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NaveedK
02-15-2005, 03:49 AM
Hi.

IN the nutrition sticky, alan says that most people dont know that most brown rice are high GI. IS that really true?

I will be consuming 125g brown rice, 250g chicken breast, 2 cups mixed veggies. Even if the brown rice are high GI, will the chicken and veggies lower the GI?

Rippd
02-15-2005, 04:16 AM
Yes, the chicken & veggies will certainly lower the gi. You don't need to be concerned with gi so much with mixed meals.

Sixpack
02-15-2005, 04:56 AM
I use Hulled barley or pearled barley much lower GI then rice and better tasting IMO. Good stuff

sawastea
02-15-2005, 06:05 AM
It is a bit more complicated then that. Brown rice, in general, has a medium GI/GL, though, that depends on the type of grain used (short vs long). Here is the glycemic index (http://diabetes.about.com/library/mendosagi/ngilists.htm). The important factor is the ratio of amylose to amylopectin. Low amylose rice has the highest GI, while a high amylose rice like basmati, has a lower GI. Short grain has the lowest amylose and long grain has the highest.

porkpie
02-15-2005, 06:10 AM
It is a bit more complicated then that. Brown rice, in general, has a medium GI/GL, though, that depends on the type of grain used (short vs long). Here is the glycemic index (http://diabetes.about.com/library/mendosagi/ngilists.htm). The important factor is the ratio of amylose to amylopectin. Low amylose rice has the highest GI, while a high amylose rice like basmati, has a lower GI. Short grain has the lowest amylose and long grain has the highest.

I did not know that, thanks for the info!

Kurz
02-15-2005, 06:49 AM
I did not know that, thanks for the info!
Stick with brown rice and you are good to go..........

Max Protein
02-15-2005, 07:32 AM
It is a bit more complicated then that. Brown rice, in general, has a medium GI/GL, though, that depends on the type of grain used (short vs long). Here is the glycemic index (http://diabetes.about.com/library/mendosagi/ngilists.htm). The important factor is the ratio of amylose to amylopectin. Low amylose rice has the highest GI, while a high amylose rice like basmati, has a lower GI. Short grain has the lowest amylose and long grain has the highest.

That's a relief, I buy long grain brown rice. The reason it's fairly low GI is due to the insoluble fibre.

Dia-Tribe
02-15-2005, 07:08 PM
if you want a lower GI rice you might want to take a look at Basmati Rice-

http://www.diabetes.org.uk/eatwell/meal_planning/gi.htm
-------------------------------------------------------
Typical GI ratings for common foods

Low (up to 55)
Apples, oranges, pears, peaches
Beans and lentils
Pasta (all types made from durum wheat)
Barley
Porridge
Custard

Medium (between 55 and 70)
Basmati rice
Honey
Jam
Weetabix
Ice cream
New potatoes

High (above 70)
Glucose
White and wholemeal bread
Brown rice
Cornflakes
Baked potato
Mashed potato
-------------------------

Hope this helps

Rippd
02-15-2005, 07:27 PM
GI is irrelevant with mixed meals.

the number that you see on the GI chart is different once you add protein and/or fats.

Dia-Tribe
02-15-2005, 07:49 PM
Hi Rippd
Spot on with your answer.

The link under "How to apply GI"
http://www.diabetes.org.uk/eatwell/meal_planning/gi.htm
explains what you are refering to in greater depth.

Worth a read for those fussing over the latest GI thing.

I'm diabetic so I need to keep a closer eye on smaller variances.

Cheers

alan aragon
02-15-2005, 09:35 PM
if i could edit my post, i'd say that the average GI of 9 different types of brown rice listed on mendosa's site is 66, which rates just shy of high (high is 70 or above). so technically, it averages at high-moderate.

i recommend that you read rippd's siggy for a different perspective on GI, as well as diatribe's link.

A.FreeRadical
02-15-2005, 11:39 PM
I add beans (and other vegetables, meats and spices) to my basmati brown rice to make a complete meal. This way it is low gi and complete protein. Tastes a lot better too.

*
aA.FreeRadical a
Visit my 8 week cutting journal. http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=382697

Max Protein
02-16-2005, 07:05 AM
I add beans (and other vegetables, meats and spices) to my basmati brown rice to make a complete meal. This way it is low gi and complete protein. Tastes a lot better too.

This is similar to what I do. I just make a stir-fry with sweet peppers, mushroom and onion with some chunks of chicken or steak chopped into small pieces in the same pan. Then add to the brown rice, and it's a perfect pre-workout meal. Very satisfying as well.

BigBoogie
02-16-2005, 07:18 AM
GI is irrelevant with mixed meals.

the number that you see on the GI chart is different once you add protein and/or fats.
I agree with you totally but I wouldnt use the word irrelevant.

subby
02-16-2005, 07:43 AM
basmati rice is low GI, and in my opinion...the best tasting....give it a go :)

Max Protein
02-17-2005, 06:19 AM
basmati rice is low GI, and in my opinion...the best tasting....give it a go :)

I'll agree it is nice, but don't completely substitute brown rice for it, as brown rice contains extra nutrients such as insoluble fibre.

sawastea
02-17-2005, 06:39 AM
I'll agree it is nice, but don't completely substitute brown rice for it, as brown rice contains extra nutrients such as insoluble fibre.

Basmati is a type of brown rice :D

A.FreeRadical
02-17-2005, 06:48 AM
I'll agree it is nice, but don't completely substitute brown rice for it, as brown rice contains extra nutrients such as insoluble fibre.

Mine is labeled Brown Basmati.

*
aA.FreeRadical a
Visit my 8 week cutting journal. http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=382697

Jules Verne
02-17-2005, 08:01 AM
if i could edit my post, i'd say that the average GI of 9 different types of brown rice listed on mendosa's site is 66, which rates just shy of high (high is 70 or above). so technically, it averages at high-moderate.

i recommend that you read rippd's siggy for a different perspective on GI, as well as diatribe's link.

In my opinion that is quite misleading since the variance is so high. Also the highest GI brown rices look like they have been 'processed'

By this reasoning I could argue that brown rice is higher GI than white since the average for long grain is 60, with the two highest being parboiled. Take those out and you get 57. Not exactly high!

Looking at the GI lists it is clear rice can be quite low or very high, brown or white, but sticking with long grain or bastmati are probably your best bets for getting something low-moderate GI.

Also, as with potaoes, since you probably shouldnt be eating a lot of carbs at one meal (except where you might want higher GI), it shouldn't bee too much of a concern if you meal is mostly meat and veg with a bit or rice.

Although GI can easily be blown out of proportion, saying it is 'irrelevant' is just as extreme and never eating a potato and not particularly helpful - although it may get people to think about it a bit more - which is always good!

Max Protein
02-18-2005, 06:33 AM
Basmati is a type of brown rice :D

You can get white basmati y'know... :cool: