example some bjj schools are very conditioning oriented and do a lot of hard rolling while others may focus more on light drilling.

PRETTYBOY209
04-30-2011, 11:58 PM
hey, to all you brazilian jiu-jitsu guys out there, i was wondering if we could get this thread going about your personal workout routine for bjj is, what supplements you take and why? Do you work out any differently specificly for bjj? Also, are you a guard player or a top player? Who is your instructor? Do you compete? I'd like to see who the bjj crowd is on here...

blue belt in charles gracie jiujitsu

The_Animal91
05-02-2011, 09:14 AM
Can anyone tell what the differences are between Japanese JiuJitsu and Brazilian?? I see that there are alot of people in here who train BJJ but does anyone train Japanese JiuJitsu??
Is one more effective then the other??

Sorry for asking but I was thinking about training either one of them or maybe even Judo. I would love to know as much as possible seeing as lots of people in here seem to have lots of experience.

awkwardturtle22
05-02-2011, 10:32 AM
Can anyone tell what the differences are between Japanese JiuJitsu and Brazilian?? I see that there are alot of people in here who train BJJ but does anyone train Japanese JiuJitsu??
Is one more effective then the other??

BJJ is descended from Judo via a guy named Matsuyo Maeda. They're very similar arts, with different focuses caused mostly by their different competition rules. BJJ allows for infinite time on the ground and focuses on complex sweeps, submissions and transitions. Judo allows for you to win entirely on the feet, so must judoka aren't as proficient on the ground but can throw the hell out of you.

Japanese Jujitsu is one of hundreds of different branches. At its best, it's stuff service men learned for a few years while stationed in japan, and usually involves striking, throws and groundwork, often while doing none of them very well. At its worst it's a fat guy in a mall teaching "freestyle jujitsu" to little dragons. Jigoro Kano founded Judo by taking everything he deemed too dangerous to practice at full speed out of traditional japanese jujitsu. In my experience a black belt will be about equal to a mid level BJJ blue belt, and usually not have a very good guard.

Judo has the Olympics, BJJ has big competitions and was heavily developed for use in Vale Tudo (no holds barred) matches in Brazil. JJJ doesn't really have any controls on quality like that. Even with the best intentions, you need to be able to test yourself.

mjlindne
05-02-2011, 02:47 PM
Is brazilian jiu jitsu the same as Capoeira?If not what id the difference?

no, it is not. The difference is that BJJ is practical it actually works. Capoiera is just for show.
hence the huge bjj influence in mma and non-existent capoiera influence.

edit to actually respond to the thread.
Been training jits for 3 years. Trained at Miletich Fighting Systems for a while. Had a lot of cool experiences there. trained with a few UFC guys, like spencer fisher and a bunch of guys from TUF.
Now I teach jits at the university of South Florida's MMA club and train at Gracie Barra Evolution Tampa.
Also, been wrestling for 6 years and trained muay thai intermittently in the past few years.

As for workouts. Right now I'm focused primarily on lifting heavy. I'm trying to get strong for once. I've been a long distance runner for years, full and half-marathons and just recently an ultra, which always helped my cardio for jits for I'm trying to get bigger for once now.

supplements.... nothing I couldn't live without. I like muscle milk for protein, mainly because i tastes good. Also, I take xpand which is a NO sup with creatine in it too.