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View Full Version : Is Overtraining over Hyped these days?



shadowmoses
02-26-2005, 08:19 AM
I have started this thread as i would like the verdict on whether or not too much emphasis is put on overtraining in this day?

Check out this article for a sample of what i mean:

http://www.intense-workout.com/overtraining.html

I would like you guys verdict on this as to be honest i have seen my best results come when training very hard 5 or 6 days a week.

PeaCE

Original Poster
02-26-2005, 09:38 AM
What is overtraining or not is different for everyone.
One size fits all does not even work for rest.

Age, genetics and your individual CNS really determine it all IMO.

IMO way to many people undertrain as well as alot overtrain.

But most of all, I feel gains or losses are limited usually by not putting together the whole program. Training, rest, and nutrition.

A.FreeRadical
02-26-2005, 09:49 AM
Check out this article for a sample of what i mean:

http://www.intense-workout.com/overtraining.html

I would like you guys verdict on this as to be honest i have seen my best results come when training very hard 5 or 6 days a week.

PeaCE

I agree with the author of that article. I can lift 5 days per week for 60 minutes per session (one of 5 muscle groups each session). My training cycles are 4-8 weeks long with 1 week of rest between cycles. If I do more than that, I get little benefit, or worse, I will get sick.

I thought the author was general enough in how he defined over-training, as well he should. Overtraining is pretty much an individual thing.


...working out 7 times a week, for 2-3 hours each time, doing 5 exercises per muscle and doing each muscle 4 times a week will do just as much for you as sitting home and eating potato chips all day.

His example is obviously over-training by anyone's definition.

*
A.FreeRadical

Defiant1
02-26-2005, 10:00 AM
I have started this thread as i would like the verdict on whether or not too much emphasis is put on overtraining in this day?

Check out this article for a sample of what i mean:

http://www.intense-workout.com/overtraining.html

I would like you guys verdict on this as to be honest i have seen my best results come when training very hard 5 or 6 days a week.

PeaCE


You are correct. There is WAY TOO MUCH HYPE about "overtraining". It is like a disease.

Like ANYTHING in life, results take effort.

Everyone wants it easy and with as little effort as possible. These "overtraining" gurus prey on this.

They are no better than the diet guys on tv who say it's easy, or the money making guys who say the same thing.

stahlhart
02-26-2005, 10:14 AM
You're overlooking one thing, though: someone who trains far too much too soon -- especially someone who is starting out from scratch, attempting to keep a "New Year's resolution" or whatever -- is more likely to burn out on their fitness regimen and give up than someone who paces themself, sets realistic goals, and isn't too impatient about reaching them -- someone who sees it for what it ought to be, which is a change in lifestyle, rather than a short term fix for a long term problem.

Perhaps if you look at it purely in terms of exercise physiology, then sure, overtraining could be seen as a myth, but intense workouts 5 or 6 days per week aren't necessarily for everyone, either -- and neither should you negatively judge someone who doesn't choose to spend as much time in the gym as you do. Folks have other obligations in life: work, family, raising children, spending time with friends, etc., and everyone achieves their own ends in balancing all of this as they see fit for themselves individually.

C.K.

Defiant1
02-26-2005, 11:18 AM
You're overlooking one thing, though: someone who trains far too much too soon -- especially someone who is starting out from scratch, attempting to keep a "New Year's resolution" or whatever -- is more likely to burn out on their fitness regimen and give up than someone who paces themself, sets realistic goals, and isn't too impatient about reaching them -- someone who sees it for what it ought to be, which is a change in lifestyle, rather than a short term fix for a long term problem.

Perhaps if you look at it purely in terms of exercise physiology, then sure, overtraining could be seen as a myth, but intense workouts 5 or 6 days per week aren't necessarily for everyone, either -- and neither should you negatively judge someone who doesn't choose to spend as much time in the gym as you do. Folks have other obligations in life: work, family, raising children, spending time with friends, etc., and everyone achieves their own ends in balancing all of this as they see fit for themselves individually.

C.K.

I agree with you 100%.

My complaint, and you were around for this also, is that people are saying beginners should a. train each bodypart 1x per week and b. cry overtraining when it gets tough. I and I'm sure you remember the 20 sets per bodypart days. At my gym (gyms) we all did it, it worked, and despite what others say, we weren't genetic freaks (try college students) and on steroids.

I'm assuming when talking about "overtraining" that we are talking about going for MAXIMUM results. The other people are doing more than they want basically.

Overload
02-26-2005, 12:04 PM
It definitely is an individual thing. There are so many factors that through experimentation is how we find what we can handle or not. Besides training frequency and volume... age, lifestyle, work and family stresses, diet, rest, etc, have to be considered. For me, I would burn out quickly on a 4+ day routine.

My recovery abilities suck and I know this because of other outside factors, many time beyond my control, and I've been down that road many times where I try to do too much and just end up getting sick, I plateau quickly and lose interest. My intensity is quite high for me IMO, so I need less. If I was to use the same intensity with more frequency, I would burn out fast.

But that's me. To each his own. Personally I do feel many here do too much. Mainly the youngsters. For example, is there really a need to do 15-20 sets for biceps :rolleyes: But again, that's me and just my opinion.

