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View Full Version : Paneer from skim milk instead of cottage cheese



rhollan
10-20-2007, 01:04 AM
I hate cottage cheese. It's gross, and tasteless. However, it is a great source of caesin, with is an ideal protein to consume before bed.

I was wondering if I could substitute paneer made from skim milk. I like paneer.

For those who don't know, paneer is (generally home made) Indian-style cottage cheese: milk is brought to a boil, curdled with lemon or buttermilk, cooled, the whey expressed, and the curds clumpt together, in a cheese cloth, and then pressed into a block of very young cheese.

Normally paneer is made with whole fat milk, but there is no reason it can't be made with skim milk instead, to reduce the fat content.

user904390349034903
10-20-2007, 01:12 AM
I hate cottage cheese. It's gross, and tasteless. However, it is a great source of caesin, with is an ideal protein to consume before bed.

I was wondering if I could substitute paneer made from skim milk. I like paneer.

For those who don't know, paneer is (generally home made) Indian-style cottage cheese: milk is brought to a boil, curdled with lemon or buttermilk, cooled, the whey expressed, and the curds clumpt together, in a cheese cloth, and then pressed into a block of very young cheese.

Normally paneer is made with whole fat milk, but there is no reason it can't be made with skim milk instead, to reduce the fat content.

Why not try 4% milk cottage cheese. I usually eat that with toasted whole wheat bread. taste much better than the 1%.

rhollan
10-20-2007, 01:21 AM
Why not try 4% milk cottage cheese. I usually eat that with toasted whole wheat bread. taste much better than the 1%.

That would have more fat than protein, no?

user904390349034903
10-20-2007, 01:23 AM
it'll have a little more fat, but it makes cottage cheese bearable to eat at least.

Jules Verne
10-20-2007, 02:42 AM
Sounds good. Basically the same as CC and since most people add a fat source anyway like PB - just add less fat to your pre-bed meal if you make it with whole milk.

Also whole food protein is probably just as good - steak, fish, chicken etc.. pre-bed - I do find eggs/egg white digests too fast for me though. Probably steak.beef would be the best out of those other choices.

The Solution
10-20-2007, 05:13 AM
That would have more fat than protein, no?

no.. 4% will yield about 5-7g of fat and about 2.5g of sat fat and still ur usual 12-16g of protein per half cup...

dont stress or google it to make sure..

rhollan
10-20-2007, 08:55 AM
no.. 4% will yield about 5-7g of fat and about 2.5g of sat fat and still ur usual 12-16g of protein per half cup...

dont stress or google it to make sure..

Made from whole (3.25%BF) milk, at http://www.recipezaar.com/21956, I get "Nutrition Infomation: PER OUNCE (paneer): 100 calories, 7 g protein, 2 g carbohydrate, 7 g fat (5 g saturated)"

I might try to make some from skim milk. I prefer less saturated saturated fat, as a proportion of total fat and calories. I can always agument with fat from a different source.

pacificgrl
10-20-2007, 09:13 AM
or you could try farmer cheese which is dry curd cottage cheese. it doesn't taste like very much.

couldn't you also do plain yogurt?

Jules Verne
10-20-2007, 12:07 PM
I might try to make some from skim milk. I prefer less saturated saturated fat, as a proportion of total fat and calories. I can always agument with fat from a different source.

Yea you probably want more protein than fat (in grams at least) in any meal I can think of.

rhollan
10-20-2007, 12:43 PM
or you could try farmer cheese which is dry curd cottage cheese. it doesn't taste like very much.

couldn't you also do plain yogurt?

I DO like cheese curds, quite a bit actually.

I like middle eastern style yogurt, as well as Indian lassi (but that has way to many carbs), but not the mass market stuff. I used to associate with an Iranian fellow about 20 years ago, and a local restaurant would serve yogurt designed to be eaten with "scoops" of raw onion (fruit with yogurt? Blech!) along with the meal. THAT was good yogurt.

Mmm, needed some healthy fats with lunch: lean turkey with pb&c (peanut butter and celery).

I'll have to try and make some paneer and see. It can be flavoured with cardomom, etc.

tinyman5000
10-20-2007, 01:50 PM
this cheese sounds really good can we get a specific recipe and does it end up hard at the end?

The Solution
10-20-2007, 02:49 PM
this cheese sounds really good can we get a specific recipe and does it end up hard at the end?

im downto also try n make some CC.. def hit it up with the recipe if you get it OP

rhollan
10-20-2007, 05:08 PM
Ingredients:

1 gallon milk (whole (3.25%), 2%, 1%, or skim depending on desired fat content)

juice from 2 lemons (or limes, or vinager, but lemons or limes are best)

Materials:

cheesecloth (4 layers, usually two packages)
collander
heavy book, food cans, etc.

Procedure:

Heat milk in a LARGE stock pot almost to boiling, stirring to keep it from sticking. Milk will increase in volume dramatically as it gets close to a boil, so be careful! If you only have a small pot, use 1/2 gallon (and adjust rest of recipie).

