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adobe
04-08-2005, 04:59 AM
So many of us have been there before, shoulder injuries......and we have to pause our training, some have to stop theirs for weeks, or for months, or even they have to stop BB which was their life....If you want to cure the injuries then ask the doctor, and if you think BB is your life and want to do it forever.....then preventing injuries should be one of your goal too !

The most common injuries in sports are to the shoulder. The overhead (military) press and deep dips both put huge amounts of stress on the shoulder (see tip No. 2). So does throwing a baseball, swimming, rowing, or swinging a racquet--anything that repeatedly puts your arm over your head, or raises it out to the side or pulls it in, exerting lots of extra force on the shoulder joint.

The problem is that the shoulder isn't as strong as it looks. The humerous (upper-arm bone) has a large range of motion only because it dangles precariously off the edge of the body. The humeral head is pulled sideways against the socket of the scapula (the shoulder blade) by a series of four small upper-back muscles collectively called the rotator cuff. These muscles are the foundation, the unsung heroes, the glue that holds the shoulder joint together. When they ate weak or overpowered, the humerus gets out of line and undue stress is placed on tendons and ligaments. And you feel pain.

Shoulder Injury-Prevention Tips:

Strengthening the rotator cuff

It's easy to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles, if you can remember to work them, that is. Since these so-called "precision" muscles (which precisely center the humeral head) are invisible from the outside, they're easy to overlook. Big mistake.
We love to build up the glamorous "outside" muscles, the triceps, biceps, delts, lats. Ironically, the stronger these get relative to the rotator cuff, the more at risk you are of pulling the humerus out of its tenuous socket, injuring the AC joint (the juncture of the clavicle and the acromion, the front of the shoulder blade) and even tearing some tendons. Let's see the exercises:

The three following exercises will hit the four RC muscles. Start with two- or three-pound weights in each hand and work up. Do three sets of 10 to 15 reps twice a week. Routines should run 20 minutes max.

SUPRASPINATUS, the muscle that helps the deltoid raise the arm to the side and aids outward arm rotation. Exercise: Hold dumbbells by your sides in a sitting position, then raise both your hands straight out to the sides. Lower slowly.
INFRASPINATUS/TERES MINOR, two muscles that help pull the arms downward (as in a pull-up). Exercise: Lie on your side on a bench with weight in hand, your elbow touching your hip and your arm bent at a right angle. Rotate your arm upward, pivoting your elbow as you lift the weight away from the bench. Slowly lower.
SUBSCAPULARIS, a muscle on the front of the shoulder blade that assists with inward rotation of the arm. Exercise: With your elbow at your side and your forearm at a 90-degree angle, turn sideways. Push/pull elastic bands in a parallel arc across your body. Turn and repeat on the opposite side.


Avoiding extreme ranges of motion while weightlifting

Extreme ranges of motion can overstress any joint. That's especially true for the shoulder, which bears the brunt of upper-body weightlifting stress. "Reaching your arms too far backward on, say, a pectoral contraction is risky, for an obvious reason: At the farthest point, the shoulder joint is not supported by muscles anymore--only tendons and ligaments. With the pressure of heavy weights, you risk rotator cuff injuries." Therefore, the key to weight-room safety is not necessarily avoiding certain exercises altogether, but avoiding going too far. Weightlifter's one general rule: Keep the elbows and the press/pull bars in front of your body on all exercises. Any time you put your body below or in front of your elbows--an unnatural position--you're asking for trouble. This creates excessive leverage on the head of the humerus bone, stretching the connective tissue around the shoulder joint. Given those parameters, the list of at-risk exercises is long. It starts with weight-room enemy No. 1, the military press, and even includes a few old favorites that may seem perfectly safe, like dips and push-ups.

MILITARY PRESS

Targets: Shoulder, upper back, triceps
Avoiding injury: Use lighter weight and higher reps (heavier weight can cause you to compromise form and creates shearing forces at the shoulder joint), and try to keep the upward thrust slightly forward. Don't let your elbows go behind your body. Better yet, use a bench with a slight incline, which will help keep the bar in front of you at all times. (Also, keep your lower back flat on the bench rather than arching it. This will help prevent a back injury.)

BENCH PRESS

Targets: Chest, shoulders, triceps
Avoiding injury: To ensure that your body remains in front of your arms, lower the bar to the point where your elbows are level to, not lower than, the horizontal plane of your body. (By keeping your elbows out away from your body, you'll be able to bring the bar down closer to your chest for a greater range of motion.) Placing your knees up and your feet flat on the bench helps to protect your lower back, which again can be vulnerable if you compromise form.

PUSH-UP

Targets: Chest, shoulders, triceps
Avoiding injury: Risky when you lower your chest all the way to the ground, below the elbow, because this position again puts your upper arm behind your body. Push- Up Plus: From a moderate depth, push yourself up, maintaining a straight body line. Then spread your shoulder blades apart and try to create a little hump between them. This strengthens the scapular muscles of the shoulder blades, which support the humerus joint.

DIP

Targets: Chest, shoulders, triceps
Avoiding injury: This one is suspect to begin with because your arms start in an unnatural position--behind you. Dips can put shearing force on the shoulder joint, and can eventually damage the rotator cuff if you dip too low and are weak and heavy. Machine dips are safer because your arms are positioned in front of your body.

MACHINE FLYE

Targets: Chest, shoulders
Avoiding injury: Risky in extreme hands-back position (again putting too much leverage on the head of the humerus). Start the exercise with the pads even with your chest.




Source: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1608/is_3_18/ai_83343027

scott_donald
04-08-2005, 05:55 AM
not bad a read thanks...

adobe
04-08-2005, 07:09 AM
I saw lots of people came here and ask about shoulder injuries....Now...I posted a topic about how to prevent shoulder injuries, and no body seems even care....

...no wonder, BB.com is really a great thread....I guess..

DavetheDog
04-08-2005, 07:14 AM
It was my impression that a lot of RC injuries are not due to weak rotator cuffs per se, rather imbalance between external rotators and internal rotators. Eg too much benching resulting in weak external rotators comparatively.

The article would be much better if it detailed cable rows, lat pulls and external rotations that would help even things up.

adobe
04-08-2005, 07:20 AM
Finally, a response ! Thanks !

tazzmaniac
04-08-2005, 07:29 AM
Superb effort! I must say I am deeply impressed. I knew that it was a good idea to train these "obscure" muscles and I started by incorporating then in my delt training. I must say, they are no ego boosers (the girls at my gym were gigling when passing by) because of the ridiculously easy weights. Well, we train the muscles, not the ego. I've suffered a slight shoulder injury and it wasn't comfortable.

LRTF2005
04-08-2005, 08:24 AM
i am suffereing from a shoulder injury now and i must say strength of rotator cuff alone is not enough you need flexibility and balance of forces around the shoulder joint and you need a LOT of warm-up before any upper body workout and stretching after

DavetheDog
04-08-2005, 08:44 AM
Superb effort! I must say I am deeply impressed. I knew that it was a good idea to train these "obscure" muscles and I started by incorporating then in my delt training. I must say, they are no ego boosers (the girls at my gym were gigling when passing by) because of the ridiculously easy weights. Well, we train the muscles, not the ego. I've suffered a slight shoulder injury and it wasn't comfortable.

Exactly - the health of your joints is much more important than impressing a bit of skirt. I've had problems with my shoulders on and off, so I'm quite careful now. Better that then going through the injuries again.

SpreeWheels24
04-08-2005, 04:03 PM
The three following exercises will hit the four RC muscles. Start with two- or three-pound weights in each hand and work up. Do three sets of 10 to 15 reps twice a week. Routines should run 20 minutes max.
[list=a]
SUPRASPINATUS, the muscle that helps the deltoid raise the arm to the side and aids outward arm rotation. Exercise: Hold dumbbells by your sides in a sitting position, then raise both your hands straight out to the sides. Lower slowly.
INFRASPINATUS/TERES MINOR, two muscles that help pull the arms downward (as in a pull-up). Exercise: Lie on your side on a bench with weight in hand, your elbow touching your hip and your arm bent at a right angle. Rotate your arm upward, pivoting your elbow as you lift the weight away from the bench. Slowly lower.
SUBSCAPULARIS, a muscle on the front of the shoulder blade that assists with inward rotation of the arm. Exercise: With your elbow at your side and your forearm at a 90-degree angle, turn sideways. Push/pull elastic bands in a parallel arc across your body. Turn and repeat on the opposite side.
i]
can you show with more detail on how to these excersices, like videos or pictures. I think i understand the first two, but the last one confuses me

$AJ
04-08-2005, 04:05 PM
Men's fitness :/

adobe
04-09-2005, 12:33 AM
Before we talk about the details of those strengthen shoulder exercises, it's important to know that every shoulder exercises should be performed after flexion exercises:

Here is a flexion exercise involving external rotation of the shoulder simply using a broom stick[/b]:

Preparation:
Grasp end of pole to side of head with other end of pole behind arm. Bring elbow forward slightly and bend wrist back. Reach around body with opposite arm and grasp lower end of pole. Place pole in middle of the back side of the upper arm. Position elbow at height of shoulder.
Execution
Pull lower end of pole forward so shoulder is externally rotated.. Hold stretch. Repeat with opposite arm.


Here is a flexion exercise involving internal rotation of the shoulder simply by using a broom stick:

Preparation
Grasp pole at one end and position overhead with other end of pole behind opposite arm. Grasp other end of pole with hand positioned below elbow. Position elbow at height of shoulder.
Execution
Pull upper end of pole forward so shoulder is internally rotated. Hold stretch. Repeat with opposite arm.


Now, let's talk about details of each exercises which have been asked:

Suprasinatus
The supraspinatus is the most often injured rotator cuff muscle. The inability to smoothly abduct the arm against resistance may indicate a rotator cuff injury. The suprasinatus' weakness:
Increased risk of shoulder injury during shoulder flexion and abduction activities, specifically when elbow travels below shoulder during shoulder abduction. Risk is compounded with a winged scapula condition.
Examples of affected exercises:

Shoulder Press
Upright Row
Lateral Raise

Example preventative / corrective exercises:

Front Lateral Raise

Instructions

Preparation
Grasp dumbbells in front of thighs. Bend over at hips slightly with knees bent
Execution

With elbow slightly bent, raise upper arms to sides, slightly to the front (30 to 45) until shoulder height.
Maintain elbows height above or equal to wrists. Lower and repeat.
Continue with opposite arm. Maintain fixed elbow position (10 to 30 angle) throughout exercise.


Lyeing Lateral Raise

Instructions

Preparation
Lie on side with legs separated for support. Grasp dumbbell in front of thigh.
Execution

Raise dumbbell from the floor until arm is vertical.
Maintain fixed elbow position (10 to 30 angle) throughout exercise.
Lower and repeat.




[/indent]
Infraspinatus
The infraspinatus is the second most often injured rotator cuff muscle. It is assisted by the Teres Minor.
The Infraspinatus' weaknesses:
Increased risk of shoulder injury when elbow travels behind shoulder, during the end of a throwing movement. High deceleration forces required of the posterior cuff can cause breakdown in their tendons near their humeral attachment. Strengthening of the rear deltoid and long head of the triceps brachii can also help stabilize shoulder, although to a lesser extent as compared the infraspinatus. External rotation-muscular endurance / internal rotation-muscular endurance should be greater than 70%.

