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amerrocks
08-14-2005, 10:31 AM
I started bodybuilding a month ago and I was 185 pounds with 22.5% bodyfat. I gained 10 pounds over the last month but I am still 22.5% body fat! are those pounds mucles or fat and what can I do to make them visible because I didn't notice any change. How can I go back to 185 pounds but still keep that extra mucles????

skelooth
08-14-2005, 10:33 AM
by giving it more than a month? MAYBE???? a month is NOTHING in this sport.

Augustin
08-14-2005, 10:45 AM
I started bodybuilding a month ago and I was 185 pounds with 22.5% bodyfat. I gained 10 pounds over the last month but I am still 22.5% body fat! are those pounds mucles or fat and what can I do to make them visible because I didn't notice any change. How can I go back to 185 pounds but still keep that extra mucles????

Having a body fat measurement is great, but only a piece of the puzzle. Take other measurements as well to record your progress. This can include chest, biceps, waist, and thighs. If those measurements are increasing, but your body fat is remaining level, you're gaining muscle, but also maintaining your current fat.

If your body fat is remaining constant, you may need more of a caloric deficit to lose that fat. Budget your daily caloric intake around 10 calories for every pound of lean muscle mass. Do not make plans to feed your entire weight, as that equation also includes fat. Planning to feed your lean muscle mass and not your fat will give you enough of a deficit to begin losing it.

One month is certainly not enough time to pass for any drastic results. Your physique will change, but typically over a 3-4 month period.

amerrocks
08-14-2005, 10:58 AM
thanx man but as I said, I haven't seen any changes and until a week ago, I didn't weigh myself. I thought that I stayed the same but withour even noticing it, I gained 10 pounds so what's up with that?

HatesFat
08-14-2005, 11:21 AM
lemme see if i can get the math right... 22.5% of the 10lbs you gained must have been fat, so the rest was muscle. Good job!

ellipticer
08-14-2005, 11:24 AM
Sounds like a reading from a body fat scale and those are not accurate. Use the size of your jeans as the guide or buy a set of calipers.

Killazer
08-14-2005, 12:01 PM
most of what you gained was muscle if you are the same bf% at 10 lbs heavier. That is a good direction to go.

KeeperOfTheBeer
08-14-2005, 02:36 PM
If your body fat is remaining constant, you may need more of a caloric deficit to lose that fat. Budget your daily caloric intake around 10 calories for every pound of lean muscle mass. Do not make plans to feed your entire weight, as that equation also includes fat. Planning to feed your lean muscle mass and not your fat will give you enough of a deficit to begin losing it.

What the...? 10 calories for every pound of muscle per day?? Where did you get this from? I'm 150 pounds. According to that, I should be eating 1500 calories per day if I was PURE MUSCLE. I've got no clue what my body composition is like, but it has to be much less than half of that in muscle.

Sorry if I'm reading your post completely wrong.

A good method for finding a healthy daily caloric intake is taking your body weight and multiplying by 15 (your maintenance level), and subtracting ~500 or so calories to make the daily deficit. This is just an estimate. Find what works for you.

Augustin
08-14-2005, 04:55 PM
What the...? 10 calories for every pound of muscle per day?? Where did you get this from? I'm 150 pounds. According to that, I should be eating 1500 calories per day if I was PURE MUSCLE. I've got no clue what my body composition is like, but it has to be much less than half of that in muscle.

Sorry if I'm reading your post completely wrong.

A good method for finding a healthy daily caloric intake is taking your body weight and multiplying by 15 (your maintenance level), and subtracting ~500 or so calories to make the daily deficit. This is just an estimate. Find what works for you.

That comes directly from my Sports and Exercise Nutrition college textbook. I'm studying the subject right now, so I think I know what I'm talking about. That figure is your BMR. You'll need to add calories for any activity outside of normal function. If you are a construction worker, as an example, you'll need additional calories to provide energy for that given task. An office worker would of course need a lot less, if any adjustment.

You always start with your BMR and build from that. Intense weight training requires 0.061 calories for every pound of lean muscle mass, per minute of activity. Your calculation of 15 times your weight means that you're also calculating 15 times the amount of fat you are currently carrying and making plans to feed well above maintenance.

NEVER budget calories to support adipose tissue. Calories should only be budgeted for lean muscle mass and daily activity above your BMR.

PinZ
08-14-2005, 05:03 PM
You always start with your BMR and build from that. Intense weight training requires 0.061 calories for every pound of lean muscle mass, per minute of activity. Your calculation of 15 times your weight means that you're also calculating 15 times the amount of fat you are currently carrying and making plans to feed well above maintenance.


All well and good... but despite what all the textbooks say... always go by how you feel, what you see changing, and what suits you. Use figures as a rough guide and you will most likely see results, but never expect them to be spot on, as everyone is different.

-T

Augustin
08-14-2005, 05:10 PM
All well and good... but despite what all the textbooks say... always go by how you feel, what you see changing, and what suits you. Use figures as a rough guide and you will most likely see results, but never expect them to be spot on, as everyone is different.

-T

That is correct Pinz. You have to start with a guide and that's what I provided. Adjustments are always necessary. I never said he couldn't change anything, but he needs to start at the appropriate level and build from there.

Genetics will always play an important role.