When milk is almost boiling, take it off the heat, add lemon juice (or other acidifying agent) SLOWLY, while stirring in one direction, until it curdles. Wait for it to cool.

Place cheesecloth in collander and the combination in sink, and filter the curds and whey.

Rinse the raw cheese gently under cold running water to remove all trace of acid. The chesse at this point is called "channa"

Draw the sides of the cheese cloth together, knot, and hang from a cupbord over the sink or over a pot to catch the drippings. Let drip for 1/2 hour.

While still in the cheesecloth, press the cheese to extract as much moisture as possible, tie a tighter knot (if possible), compress between two plates, place a heavy weight on the top plate, and express more moisture over night in the fridge.

The cheese at this point is called "paneer" (alternately paner, or panir). It can be cut into small pieces, eaten as is, or fried (it does not melt).

I'm in the process of making some. It can be laced with spices, and I thought to try saffron (since it goes so well with warm milk).

As for nutritional value, I defer to http://www.doctorndtv.com/FAQ/detailfaq.asp?id=8353 :

"100 gms of paneer made from cow milk provides 18.3 gms of protein, 20.8 gms of fat, 2.6 gms of minerals, 1.2 gms of carbohydrates, 265 kcal of energy, 208 mgs of calcium, 138 mg of phosphorous. It contains reasonably good amounts of fat and cholesterol."

Now, the fat content can be controlled by the percentage of fat in the milk. Skim milk has no fat.

rhollan
10-20-2007, 05:19 PM
this cheese sounds really good can we get a specific recipe and does it end up hard at the end?

See above for a recipie, and while it does not get hard, it does hold a shape, and can be cut into smaller pieces.

Another recipe is at http://www.nandyala.org/mahanandi/archives/2005/06/06/delightful-paneer/

The Solution
10-20-2007, 06:27 PM
Ingredients:

1 gallon milk (whole (3.25%), 2%, 1%, or skim depending on desired fat content)

juice from 2 lemons (or limes, or vinager, but lemons or limes are best)

Materials:

cheesecloth (4 layers, usually two packages)
collander
heavy book, food cans, etc.

Procedure:

Heat milk in a LARGE stock pot almost to boiling, stirring to keep it from sticking. Milk will increase in volume dramatically as it gets close to a boil, so be careful! If you only have a small pot, use 1/2 gallon (and adjust rest of recipie).

When milk is almost boiling, take it off the heat, add lemon juice (or other acidifying agent) SLOWLY, while stirring in one direction, until it curdles. Wait for it to cool.

Place cheesecloth in collander and the combination in sink, and filter the curds and whey.

Rinse the raw cheese gently under cold running water to remove all trace of acid. The chesse at this point is called "channa"

Draw the sides of the cheese cloth together, knot, and hang from a cupbord over the sink or over a pot to catch the drippings. Let drip for 1/2 hour.

While still in the cheesecloth, press the cheese to extract as much moisture as possible, tie a tighter knot (if possible), compress between two plates, place a heavy weight on the top plate, and express more moisture over night in the fridge.

The cheese at this point is called "paneer" (alternately paner, or panir). It can be cut into small pieces, eaten as is, or fried (it does not melt).

I'm in the process of making some. It can be laced with spices, and I thought to try saffron (since it goes so well with warm milk).

As for nutritional value, I defer to http://www.doctorndtv.com/FAQ/detailfaq.asp?id=8353 :

"100 gms of paneer made from cow milk provides 18.3 gms of protein, 20.8 gms of fat, 2.6 gms of minerals, 1.2 gms of carbohydrates, 265 kcal of energy, 208 mgs of calcium, 138 mg of phosphorous. It contains reasonably good amounts of fat and cholesterol."

Now, the fat content can be controlled by the percentage of fat in the milk. Skim milk has no fat.

a pretty sweet recipe.. but i found an easier one as on the food network this guy made CC with only a few ingrediants.. so i think i might give that a shot when i come home for thanksgiving.. but im giving u reps for ur recipe tho

rhollan
10-20-2007, 06:50 PM
a pretty sweet recipe.. but i found an easier one as on the food network this guy made CC with only a few ingrediants.. so i think i might give that a shot when i come home for thanksgiving.. but im giving u reps for ur recipe tho

Thanks.

It turns out you can express the excess moisture in 1-2 hours. I'm enjoying some saffron-laced paneer now! MUCH better than CC!!

tinyman5000
10-20-2007, 06:53 PM
Thanks.

It turns out you can express the excess moisture in 1-2 hours. I'm enjoying some saffron-laced paneer now! MUCH better than CC!!

i might make some monday

rhollan
10-20-2007, 06:56 PM
i might make some monday

Be warned that you don't get much from a gallon of milk: a small saucer full.

I'm munching on some now. Next time, I think I'll lace it with cardommon.