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Thomas.of.Hunter
11-27-2007, 01:17 PM
My biology prof said that he would give an A to anyone in the class that brings him proof of a beneficial mutation....It has to be completely beneficial...IE sickle cell anemia will not work

hvillpimp524
11-27-2007, 01:19 PM
My biology prof said that he would give an A to anyone in the class that brings him proof of a beneficial mutation....It has to be completely beneficial...IE sickle cell anemia will not work

Here's one..an immunity to all viruses. A genetic mutation such as your cells not being adaptable as a host for a viral organism.

Thomas.of.Hunter
11-27-2007, 01:19 PM
Here's one..an immunity to all viruses. A genetic mutation such as your cells not being adaptable as a host for a viral organism.

have you heard of that?...or are you giving an example of what would be a good mutation?...it has to be an actual mutation that has been recorded

bamatank
11-27-2007, 01:38 PM
There have been fish that live in caves that have mutated to not have eyes because they no longer need them in the dark caves.

riptor
11-27-2007, 01:40 PM
Go to PubMed, and search for beneficial mutations. I just did this a few moments ago in another thread and got back nearly 27,000 results. Good luck, you can search through them yourself.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

Thomas.of.Hunter
11-27-2007, 01:45 PM
There have been fish that live in caves that have mutated to not have eyes because they no longer need them in the dark caves.
that doesn't benefit them

Lager1
11-27-2007, 01:47 PM
http://www.gate.net/~rwms/EvoHumBenMutations.html

Lager1
11-27-2007, 01:48 PM
http://www.gate.net/~rwms/EvoMutations.html

riptor
11-27-2007, 01:49 PM
10. Mutations are essential to evolution theory, but mutations can only eliminate traits. They cannot produce new features.

On the contrary, biology has catalogued many traits produced by point mutations (changes at precise positions in an organism's DNA)--bacterial resistance to antibiotics, for example.

Mutations that arise in the homeobox (Hox) family of development-regulating genes in animals can also have complex effects. Hox genes direct where legs, wings, antennae and body segments should grow. In fruit flies, for instance, the mutation called Antennapedia causes legs to sprout where antennae should grow. These abnormal limbs are not functional, but their existence demonstrates that genetic mistakes can produce complex structures, which natural selection can then test for possible uses.

Moreover, molecular biology has discovered mechanisms for genetic change that go beyond point mutations, and these expand the ways in which new traits can appear. Functional modules within genes can be spliced together in novel ways. Whole genes can be accidentally duplicated in an organism's DNA, and the duplicates are free to mutate into genes for new, complex features. Comparisons of the DNA from a wide variety of organisms indicate that this is how the globin family of blood proteins evolved over millions of years.

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=000D4FEC-7D5B-1D07-8E49809EC588EEDF&page=4

user654415165
11-27-2007, 01:51 PM
Your teacher doesn't seem to understand mutation. It is horribly unlikely that a mutuation will be all good since it is completely random and directionless. It becoems more prevalent so long as it simply makes it more likely to procreate. That doesn't mean it has drawbacks. He is probably sending you on a wild goose chase.

BOLT.
11-27-2007, 01:54 PM
Mutation like evolution? Sorry, dont know what it is. But according to evolution we all started as little mirco cells and evolved into what we are today. Is this related to mutations?

Thomas.of.Hunter
11-27-2007, 01:55 PM
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=000D4FEC-7D5B-1D07-8E49809EC588EEDF&page=4

thanks...but not really "proof" per say of any benefit

US_Ranger
11-27-2007, 01:55 PM
What about little Hercules? Would you consider it beneficial to have a mutated myostatin gene that doesn't limit muscle growth? We can't take into account the steroids that he was given as a child by his wonderful father but the kid seems to be a little tank.

Thomas.of.Hunter
11-27-2007, 01:57 PM
What about little Hercules? Would you consider it beneficial to have a mutated myostatin gene that doesn't limit muscle growth? We can't take into account the steroids that he was given as a child by his wonderful father but the kid seems to be a little tank.

lol

user654415165
11-27-2007, 01:57 PM
What about little Hercules? Would you consider it beneficial to have a mutated myostatin gene that doesn't limit muscle growth? We can't take into account the steroids that he was given as a child by his wonderful father but the kid seems to be a little tank.

Mutated myostatin has this side effect in most babies.... oh yeah death. The lower level of BF% can be deadly in newborns.

mrawdtsi
11-27-2007, 02:09 PM
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u85/hillbillygirl01/Me/cc2f.jpg


2 heads = double the eatin powah!

thats beneficial. Not to mention he could do 2 chicks at the same time

bamatank
11-27-2007, 02:17 PM
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u85/hillbillygirl01/Me/cc2f.jpg


2 heads = double the eatin powah!

thats beneficial. Not to mention he could do 2 chicks at the same time

x2

two heads FTW!!

chump2champ
11-27-2007, 02:28 PM
My biology prof said that he would give an A to anyone in the class that brings him proof of a beneficial mutation....It has to be completely beneficial...IE sickle cell anemia will not work

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?p=100613751#post100613751

Read that post - the HIV immune guys have no harmful side-effects, and wouldn't even have known they were mutants if they hadn't been exposed to the disease and not gotten sick.

squanto
11-27-2007, 02:41 PM
My biology prof said that he would give an A to anyone in the class that brings him proof of a beneficial mutation....It has to be completely beneficial...IE sickle cell anemia will not work

Point mutation in sub-saharan Africa which predisposes humans to sickle-cell anemia (slightly detrimental), thereby inhibiting contraction of malaria (enormously beneficial). Thus increasing fitness and being unquestionably beneficial.

This is also an example of macroevolution as a result of one single mutation.

studmuffinuk
11-27-2007, 03:14 PM
A healing factor like wolverine's is pretty beneficial. Also kick ass is the ability to control metal :D

TricepsNGirls
11-27-2007, 03:16 PM
The teacher doesn't seem to understand the complexities underlying mutation. You can't just assign some undeniably good trait to a single, pronounced mutation.


Anyways, you could talk about mutations within the globin family of proteins. Compare the structure and function of hemoglobin to myoglobin. Show how structure supports function.

To get you started, talk about the positive cooperativity of ligand binding in hemoglobin and how that helps us absorb oxygen in the lungs and drop it off in the tissues. Then, explain why myoglobin does not have this property, and why the lack of it better serves its function.

Hard Drive
11-27-2007, 03:20 PM
Spiderman.

cannonblaster5
11-27-2007, 03:20 PM
My biology prof said that he would give an A to anyone in the class that brings him proof of a beneficial mutation....It has to be completely beneficial...IE sickle cell anemia will not work

the gene that makes you immune to the black plague and HIV

studmuffinuk
11-27-2007, 03:21 PM
Spiderman.

Spiderman wasn't really a mutant, although I guess you could make a case for it.