OHIOSTEVE
02-26-2005, 07:42 PM
For me personally I went to training each muscle group 2 times a week for about 6 weeks..saw more gains muscle wise than ever before...was told I was gonna over train by a buddy who seemed knowledgable so I dropped to one time per week per muscle group..results slowed down....started listening to fitty and you guys on here and seeing some gains again..can't help but wonder how my body would respond to eating as you guys suggest and lifting like I used to?
MONDAY=CHEST AND TRIS
TUESDAY=BACK AND BIS
WEDNESDAY=LEGS AND SHOULDERS
THURSDAY = OFF
FRIDAY=CHEST AND TRIS
SAT=BACK AND BIS
SUNDAY=LEGS AND SHOULDERS
Ab work thrown in a couple times a week where I felt like it and cardio for 20 minutes after each session lifting.
According to everything I have ever read that would be WAY overtraining but I made better gains this way than with anything else, and my diet SUCKED at the time( way low on fats and cals) I seem to recover FAST except for my legs. ANYWAY just thinking out loud.

CdnArctic
02-26-2005, 07:52 PM
Awesome topic! I wondered about this myself, I mean there are 15 year olds on this site going on about how they over trained their shoulders because the gains they want arent coming fast enough. 15! My God what healthy 15 year old should be worried about overtraining? (That one gifted freak of competitive bodybuilding out of 5000 is the exception) I can just hear it now..sorry Dad/Wife I cant mow the lawn because I dont want to overtrain after working out.

I suspect there is a lot of 'terminology' dropping around here and to this issue I think for the large majority of us, again the truly competitive not included, I this is'nt too much of a worry point - adequate nutrition and rest ie proper sleep are probably the major culprits affecting how one feels and their results.

Hibiscus09
02-26-2005, 07:53 PM
I think sometimes less is more.



MONDAY=CHEST AND TRIS
TUESDAY=BACK AND BIS
WEDNESDAY=LEGS AND SHOULDERS
THURSDAY = OFF
FRIDAY=CHEST AND TRIS
SAT=BACK AND BIS
SUNDAY=LEGS AND SHOULDERS


I would definitely get overtrained and injured doing that. I lift 4 days a week and that's about all I can handle with the intensity I put into my training. I also like a week off about every 8 weeks.

I do think it's an individual thing and you should do what works for your body.

Mark1T
02-26-2005, 07:57 PM
For me, as an individual, I believe I was over-training per each workout - not per each week.

I experimented and cut the amount of sets per each body part, but upped the reps, and increased the intensity each workout. I have forced my body to get stronger, bigger and gain muscle weight.

As a result, but taking at least one month to see results, I see a difference in my body shape, strength and endurance. Last secret has been increasing protein intake.

It is an individual thing.

Mark1T
02-26-2005, 07:59 PM
It definitely is an individual thing. There are so many factors that through experimentation is how we find what we can handle or not. Besides training frequency and volume... age, lifestyle, work and family stresses, diet, rest, etc, have to be considered. For me, I would burn out quickly on a 4+ day routine.

My recovery abilities suck and I know this because of other outside factors, many time beyond my control, and I've been down that road many times where I try to do too much and just end up getting sick, I plateau quickly and lose interest. My intensity is quite high for me IMO, so I need less. If I was to use the same intensity with more frequency, I would burn out fast.

But that's me. To each his own. Personally I do feel many here do too much. Mainly the youngsters. For example, is there really a need to do 15-20 sets for biceps :rolleyes: But again, that's me and just my opinion.

Right on. Good post.

Niroc
02-26-2005, 08:31 PM
Everyone made some very valid points and I can agree with all of it. My old routine was a traditional 4day split 4 on 1 off repeat but in the last 3-4 months I started adding an extra rest day between days 2 and 3. Just this one extra day allowed me to recover that much more and I have been able to continue to make size/strength gains regularly. Prior to this I was stalling on my increases. I believe this topic is mainly a per person thing. You need to experiment to find your limitations and find how to emphasize your strengths. I also believe that most of the BB'ing game boils down to good nutrion and adequate rest. It's a harmony when all things are in place and in the right proportions the gains will abound steadily. Just takes some time and patience to find out what works the best for you.

Most Muscular
02-26-2005, 08:44 PM
More isn't better. Better is better.

GREENFEATHER
02-26-2005, 09:02 PM
More isn't better. Better is better.


Since I started MAX-OT, my gains have been coming by leaps and bounds which tels me I was over training quite a bit. We work out 5 days a week and I feel like it isn't over training to split like we do. If I tried to do more than 1 bodypart a day I couldn't do as good of a job on that part. Do what works for you and if it hasn't started working in a month to 6 weeks, it's time to change IMO.

Most Muscular
02-26-2005, 10:12 PM
Since I started MAX-OT, my gains have been coming by leaps and bounds which tels me I was over training quite a bit. We work out 5 days a week and I feel like it isn't over training to split like we do. If I tried to do more than 1 bodypart a day I couldn't do as good of a job on that part. Do what works for you and if it hasn't started working in a month to 6 weeks, it's time to change IMO.

Like yourself, since I have used the Max-OT lifting philosphy I too have realized that I tended to overtrain in the past. People starting out with Max-OT have a hard time adjusting to the decreased workout lengths and fewer sets, but become huge believers when they start seeing the results it can produce.

shadowmoses
02-27-2005, 01:05 PM
Thanks guys loadsa good replies and perspectives on overtraining...


PeaCE

Dia-Tribe
03-01-2005, 05:38 PM
Do what works for you and if it hasn't started working in a month to 6 weeks, it's time to change IMO.

IMO too...

The author in the article does present reasonable general guidlines which I think most would agree with.

Thanks for posting the article shadowmoses.