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View Full Version : Just how do they work it out ?



YuMadThough
04-28-2005, 09:46 AM
How do all these food companies know how much protien, fat and carbohydrates is in their products.

I know they can figure out the calories by adding the totals of this formula:-

Total Calories = fat x 9 + Protein x 4 + Carbs x 4

But how do they get the numbers for fat protein ect of a certain food in the first place?

mindraper
04-28-2005, 12:02 PM
Good question..

It must be somekind of studies and measurements that can give you the figures.

limey
04-28-2005, 12:13 PM
I believe the FDA regulates the requirements for what food companies must test for. The companies take a large sample of their products on regular intervals and test it for its content on a regular basis. The nutrition labels are the average of those tests.

Macros
04-28-2005, 12:25 PM
constitution of total ingredients / serving size....

limey
04-28-2005, 12:27 PM
constitution of total ingredients / serving size....

Oh, are we talking about manufactured products or raised (meats, veggies, grains, etc) products?

xxghostxx
04-28-2005, 12:31 PM
How do all these food companies know how much protien, fat and carbohydrates is in their products.

I know they can figure out the calories by adding the totals of this formula:-

Total Calories = fat x 9 + Protein x 4 + Carbs x 4

But how do they get the numbers for fat protein ect of a certain food in the first place?

They use an instrument called a bomb calorimeter which measures heat energy released when foods are burned, giving an approximate amount of energy available in foods. They can measure either the amount of heat released, or oxygen consumed and assign a numeric value to it. And this is where the calories are named, as it's the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one gram of water by 1g celcius from initial starting temperature.

rockstarsar
04-28-2005, 08:34 PM
They use an instrument called a bomb calorimeter which measures heat energy released when foods are burned, giving an approximate amount of energy available in foods. They can measure either the amount of heat released, or oxygen consumed and assign a numeric value to it. And this is where the calories are named, as it's the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one gram of water by 1g celcius from initial starting temperature.

Bump to that. In my science class last semester we burned Cheetos and Fritos in a cruder version of the industry standard bomb calorimeters. The oil coming off those things was disgusting.

metamoto
04-28-2005, 08:48 PM
* Thats 1 Liter of water 1 degree Celcius. ;)

BodyBuild03
04-28-2005, 10:15 PM
* Thats 1 Liter of water 1 degree Celcius. ;)

actually he's right... it's one gram of water my friend... which is about 1ml... given the density of water is 1g/ml... that would be 1000x a calorie as 1000ml = 1 liter...

calorie as ghost said is the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1C from initial temp. @ 1 atm (aka atmospheric pressure)

dexterium
04-28-2005, 10:21 PM
I forget which chemical it was that we used for our bomb calorimeter experiment. However, I do remember distilling cherry coke and making soap... mine turned out really ****ty.