Examples of affected exercises with suggestions for high risk individuals:

Bench Press
Chest Press
Range of motion may need to be limited so elbows do not go behind shoulders

Example preventative / corrective exercises:

Lying External Rotation

Instruction

Preparation
Lie on side with legs separated for support. Grasp dumbbell and position elbow against side and forearm across belly.
Execution

The athlete lies on their side.
With a light dumbbell, rotate the shoulder with the elbow bent as shown to lift the bumble.
Lower the weight down again to the start position.
Aim for 10 to 20 repetitions.
This exercise may be performed daily.
Maintain elbow against side and fixed elbow position (90 angle) throughout exercise.

Illustration:
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/gallery/shoulder/external_rotation_lying.jpg

Rows

Instruction

Preparation
Lie chest on inclined platform and grasp lever handles with an overhand grip.
Execution

Pull lever up as high as possible.
Return until arms are extended and shoulders are stretched forward.
Repeat.



[/indent]
Subscapularis (Sorry, I can't get many infos, but here ya go !)


To train Subscapularis:

Medial Rotation (Internal Rotation)

Rotary movement around the longitudinal axis of the bone toward the center of the body; turning the upper arm inward.


Next, all of these exercises below train your Suprasinatus, Infraspinatus, and Subscapularis in order to strengthen them and prevent injuries (some have been mentioned above, but still included again). These exercises have been used also in rehabilitations of shoulder injuries:

How to exercises:

Abduction in internal rotation

The athlete lifts a light weight out to the side with a straight arm (abducts the arm).
Note the shoulder is internally rotated so the thumb of the hand points down towards the floor.
It may be enough for the athlete to do this exercise without a weight or with just a very light weight such as a can of beans!
Illustration:
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/gallery/shoulder/abduction_internal.jpg

Abduction in external rotation

This exercise is the same as the one above except the thumb is pointing upwards.
Aim for 3 sets of 10 repetitions and build up to 3 sets of 30 repetitions.
Build up very gradually and asses the response the following day as well as afterwards.
If the athlete manages 30 reps then the weight can be increased.
Illustration:
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/gallery/shoulder/abduction_external.jpg

External rotation lying

The athlete lies on their side.
With a light dumbbell, rotate the shoulder with the elbow bent as shown to lift the bumble.
Lower the weight down again to the start position.
Aim for 10 to 20 repetitions.
This exercise may be performed daily.
Illustration:
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/gallery/shoulder/external_rotation_lying.jpg

External rotation sitting

This is the reverse of the above.
Lying on back with the arm bent and raised out to the side (abducted) at 90 degrees.
Rotate the shoulder back so the palm of the hand faces upwards.
Hold the position for between 2 and 3 minutes.
Illustration:
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/gallery/shoulder/external_rotation_sitting.jpg

Overhead at 135 degrees:

Lying on back with the arm straight and raised above the head but not directly upwards / overhead.
With palm facing upwards, relax the shoulder an let it hang down towards the floor. Feel the stretch in the front of the shoulder.
Again, hold the position for between 2 and 3 minutes.
Illustration:
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/gallery/shoulder/horizontal_abduction.jpg

Biceps curl

This exercise is designed to strengthen the 'long head' of the biceps.
A normal biceps curls is performed, but with the shoulder in extension - moved backwards.
This is achieved by performing a biceps curl whilst lying on the back with the elbow dropped towards the floor over the side of the bench.
It is important to stretch the muscles both before and after a strengthening session.
Illustration:
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/gallery/shoulder/bicep_curl_extension.jpg

Transverse Abduction

Lateral movement away from the midline of the body in a horizontal plane; moving the upper arm away from the chest with the elbows facing down.

Medial Rotation (Internal Rotation)

Rotary movement around the longitudinal axis of the bone toward the center of the body; turning the upper arm inward.

Abduction

Lateral movement away from the midline of the body; moving the upper arm up to the side away from the body.

tazzmaniac
04-09-2005, 01:03 AM
Men's fitness :/

We'll talk again when you do dips and your humerus slips out of the joint.
Do a concious effort to warm up every muscle and every joint that moves before attempting doing some heavy weights.
Do adobe's proposed exercises for your own good! These muscles are capable of hypertrophy (to some extent), but it is strength we must seek. Pick up 2 1kg dumbells, do some of those exercises and see how much sweat you break. I started a week ago and I am sure results are not too far away.
For all you jokers, who have nothing better to do than mock, go and ask a weightlifter what he thinks of these exercises. How on earth do you think he snatches the barbell and rotates his humerus from pointing downwards to pointing upwards? Why don't they suffer from dislocations even if they move more weight than you mockers can't even budge?
Don't waste our time with cheap jokes and arogance!

Uriel_da_man
04-09-2005, 01:14 AM
It was my impression that a lot of RC injuries are not due to weak rotator cuffs per se, rather imbalance between external rotators and internal rotators. Eg too much benching resulting in weak external rotators comparatively.
That + r/c not strong/endurant enough (endurance is more important than strength on the r/c) + lack of flexibility.

IMHO, people take the injury thing way too far. Yes, the rotator cuff is important, but you don't need to be obcessed with it. The "safe way" of doing many exercises (limiting the ROM) will prove less efficient for building muscle, a lot less efficient for building practical strength and will probably start restricting your flexibility even further.

Uriel_da_man
04-09-2005, 01:15 AM
We'll talk again when you do dips and your humerus slips out of the joint.
Dude, that's AJ you're talking to, he's the anti-injury man!

Uriel_da_man
04-09-2005, 01:22 AM
Oh and that's a nice post Adobe, but some stuff is wrong. I didn't read it all but I already found this:


It's easy to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles, if you can remember to work them, that is. Since these so-called "precision" muscles (which precisely center the humeral head) are invisible from the outside, they're easy to overlook. Big mistake.
Infraspinatus and teres minor are WELL visible on your back when developed.


Biceps curl

* This exercise is designed to strengthen the 'long head' of the biceps.
The way the exercise is represented, it's for the short head of the biceps, not the long.

The illustration of the front lateral raise is a very bad one btw. You supposedly get shoulder impingement from adducting the arm when internaly rotated, that's the injury the front lateral raise is supposed to correct/prevent, but doing it with the arm internaly rotated you're only making things worse.

...

tazzmaniac
04-09-2005, 01:36 AM
If AJ is the anti - injury then why the ironic post?

DavetheDog
04-09-2005, 03:10 AM
I'm still surprised about how much internal rotation is recommended. If the shoulder is balanced and simply weak, then fair enough. But I don't expect that's really the case with most injuries.

corple
04-09-2005, 07:23 AM
for anybody who has never seen this, I URGE YOU TO DO THIS! even if you dont have shoulder problems.

http://www.intens************/showthread.php?t=6997&page=1&pp=25

it works.

RYU23
04-09-2005, 07:37 AM
for anybody who has never seen this, I URGE YOU TO DO THIS! even if you dont have shoulder problems.

http://www.intens************/showthread.php?t=6997&page=1&pp=25

it works.
lol I have the link the the thread with that post in my sig! And I think this is a good thread by the way, so good post Adobe!

adobe
04-09-2005, 09:29 AM
Oh and that's a nice post Adobe, but some stuff is wrong. I didn't read it all but I already found this:


Infraspinatus and teres minor are WELL visible on your back when developed.


The way the exercise is represented, it's for the short head of the biceps, not the long.

The illustration of the front lateral raise is a very bad one btw. You supposedly get shoulder impingement from adducting the arm when internaly rotated, that's the injury the front lateral raise is supposed to correct/prevent, but doing it with the arm internaly rotated you're only making things worse.

...

You my friend....what can I say....thanks for participating and willing to share the info with us here ! My post are based on some articles which I found on the net 2 weeks ago, and I know that not all the info are correct, my bad ! If you found mistakes, you can posts the right one ! (That's what a forum is for, right ?) I would appreciate you and .... reps shall be given....

I have a friend of mine who had injuries because of bench pressing, and he had to stop his workout for about a month or so, and then he went to a doctor and the doctor told him about the exercises given above in my posts which I got them for free......and I'm sharing those with you all !

But still...experiences tell better....more people response and are willing to share, the better we all be ! So, keep it coming people, because EXPERIENCES TELL BETTER ! We won't have to be injured while we can all prevent it ! (I hope so...)

Thanks for all the people who have taken this thread seriously and participated ! Reps shall be comin' soon, after I recharged !

Furious E
04-09-2005, 09:56 AM
It was my impression that a lot of RC injuries are not due to weak rotator cuffs per se, rather imbalance between external rotators and internal rotators. Eg too much benching resulting in weak external rotators comparatively.

The article would be much better if it detailed cable rows, lat pulls and external rotations that would help even things up.

i agree with this

it was a good read, but theres so many good exercises that leave the shoulders vulnerable, instead its better to focus on protecting your shoulders with a strong upper back and rear delts

tazzmaniac
04-09-2005, 12:25 PM
Check out this link on exercises:
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459577
It is an entire recommended workout! This is what I was talking about in my first post.

I feel I need to repeat myself: use extremely low weights. 4lb dumbells drained the life out of me!

And do yourselves a favour: Even if you aren't a convinced fan of strict execution, take the time to learn the correct form and do them slowly. If you know how your delts feel when put to work, then make sure it is NOT the delts you feel in these exercises.

BernieD
04-09-2005, 06:18 PM
for anybody who has never seen this, I URGE YOU TO DO THIS! even if you dont have shoulder problems.

http://www.intens************/showthread.php?t=6997&page=1&pp=25

it works.

corple...you are a God among men...I've been having a lot of shoulder problems lately. I just did this JUST ONCE just now and I already feel better...wow

AussieLB
07-29-2005, 11:14 AM
Thanks for that man and going to the effort! I have had a great deal of shoulder pain that I am getting over and found your post helpfull. I tried some of those exercises and I can really feel a difference.

On a side note - I also noticed great improvements in my shoulder by locking my shoulders in place when starting/performing exercises (bench/lat pulldown etc). I just concentrate and imagine pointing each shoulder blade to the opposite hip (or just pushing the blades together) throughout the entire motion and it really helps.

Once again - thanks...

_ADV
07-12-2011, 12:21 PM
excellent advice something everyone should read

Katyemma
07-22-2012, 01:56 PM
Hi, I've just joined on here for some help and advice, Ive read some of the posts above which are great.
Ive been military pressing 16k DBs until 5 weeks ago when I partially dislocated my shoulder at the top point of the press, I've had some physio and continued stretching and workouts going back 2 week ago with 10k DBs, I do lots of kettle bell workouts too, and although it didn't feel totally back to normal I haven't been feeling like it was going to pop back out, in actual fact it kind of feels like it never quite went back in right, like it needs to click black into place, so today on my 3rd set of over head presses with the smaller 10k same shoulder did it again, it went straight back in but I am really worried I'm not going to be able to lift decent weights again. It's sore and still doesn't feel completely right but I'm running out of money for physio and wondered if anyone can give me some advice. How long does this type of injury take to mend and will I be able to get back to heavier weights at some point?

Leesyann
08-13-2012, 07:28 AM
I recently injured r/c while bench pressing, now I know why. I've still been exercising, I'm pretty sure I've been doing too much. Any exercises I can do to hit the upper body that will keep my shoulder at rest? Any exercises for lower abs would help too. Thanks for the great article.

RajTheRiser
06-06-2016, 02:56 AM
Very detailed and valuable information. Thank you very much for sharing this information.Really appreciate it.

Katzz9
01-25-2018, 07:19 AM
well thanks I was doing at least three of those in an awkward position. I will put this into practice. I had a bad fall and tore the supraspinatus tendon and I'm having a hard time with the recovery. I've avoided doing anything with shoulders but as soon as possible I will be putting these into practice. Prior to my fall I had no pain in my shoulders But I can see the benefit of applying this so that I can strengthen though even more.