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MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:26 AM
I have had an addiction or two over the years and I receive these inspirational thoughts in my e-mail that have helped my day start on a positive note.

Unfortunately I've been neglecting some area's lately and thought that if I posted these in here daily they would again help me and perhaps others with a positive outlook.

These thoughts cover a variety of areas and may or may not apply but I'm posting them. :)

They are all from "Todays Gift" at Hazelden.

Again this is for my benefit and and if someone here is inspired....great.

If you don't like something then neg me but please no nasty comments.

Thank You All. :)

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:28 AM
You're never too old to grow up.
--Shirley Conran

A child's view of adults is that they have arrived at some fixed point where they are emancipated and have all the tools necessary for life. An adult knows that we never stop growing. Many of us have been stuck in an immature level of development. Our life stresses and our addictions took us off the track of emotional growth. We found substitutes and evasions for truly dealing with the normal life problems. Now we are back on the much more rewarding path of truly living and growing.

We accept the adult wisdom that we all need help and we all continue to learn and grow throughout our life span. We finally feel like adults because we take responsibility for our actions. We don't blame others for our problems, and when our days feel challenging, we can ask for help. Back on our path, we are never alone.

Today I am grateful to be on the path of dealing with my life and continuing to grow truly stronger.

SumthinOrNuthin
07-28-2007, 06:31 AM
That's excellent :)

I'd be very happy to read your daily thoughts :)

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:36 AM
That's excellent :)

I'd be very happy to read your daily thoughts :)

Ha ha they aren't mine but they are a good read for some.
I'm posting 7 this morning then a new one each day. :)

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:38 AM
The love, the acceptance of other persons makes me into the unique person I am meant to be.
--Peter G. van Breemen, S.J.

Our destinies are fulfilled through our loving involvement with the men, women, and children sharing our experiences. It is not by accident but by design that we've been drawn together to share goals, the workplace, or a home. We contribute to each other's search for understanding, and the spiritual quest that's at our center finds its resting place in one another's hearts.

The letter, the smile, or phone call we offer a fellow traveler today will bless our own faltering steps throughout the long hours ahead. Each time we focus our attention on the struggle or joy of someone else, our personal well being is enhanced. If we give away our love, we'll doubt less that we, too, are loved.

You are reading from the book:
Worthy of Love by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:41 AM
Lying to ourselves is more deeply ingrained than lying to others.
--Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The primary requirement for our recovery is honesty. In order to grow in honesty we first needed to see how we had lied to others and to ourselves. This was not as easy as it first appeared. Our lies to ourselves kept us so fully in the dark that we did not know we were lying. We sometimes told "sincere" lies because we honestly did not distinguish the truth within ourselves. For so long we had preferred dishonest rationalizations, and we had come to believe them.

The spiritual life of this program is based upon experience. What we feel, what we see and hear, is what we know. When we simplify our lives and base the truth upon our experiences, we slowly cleanse ourselves of the lies we told ourselves. With this kind of honesty comes an inner peace with ourselves in which we can say, "I know myself."

Today, I will accept my experience as a simple message of truth.

You are reading from the book:
Touchstones by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:43 AM
To speak ill of others is a dishonest way of praising ourselves.
--Will Durant

Sometimes we say bad things about others. When we do this, it makes us look bad too Our friends worry what we might say about them behind their backs. They're afraid to trust us. We become known as gossips.

The things we say about other people tell a lot about us. We are kind or unkind. We gossip or we don't. This doesn't mean we have to say everyone is wonderful all the time. As we work our program to see ourselves better, we begin to see other people more clearly too. We see their strong points and their weak points. But we can know these things without gossiping about them.

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:44 AM
A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone.
-- D. Thoreau

Conscious, careful selection of those activities, situations, or people to whom we'll devote attention is all that separates centered, serene people from harried men and women. All of us are bombarded by myriad requests for some form of personal involvement. The temptation is great to attend to first one thing and then another, passively and superficially. However, our lives are enriched only when we commit ourselves to a deeper level of involvement, and to the few, rather than the many.

The talent given each of us shines forth if it's been nurtured, coddled, encouraged. We must become immersed enough in a project or an experience to lose self-conscious reservations if we're to discover the real weight of our talent. We know ourselves fully only when we're able to let the talent within define the posture without.

You are reading from the book:
The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey and Martha Vanceburg

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:47 AM
At some point in our recovery, we need to admit to ourselves and others who we really are. Looking inside and pondering our shortcomings is not the most comfortable thing the program has asked us to do. In the past it's been more comfortable to deny them, to look the other way, to sweep the human error element under the rug.

But the rewards are great. Once we own our shortcomings, once we tell them out loud to another person, we have taken full responsibility for ourselves - who we are, what we are - and how we have acted.

Now we are closer to our Higher Power, who has accepted us all along. Now we can return to the spiritual support that is always available. When we admit who we are to ourselves and others, we are given the gift of self-acceptance and a sense of belonging to the human race.

By opening ourselves this way, we enrich our relationships with our Higher Power, ourselves, and our fellow humans. These relationships bring a new sense of belonging and meaning to our lives.

Today help me tell myself, my Higher Power, and at least one other person who I really am.

You are reading from the book:
Body, Mind, and Spirit by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
07-28-2007, 06:50 AM
In Micronesian, there's a word, kukaro, which has no corresponding word in English. When people say they are going to kukaro, they mean they are going to relax, sit around, and hang out. They are being, not doing.
--Eli and Beth Halpern

As children, our best times are often trips to an amusement park, fishing at the lake, camping, or just sitting idly under a tree. These make the best memories, and times sitting around a campfire roasting marshmallows or having a root beer after a family outing seem to bring out the love we share.

We don't seem to be accomplishing anything at these times. No chores are getting done around the house, no schoolwork, no repairs, and no moneymaking.

But these times of peace, relaxation, and a sense of endless time of being, not doing, may be essential to our ability to get other things done later. Certainly we are most receptive to our feelings, new ideas, and unplanned adventures at these moments. Maybe we should add kukaro to our vocabulary.

What timeless thing can I do today?

You are reading from the book:
Today's Gift by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
07-29-2007, 03:39 AM
I feel good about myself since I started taking care of my body. It's the home that goes with me each day of my life.
--Bill L. - Age 17

When we were using, we often neglected our bodies and personal hygiene. We may have also stopped getting regular medical and dental care. It seemed that the ups and downs of a user's life left us with little energy for personal care.

Today we are surprised at how much joy we get out of smelling good and dressing with care. Many of us are developing our own personal style.

At first, we might need to force ourselves to call for regular checkups, but the feeling of wellness we get from being responsible for our bodies outweighs our old fears.

Today let me love myself enough to care about my physical health and appearance.

You are reading from the book:
Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast


Note:

Many of us may have been in this boat or currently have young people fighting addiction of some sort. :o

JOHN GARGANI
07-29-2007, 05:03 AM
I have had a lot of contact with Alcoholism and alcoholics throughout my life, although, thankfully, drinking was never a problem for myself.....


like all addictions, they seem to ensnare good people.....


you seem to be another one of those.....make each day count bro!

MacGyverDel
07-30-2007, 03:26 AM
There is no total answer.

Studying and reading are traditional methods of spiritual growth. With a lifelong routine of study each day, a person or couple grows under the guidance of the sages. Civilization exists because each generation builds upon the progress of the past. We do not have to reinvent the wheel.

After we learn from those who have gone before, we may even discover and create beyond the point where they left off. But if we are in a willful, defiant mood, we may say, "I have to find my own way. I don't feel like learning from anyone." Our individualism then becomes a half-truth, silently trapping us in problems that others have found answers to.

There is no total answer - no total freedom - only continued growth. Daily reading, openness to learn from others' encounters with life, and study of how they faced their most challenging spiritual questions will bring us progress.

You are reading from the book:
The More We Find In Each Other by Merle Fossum and Mavis Fossum

MacGyverDel
07-31-2007, 02:55 AM
Without discipline, there's no life at all.
--Katharine Hepburn

We all have deadlines we must meet. We have bills to pay, responsibilities at work, children with school projects - all the innumerable small markers that push life forward.

When we realize we're procrastinating, we need to be committed to not shaming ourselves. Procrastination is not an indication that we have failed. How realistic would it be if we looked forward to doing unpleasant things? It's human to avoid what we'd rather not do.

As we free ourselves from the burden of perfectionism, we're free to better accept our responsibilities. Meeting deadlines as well as we can, one at a time, pays off in serenity and a manageable life. When we are crisis ridden, we are forced to live by other peoples' demands, rather than by our choices. In the face of procrastination, resentment, or perfectionism, we can turn to Step Ten for an inventory. We can forgive ourselves, try to laugh at ourselves, live in the present, and keep going. Today can be better than yesterday.

I may as well admit it - there's probably something I'm avoiding. Is today the day to do it?

You are reading from the book:

Answers in the Heart by Anonymous


Ah! Perfectionism and procrastination. Two of my many issues in life. :rolleyes:
This is a good daily meditation book I got for my wife a few years ago. She enjoyed it for a bit. :)

Like It Or Not
07-31-2007, 07:38 AM
"Those who are bound by desire, see only that, which can be held in their hands."

--Leroy Green (from the movie-The Last Dragon)

Here's a link for some motivational quotes if anyone is interested.

http://www.motivationalquotes.com/

MacGyverDel
07-31-2007, 07:46 AM
Like It Or Not a good link. :D

Minotaur
07-31-2007, 07:52 AM
Lying to ourselves is more deeply ingrained than lying to others.
--Fyodor Dostoyevsky



Well ain't that the damn truth! :(

MacGyverDel
08-01-2007, 03:20 AM
When folks have allotted themselves a task and work together in unison, they escape unhappiness.
--Emile Zola

We may have been loners in the past, preferring solitude to the company of others. We may have spent time as children buried in books instead of outside playing with other children. We may have endured high school without lots of dates. We may now feel more comfortable with people in one on one situations rather than in large groups.

A meeting is an ideal place to learn how to interact with others. We don't have to act a certain way or hide our feelings because our group will understand us no matter what. We can give as much as we choose and they will neither harm us, nor ask for more.

By attending meetings regularly, we'll learn they exist because people are working together in unison. Someone "opens up," others make coffee, one will chair and one will speak, and some will clean up at the end. We can learn that the strength of our group lies in the ability of each member to do what is comfortable for him or her. Such coexistence can help us learn we can gather strength from numbers.

I can do something to add to the strength of the group.

You are reading from the book:
Night Light by Amy E. Dean

MacGyverDel
08-02-2007, 03:48 AM
You can't let adversity get you down. Keep smiling.
--Violet Hensley

Violet's smiles certainly fit this category. She lights up rooms with her joy and energy, her fiddle playing and storytelling. We don't all smile quite so easily. Why is that? Some naively assume one's easy; individual circumstances determine the willingness to smile. A few hours with a soul like Violet convinces us otherwise. The work we've done, the environment we inhabit, the struggles we've had or have been free of do not determine our happiness, thus the frequency of our smiles. That's good fortune, in fact.

Smiling is first an attitude and then an action. We don't have to be bubbling over with inner happiness to smile. On the contrary, if something is bothering us, we may discover it will not loom so large if we focus our energy on smiling at a friend or even a stranger. Some would label it miraculous how changed a problem seems when we decide to put our energy into smiling at the passersby in our lives.

The separation we feel from others is what often gives rise to our problems, regardless of their details. Giving a smile and getting one in return diminishes our sense of separation. Problems diminish, too.

How do I feel today? Even a few smiles will lift my spirits.

You are reading from the book:
Keepers of the Wisdom by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
08-03-2007, 03:50 AM
When am I manipulative?

Without understanding our motives, we can easily lapse into behavior aimed at manipulating others. Sulking is a means of letting others know we are displeased and forcing them to attempt to win our approval. Flattery is a false expression of approval that we don't really feel - giving others good strokes for our own purpose. Withholding deserved praise is a means of putting others down, something we're likely to do because of our jealousy.

Manipulative behavior is almost always selfish behavior. It is usually a false means of trying to get our own way. It is certainly an immature way of dealing with people and situations.

The best way to avoid being manipulative is to be ourselves at all times. We have neither the right nor the responsibility to control or regulate other people. Our best approach, in trying to influence another's actions, is simply to state our own case with sincerity and honesty. Others must be free to act, free to choose, and free to make their own decisions without manipulative interference on our part.

I will be myself at all times today. I will not assume false roles simply for the purpose of bending others to my own will. Manipulative behavior is controlling behavior, which I must avoid.

You are reading from the book:
Walk in Dry Places by Mel B.


Note:

This is definately one I still need plenty of work with. It's never easy being ourselves if we are uncomfortable in our own skin. And myself, well I've always had a facade up......fears of appearing too sensitive perhaps.
But being aware of these things allows me to sea a ways of bettering myself. :)

josefc
08-03-2007, 04:16 AM
To speak ill of others is a dishonest way of praising ourselves.
--Will Durant

Sometimes we say bad things about others. When we do this, it makes us look bad too Our friends worry what we might say about them behind their backs. They're afraid to trust us. We become known as gossips.

The things we say about other people tell a lot about us. We are kind or unkind. We gossip or we don't. This doesn't mean we have to say everyone is wonderful all the time. As we work our program to see ourselves better, we begin to see other people more clearly too. We see their strong points and their weak points. But we can know these things without gossiping about them.

I absolutely NEVER gossip, although a friend that DOES gossip on a regular basis insists it is NOT gossip but merely "information exchange" :D

I am not convinced and it is true, speak ill of others is just a way of bolstering ones own ego in most cases... it is most unattractive in my view to act in such a manner.

MacGyverDel
08-04-2007, 09:01 AM
(A little late this morn with a small internetz issue. But fine now. :))

Today's thought from Hazelden is:

... satisfaction is a lowly thing, how pure a thing is joy.
--Marianne Moore

Our perfectionism generally dashes all hopes of self-satisfaction. But the program is here to show us that we can make progress. We can learn to believe that we are doing any task as well as we need to do it, at this time. Our job is the effort. The outcome is part of a larger plan, one that involves more than ourselves.

We'll find joy when we find acceptance of ourselves and our efforts and the belief that we are spiritual beings whose lives do have purpose and direction.

The wisdom that accompanies spiritual growth offers us security, that which we have sought along many avenues. And when we feel secure, we can trust that the challenges confronting us are purposeful and to our advantage.

One day at a time, one small prayer at a time, moves us even closer to spiritual security. We can look with glad anticipation at our many responsibilities and activities today. They are our opportunities for spiritual security. We can trust our growing inner resources by simply asking for guidance and waiting patiently. It will find us.

I must exercise my prayers if I want the spiritual security where I can find joy. I will ask for guidance with every activity today.

You are reading from the book:
Each Day a New Beginning by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
08-05-2007, 05:07 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

We need four hugs a day for survival.
We need eight hugs a day for maintenance.
We need twelve hugs a day for growth.
--Virginia Satir

Virginia Satir was an internationally acclaimed therapist. She knew a lot about what people need to be healthy and happy and to live in good relationships with each other. She was very smart, and most of her advice was pretty simple.

Take hugs, for example. What could be more simple? One person reaching out to touch another person with safety and care. Very simple. But what do hugs give people? Comfort. Acceptance. The basics we all need no matter where we are at today.

*Prayer for the Day*

Higher Power, help me ask for the hugs I need and want today. Remind me today to offer hugs to the people around me. And help me feel the big hug You have for me too.

*Today's Action*

Today I will talk with my sponsor about this question: What is easier for me -- to get a hug or to give a hug?

You are reading from the book:
God Grant Me... by Anonymous


NOTE:

I am remembering it is my mothers Birthday today. :)

Happy Birthday Mom. Lotsa hugs. :)

HC
08-05-2007, 06:40 AM
Well done Del! I am seeing that parfait again! :D

Cheers!

MacGyverDel
08-06-2007, 03:43 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Even if you understand and follow all of the rules for more effectively engaging manipulators, life with them is not likely to be easy.
--George K. Simon Jr.

Sometimes they want something. Sometimes they want someone to give them something or to feel a particular way. They want power in some way, shape, or form. Manipulators prey on our weak spots.

Obsession and guilt are weapons. Manipulators get us to use these weapons on ourselves.

Sometimes we can disengage from manipulators - walk away, set a clear limit, be done with them. Other times, it's not that easy. We may be at least temporarily stuck with a boss or authority figure that indulges in heavy manipulation. One of our children may be going through a relentlessly manipulative period. We may have a parent whom we care about deeply who has adapted manipulation as a way of life.

Learn how to effectively deal with manipulators. Not everyone means what they say. . . Learn to recognize when others are telling you what they believe you want to hear. Lean to not react, stay clear, practice nonresistance, and stay true to yourself.

Be gentle with yourself if you have a manipulator in your life. You're not responsible for the other person's attempts at manipulation. You're responsible for staying clear.

God, help me let go the weak spots in myself that allow me to fall prey to manipulations. Help me stay clear of guilt and obsession so I can decide what's best for me.

You are reading from the book:
More Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

:)

MacGyverDel
08-07-2007, 04:53 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Detachment doesn't mean denying compassion.

Approaching life with detachment may seem cold at first. We are accustomed to offering lots of help to other people. Thus the first few times we back off from what has become our natural inclination we feel uncomfortable.

Through this program we are learning so much about ourselves. For example, we never knew that we attained much of our worth from how we took care of others. Detachment doesn't mean we stop loving them. We are discovering that letting them be wholly in charge of themselves is really far more loving And it doesn't mean we can't have deep feelings of care and concern. We simply need to stop doing for others what they need to do for themselves.

I will evaluate my need for taking care of a friend's problem today. Letting others take care of themselves is far more loving.

You are reading from the book:
A Life of My Own by Karen Casey

Domkratos
08-07-2007, 11:06 AM
Even a few smiles will lift my spirits. Keepers of the Wisdom by Karen Casey
:-)

MacGyverDel
08-08-2007, 04:02 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Speaking from the Heart

Through fellowship, we offer each other mutual support. Since we believe that the Higher Power works through the group, what one of us is prompted to say is probably just what another member needs to hear.

Sometimes we are reluctant to speak of what is in our heart for fear of being embarrassed, belittled, or betrayed. We are so accustomed to masking our true feelings that we often lose touch with them. In the program we are assured that what we say will be received in a spirit of acceptance and love. We do not need to be afraid of revealing our deeper selves.

It is a healing experience to belong to a group, which is dedicated to honest communication with a minimum of game playing. When we make a genuine attempt to describe where we are in our program, we are met with a warm and supportive response. Our Higher Power opens the way for meaningful communication and mutual love.

Open our hearts to You and to each other.

You are reading from the book:
Food for Thought by Elisabeth L.

:)

MacGyverDel
08-09-2007, 02:43 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

The hearing ear is always found close to the speaking tongue.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

Listening research shows that we hear only about 60 percent of what is said. This has nothing to do with the functioning of our ears; it has to do with paying attention. Listening is a learnable skill, but it requires focused energy.

Not long ago, I met a woman who thought that her manager considered her boring because he seemed not to listen to her. But soon she recognized that his lack of attentiveness to what she was saying was about his rudeness - not about her personality. While our communication research shows that we have 6,000 words in our spoken vocabulary with 120,000 meanings, imagine how little we truly understand! To truly listen, we must face the speaker and focus on what he or she is saying to us and tune out all the internal "noise" in our heads. When we can truly hear one another, we are creating the possibility for connection.

Just for today, I shall listen attentively, to everyone, with undivided attention.

You are reading from the book:

Igniting the Spirit at Work by Marilyn Mason

:)

MacGyverDel
08-10-2007, 01:38 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Money may not buy happiness, but it can buy the type of misery you can live with.
-- Zibby

We think to ourselves, "Wouldn't it be nice not to have to worry about the washer breaking down?" "Wouldn't it be nice to drive a reliable car?" "Wouldn't it be nice to take a Caribbean vacation every year?" "Wouldn't it be nice not to have to work?" If we had money, we think, at least we wouldn't have to worry so much and could live comfortably.

True. Money buys external comfort - plush couches and chairs, luxury cars, beautiful environments. Money buys what comforts and soothes us on the outside. And, if we're going to be miserable anyway, why not do it in comfort?

We remember that regardless of our surroundings, misery is misery. Unless we have the right attitude, we'll find something wrong with whatever we have or don't have. When we work on improving our inner world on alleviating the real cause of our misery - we know true comfort. We know serenity.

Today I know that the better I get, the richer I become.

You are reading from the book:
Letting Go of Debt by Karen Casanova

:)

Note;

Here's my negative 2 cents. (-2 cents) :o

Debt is high all over the country. The average North American is more than $20,000 in debt. Majority of that is credit card debt. :eek: This was 2 years ago. :mad:

MacGyverDel
08-11-2007, 01:58 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Trust

An attitude of helpful expectancy can serve me very well today. My Higher Power has my day in His hands. Whatever happens, it will go most smoothly, and I will feel best about myself, if I am open to what the day brings, and at peace with whatever it holds for me.

I can give my best if I do not get bogged down in hurt, anger, and resentment. Instead, I'll try to trust in my Higher Power. I'll have faith that good will come my way.

Help me today to be flexible and willing in my work. . . Help me to learn trust in a new way.

You are reading from the book:
Help for Helpers by Anonymous


:) A good one today I must say. http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/coffeetime.gif

MacGyverDel
08-12-2007, 01:06 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

A.A. Thought for the Day

We used to run people down all the time. We realize now that it was because we wanted unconsciously to build ourselves up. We were envious of people who lived normal lives. We couldn't understand why we couldn't be like them. And so we ran them down. We were always looking for faults in the other person. We have found that we can never make a person any better by criticism. Am I less critical of people?

Meditation for the Day

I must admit my helplessness before my prayer for help will be heard by God. My own need must be recognized before I can ask God for the strength to meet that need. But once that need is recognized, my prayer is heard above all the music of heaven.

Prayer for the Day

I pray that I may send my voiceless cry for help out into the void. I pray that I may feel certain that it will be heard somewhere, somehow.

You are reading from the book:
Twenty-four Hours a Day for Teens by Anonymous

Nice;
A great daily meditation book. I have and still read from the original 24 hours a Day. :)

MacGyverDel
08-13-2007, 12:30 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Should you shield the valleys from the windstorms, you would never see the beauty of their canyons.
--Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

Time teaches us about the twofold connection of suffering and wisdom. For every loss, we've gained something new. We are learning that our pain makes us wise over time, but while we are in its midst we often feel alone and entrapped. We sometimes can make no sense out of our suffering - neither its depth nor its seeming unfairness - and we may even turn our backs on our Higher Power. We've only survived the darkness by stumbling through it each day. But in recovery we have gradually allowed ourselves to accept comfort from others, and their words help us in times of desolation.

We are learning that some pains can't be healed, but instead must be endured until they run their course. Sometimes the only hope we have is the deep knowledge that our Higher Power will give us no more than we can handle today. With His help and comfort, we can endure and find peace.

Today let me trust that - even though it may feel painful - my recovery has begun.

You are reading from the book:
Body, Mind, and Spirit by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
08-14-2007, 12:21 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Mile by mile, life's a trial.
Yard by yard, it's not so hard.
Inch by inch, it's a cinch.
-- Proverb


An important key to progress on the path is to take it one step at a time. Just as investing a little on a regular basis builds long-term wealth, the little gains we make each day pay off in spiritual dividends. As a successful musical group explained, "We spent years preparing for our overnight success."

Taking it one step at a time means living in the present moment, letting life gradually reveal itself to us. Some people get nervous and want to know the final outcome. But how can we know an outcome that hasn't yet occurred? Trust in the process, and the perfect result will occur.

When our faith wavers, we often get ahead of ourselves and try to figure out what is going to happen. This "future tripping" removes us from our source of guidance in the present. Sometimes we try to hit it big in a hurry. But there is no fooling the Universe. Sooner or later we will have to go back and retrace the steps that we skipped. The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.

Whatever the goal or desire, approach it one step at a time. Small measures consistently taken guarantee progress. Eventually you will emerge victorious, having attained a reward that you have truly earned.

You are reading from the book:
Listening to Your Inner Voice by Douglas Bloch

:)

empresscat
08-14-2007, 08:21 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Should you shield the valleys from the windstorms, you would never see the beauty of their canyons.
--Elisabeth Kubler-Ross




I love that quote.
Similar to something I used to say:
"If it were not for the rocks in its bed, the river would have no song."

dartol
08-14-2007, 08:28 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Mile by mile, life's a trial.
Yard by yard, it's not so hard.
Inch by inch, it's a cinch.
-- Proverb


Hey that is a really good one. That is something I have a problem with... if I can't see making the mile, I tend to not want to start moving inches. I need to adjust my perspective sometimes. I think I am going to borrow that quote from ya! Thanks for posting it.

Darren

MacGyverDel
08-14-2007, 08:47 AM
:rolleyes: (Finally today's showed up.) :)

Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Changing

You cannot build a house or a life without some foundation. While we were still drinking or using drugs, it seemed our lives could not change. There was no foundation to build on. We had no working principles in our lives. We found we could not become the good things we wanted to become.

Until we quit drinking or using, we didn't know that there was a way we could make ourselves, one day at a time, into the kind of person we could accept. But the Steps and the fellowship make personality change possible.

How have I changed?

Higher Power, let me be willing to love myself and live myself into a new life, one day at a time, based on honesty, open mindedness, and willingness.

You are reading from the book:
Day by Day - Second Edition by Anonymous

:)

MacGyverDel
08-15-2007, 12:37 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

If we had absolute faith in our Higher Power to keep us from all distress and if we turned our problems entirely over to Him without reservation, we would not have to do anything more about it. We'd be free from our afflictions once and for all. But since our faith is likely to be weak, we have to strengthen and build this faith. We do this in several ways. One-way is by going to meetings and listening to others tell how they have found all the strength they need to overcome their turmoil. Is my faith being strengthened by this personal witness of others afflicted?

MEDITATION FOR THE DAY

It is the quality of my life that determines its value. In order to judge the value of a person's life, we must set up standards. The most valuable life is one of honesty, purity, unselfishness, and love. All people's lives ought to be judged by this standard in determining their value to the world. By this standard, most of the so-called heroes of history were not great men. "What shall it profit a man if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul?"

PRAYER FOR THE DAY

I pray that I may be honest, pure, unselfish, and loving. I pray that I may make the quality of my life good by these standards.

You are reading from the book:
Look to this Day by Alan L. Roeck

:)

MacGyverDel
08-16-2007, 02:30 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself.
--D. H. Lawrence

Sometimes when we feel sorry for ourselves we will sit alone in our bedroom. We may even feel so down in the dumps that we decide to stay there, indulging in self-pity, thinking about how the world is against us.

However, if we use our imagination to step outside our own point of view for a moment, we might think differently. If we were deer in the forest, we would be thinking about keeping safe from the wolves, and where our next meal would be coming from.

The animals have no time to feel sorry for themselves, they are too busy doing what has to be done to survive, and each thing that happens presents a new survival problem to be solved.

When we feel blue, it helps to keep this in mind. If we have the time to feel down, and can get physically comfortable while doing it, how bad can the problem really be?

You are reading from the book:
Today's Gift by Anonymous




:)

MacGyverDel
08-17-2007, 02:51 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

If an idea, I reasoned, were really a valuable one, there must be some way of realizing it.
--Elizabeth Blackwell

These words were written by the first woman who earned a medical degree. They're useful to anyone who fears that their most precious dreams are doomed to failure.

If our dreams are valuable ideas, they will be useful goals. If they're childish fantasies, they won't, although those can be fun. It's important to distinguish the ones we can achieve from the ones we can't. The first kind will nourish us, like bread; the others, like candy, won't.

We have a responsibility to those nourishing dreams, because they come from what's best in us. Our responsibility is to live so that the dream might be realized. When dreams become goals, they have a way of calling us forth. Goals organize our lives, so that we may reach them.

Reaching my goal is never as important as the progress I make.

You are reading from the book:
The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey and Martha Vanceburg


:)

Random907
08-17-2007, 03:01 AM
Keep us posted, eh?

MacGyverDel
08-18-2007, 03:11 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

He who helps a friend in woe is like a fur coat in the snow.
--Russian Proverb

We came in from a very hard life when we came into recovery, kind of like coming in from a blizzard in Siberia! The old life was dangerous, cold, and lonely, and it forced us to use all our energy just to survive. Sooner or later it would have killed us. We were definitely in woe.

Someone - a family member, a friend, a boss, a probation officer - offered us a chance to get sober. That person saved our life, as surely as if he or she walked out into a blizzard and wrapped around us like a fur coat. Thanks to our Higher Power, we accepted the help this time.

In the future we will have the chance to help others who are still out there freezing in the blizzard of addiction. We can offer them the kind of help that saved our life. We can't make them accept our help though. We just keep it handy, like a fur coat, in case they reach out to accept it.

Prayer For The Day

Higher Power I am willing to help another addict. I will be ready when You put someone in front of me.

Today's Action

Is there an alcoholic or an addict in my life I wish I could help? I realize that my example is the best way to show them recovery. I will talk with my sponsor about this person and how I am best able to help him or her today.

You are reading from the book:
God Grant Me... by Anonymous


:)

MacGyverDel
08-19-2007, 01:22 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Is there room in your day for the unexpected?

Recovery works best for me when I'm open to what comes along each day. I used to set rigid schedules for myself, write long lists of things to do, and proceed through the day wearing the blinders of my preconceived scenario. Binges were my way of rebelling against my own rigidity and also a protest against whatever upset my carefully made plans.

We miss a lot when we try to impose our own structure on the events of the day. Perhaps we do it out of anxiety, and perhaps we do it to feel we're in control, but it doesn't work.

However hard we try to ignore or prevent the unexpected, the unexpected occurs. One of the things recovery teaches us is that we can trust ourselves and our Higher Power to deal with whatever comes along. Using our inner resources, we are free to respond spontaneously to the real life situations that we encounter.

Today, I will be open to the unexpected. Who knows? It might be fun!

You are reading from the book:
Inner Harvest by Elisabeth L.


:)

CheryleB
08-19-2007, 06:28 AM
To speak ill of others is a dishonest way of praising ourselves.
--Will Durant



Excellent message and well worth repeating.

MacGyverDel
08-20-2007, 03:19 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

I am responsible for myself; my recovery, my well-being, my happiness, all these things are, ultimately, my own responsibility.
--Anonymous

Our Higher Power does not lay claim to our free will. We can choose not to be responsible and make ourselves more miserable by going to new levels of despair and depression. Or we can seize every opportunity for a better life. We are responsible.

When we were newcomers and just getting started, we were generally very confused. We welcomed the support. Many of us were fed up with our lives and would have freely turned them in for a different model. But we learned to put into action what we were learning. We are responsible.

Our sponsors give us good advice and sound instructions. We can choose to listen to the advice or not. We are responsible.

Although we will always be dependent on God for our strength, it is up to us to ask God, for that strength and do the necessary work to receive it. We are responsible.

Today, I'll remember my Higher Power has given me free will to accept or reject responsibility. My life is better when I act responsibly.

You are reading from the book:
Easy Does It by Anonymous


:)

MacGyverDel
08-21-2007, 02:12 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

The Dark Side

Have you ever gone outside at night and looked closely at the new moon? Or looked through a telescope at the moon when it was crescent shaped? Although what we see is a bright slice, we know there's more. Even when the moon is full and lights the night sky, there's a dark side to the moon.

There's a dark side to us too. We all experience jealousy, envy, bitterness, resentment. How about neediness? Ugh. Who wants to shine a light on that?

What about all those fears? Fear of failure, fear of success, fear of intimacy, fear of going broke, fear of the unknown, fear of growing old, fear of being alone, fear of being with someone, fear of losing control.

Then there are other parts of us that we would prefer to keep darkened and out of sight, parts such as greed, dishonesty, intolerance, disgust, hatred. Although some people have no problem showing anger, others of us prefer to keep that out of sight too. And what about our manipulative part? Who wants anyone to see that?

Some of us may even consider the dark side of ourselves forbidden. We may refuse to acknowledge it exists because we believe it's wrong. Not acknowledging our dark side doesn't wish it out of existence, any more than not seeing the dark side of the moon makes it disappear.

Most sane people agree that they don't want to be controlled by their dark side. We don't want parts of ourselves - jealousy, neediness, and greed - to control our behaviors. But when we don't acknowledge these emotions and traits, they can gain control. The more we try to repress something, the more it fights for its life.

Don't be afraid. Shine a light on that dark part. At least look at it briefly. Acknowledge it's there. Take some of the pressure off. Let yourself be well rounded, instead of one-dimensional. We don't just have a light side, a bright side. Nobody is always loving, always kind, always generous, and always thoughtful.

You are reading from the book:
52 Weeks of Conscious Contact by Melody Beattie


:)

MacGyverDel
08-22-2007, 12:46 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Reflection for the Day

Just for today, I'll not be afraid of anything. If my mind is clouded with nameless fears, I'll track them down and expose their unreality. I'll remind myself that God is in charge of me and my life, and that all I have to do is accept His protection and guidance. What happened yesterday need not trouble me today. Do I accept the fact that it's in my power to make today a good one just by the way I think about it and what I do about it?

Today I Pray

May I make today a good day. May I know that it is up to me to assign to it qualities of goodness, through a positive attitude toward what the present is providing. May I be untroubled by vestiges of yesterday. Please, God, remain close to me all through this day.

Today I Will Remember

To make it good.

You are reading from the book:
A Day at a Time (Softcover) by Anonymous

;)

MacGyverDel
08-23-2007, 12:33 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Regret is an appalling waste of energy, you can't build on it: it's only good for wallowing in.
--Katherine Mansfield

Newcomer

Someone I hoped would be an important part of my life for years to come has left. I'm devastated. I don't know how much of what happened is my fault; I keep thinking, "If only I hadn't said what I said . . . "

Sponsor

Human lives are filled with all kinds of separation. Friends, mates, and family members - the people in our lives are only lent to us. If they accompany us for some part of our journey, we're blessed. We don't get to control or keep them.

Sentences beginning "if only" can go nowhere but straight to regret. They support our false belief that we can control what happens in other people's lives. "I should have," "I could have," and "I would have" are all variations on the same theme. They postpone acceptance and necessary grieving.

At times it's we ourselves who do the leaving. We can count it a success, not a failure, when we've had the courage to acknowledge the truth of an ending.

Today though I may go through some pain as I learn acceptance, I rejoice in the strength and clarity it gives me.

You are reading from the book:
If You Want What We Have by Joan Larkin


;)

MacGyverDel
08-24-2007, 01:38 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Self-pity in its early stages is as snug as a feather mattress. Only when it hardens does it become uncomfortable.
--Maya Angelou

Some days we grasp at self-pity like a blanket on a cold night, and we are momentarily comforted. However, extended periods of self-pity will undermine our primary purpose, which is to be at peace with ourselves and others so that we may know freedom from our addictions. Thus our self-pity prevents us from carrying a message of hope to fellow sufferers, that they too can find release from their suffering through the Twelve Steps.

Staying clean and sober are gifts available to all of us when we cultivate gratitude. We can be grateful for this program that has brought manageability and serenity to our life, and that leaves us little room for self-pity, anger, or impatience. Our mind will be willing and open to receive God's guidance and support when we let go of our self-pity.

Today I will stay free of self-pity so I can receive God's strength.

You are reading from the book:
In God's Care by Karen Casey

;)

rbeckett
08-24-2007, 05:12 PM
Keep em coming Del. The world need a little positive to replace the negative we are bombarded with from wake till sleep. Luv Ya Man.

MacGyverDel
08-25-2007, 05:15 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Having loosened our grip on the past, we are free to reach for the future.
--Ann D. Clark

Everyday of our lives we think of some situation we wish we had handled differently. Perhaps we left a job we now miss, disciplined a child needlessly, or responded rudely to a friend. Our Fourth Step inventory abundantly details our many regrets, but the past is gone. We can't take back the job or the punishment or the rude responses. However, we can make certain the Tenth Step we do every night is not filled with similar regrets.

Recovery has given us a second chance. Let's not waste this gift by hanging on to what can't be changed. We all know what we don't like about our behavior in the past. That's all we need to remember when we decide how to behave in the present. We won't be ashamed in the future, if we take charge of our present.

Today is a new beginning. Whatever happened in my past need not control what I do with today. Today is mine to be proud of.

You are reading from the book:
A Woman's Spirit by Karen Casey

:)

MacGyverDel
08-26-2007, 01:34 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Friendship and Love

Friendships or marriages based on "dire need" or physical security are doomed to fail if each person in the relationship does not grow beyond his or her limited ways of thinking and reacting.

The ideal relationship is one in which each partner strives to grow. It is an ever-expanding commitment, mutually supportive of healthy interdependence. A healthy relationship encourages the seeking of wider mental and spiritual horizons; it is never threatened permanently by them.

TODAY Do I give my loved ones enough room to grow? Do I encourage my friends or mate to do things without me? Am I threatened by change or do I welcome it? Do I have the courage to do things on my own, even if my loved ones do not give me support? Do I have the courage and consideration to share my changes with those I love?

Let the purpose of all marriages and friendships alike be the deepening of the spirit and the enrichment of the soul.

You are reading from the book:
The Reflecting Pond by Liane Cordes

:)

MacGyverDel
08-27-2007, 03:54 AM
They are able because they think they are able.
--Virgil

For most of us, addiction was full of doubt. We stopped believing in ourselves. Our thoughts had turned to "stinkin' thinkin'. " We didn't believe in much of anything. We didn't take risks. We always looked for the easier, softer way.

In recovery, we start to believe again. We believe in the program. We believe in a Higher Power. We believe in people. And, over time, we believe in ourselves again. We become better at taking risks.

We are able to stay sober because we believe, because we take risks. As we stay sober, we can face almost anything - with the help of others.

Prayer for the Day

Higher Power, I have learned to believe in You. Help me believe in myself. I have something to give to this world. Help me give it freely.

Action for the Day

Today, I'll list ten good points about myself. I'll go over these good points with a friend.

You are reading from the book:
Keep It Simple by Anonymous


:)

MacGyverDel
08-28-2007, 01:13 AM
We are not unlike a particularly hardy crustacean. ... With each passage from one stage of human growth to the next, we, too, must shed a protective structure.
--Gail Sheehy

Our passage into a new stage of development was initiated by our desire to stop using chemicals. The values we lived by while using chemicals no longer fit us. We need to shed our old skin and grow a new one that reflects our current worldview.

We are now, and always will be, in the stage of becoming, of trying to fulfill our changing dreams and aspirations. What we can accomplish at one stage of life is different from what we can handle at another. And yet an overall design is being shaped by all our endeavors. The more willing we are to shed yet another skin, the more centered, stable, and spirit filled we'll become.

Do my actions fit my values? As I outgrow my values, I will release them. I will relish my growth today and celebrate my new skin.

You are reading from the book:
A Woman's Spirit by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
08-29-2007, 12:57 AM
Somebody's boring me - I think it's me.
--Dylan Thomas

Sobriety and recovery are supposed to be fun. Otherwise no one would do it. If we're bored or stagnant, it's because we're not doing recovery right. Recovery is a wonderful adventure filled with new faces, growth, love, acceptance, laughs, peace, serenity, comfort, and fellowship. If we can't find any of that, we need to find out why. Maybe we're purposely trying to avoid the good stuff of sobriety so we can set ourselves up to use again. Or maybe we just need to try some new friends or get involved with a social activity. Today we have the power to take action on our own behalf.

Today don't let me get away with blaming my boredom on somebody or something else.

You are reading from the book:
Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast

MacGyverDel
08-30-2007, 01:26 AM
If the best man's faults were written on his forehead, it would make him pull his hat over his eyes.
--Gaelic proverb

When we deal with our faults and imperfections, we are dealing with the basic issues of being a person. We can become bitter and cynical about the imperfections of others, or we can realize every person is incomplete but growing, just as we are. The way we look at the faults in others and the way we look at our own are closely tied together. In our spiritual journey, we must begin with the premise that no person ever achieves perfection.

Perfection apparently is not what this life is about at all, since perfection is nonexistent. We are lovable, and we can love in the process of living our lives. Since we are not perfect, we have to be accountable. We must have standards for our behavior and hold ourselves to those standards, admitting our mistakes and making repairs where we can.

I will try to acknowledge my mistakes and give up the idea of ever becoming perfect.

You are reading from the book:
Touchstones by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
08-31-2007, 01:25 AM
Will Power - Our willingness to be used by a Higher Power.
--Alcoholics Anonymous

How many times have you wanted something very badly, only to realize at a later date that having it would have been a major disaster? Often we pursue a certain want or desire when the Universe has something entirely different planned - something, which is for our higher good.

For years, Ann wanted to run her own day-care center. An opportunity arose for her to buy a local business, but the deal fell through at the last minute. Bitterly disappointed, she could not understand why her heart's desire was denied her. Then one day, she and her husband found out about a business that was for sale in a city where they had always wanted to live. Within weeks, they bought the business and moved to their new location. Ann gave thanks that the first opportunity did not work out.

From our earthly vantage point, we can't always see the big picture. We are like mice running in an open field, sensing what is in front of our noses. Only from the perspective of the eagle can the entire landscape be viewed.

Fortunately, there is a part of yourself that can see like the eagle. You can turn over your life and your plans to that higher vision, and then say with assurance, "It's all God's work. It's all in God's hands. And I am at peace with this."

You are reading from the book:
Listening to Your Inner Voice by Douglas Bloch


:)

MacGyverDel
09-01-2007, 02:30 AM
Accepting Love

Many of us have worked too hard to make relationships work; sometimes those relationships didn't have a chance because the other person was unavailable or refused to participate.

To compensate for the other person's unavailability, we worked too hard. We may have done all or most of the work. Doing all the work in a relationship is not loving, giving, or caring. It is self-defeating and relationship defeating. It creates the illusion of a relationship when in fact there may be no relationship. It enables the other person to be irresponsible for his or her share. Because that does not meet our needs, we ultimately feel victimized.

We can learn to participate a reasonable amount, and then let the relationship find it's own life. Are we doing all the calling? Are we doing all the initiating? Are we doing all the giving? Are we the one talking about feelings and striving for intimacy?

Are we doing all the waiting, the hoping, and the work?

We can let go. If the relationship is meant to be, it will be, and it will become what it is meant to be. We do not help that process by trying to control it. We do not help ourselves, the other person, or the relationship by trying to force it or by doing all the work.

Let it be. Wait and see. Stop worrying about making it happen. See what happens and strive to understand if that is what you want.

Today, I will stop doing all the work in my relationships. I will give myself and the other person the gift of requiring both people to participate. I do not have to do all the work; I need only do my share.

You are reading from the book:
The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

:)

MacGyverDel
09-02-2007, 01:32 AM
Our work brings people face to face with love.
--Mother Teresa

Whether we are sowing a garden, tending the sick, role modeling for children, or climbing the corporate ladder, many opportunities are present for acting from a posture of love. Love is an attitude, one born from gratitude for all we have, all we are, and all we hope to be. We cultivate a loving outlook just as surely as we cultivate gardens and friendships.

The guilt or shame we sometimes feel prompts us to remember those moments when we were faced with the choice to love but failed to love - those times we barked answers, scowled at someone special, slammed drawers and doors. Fortunately, we need not be perfect. Each moment promises us a new opportunity to choose love as our response to the many people and the changing events in our lives.

Some decisions can be made once for all time. Using seat belts is such a decision. So is offering love to the world that greets us.

You are reading from the book:
Worthy of Love by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
09-03-2007, 02:35 AM
Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.
--William James

Many of us learned as children that rejection and abandonment are part and parcel of being alive. We are so used to feeling as though things won't work out, that fear - like a shadow - is always lurking behind us. Usually there's something specific to be afraid of - that we won't have enough money to pay our bills, someone we love will die, or our children won't do well in school. And always there's the generalized fear that events will overwhelm us in spite of our best efforts.

We need to be careful about creating what we look for. Regardless of the frightening experiences of the past, we need to believe that other results are possible: All loved ones don't leave, all risks don't end in devastation, and all efforts aren't dashed on the rocks of defeat.

New consequences are possible when we believe they're possible. The brave new world that each of us seeks stands on the shoulders of that belief.

I am sick and tired of being fearful. Today, I am confident that positive efforts will yield positive results.

You are reading from the book:
Days of Healing, Days of Joy by Earnie Larsen and Carol Larsen Hegarty


:)

MacGyverDel
09-04-2007, 04:07 AM
(September 4th.)

Ordinary moments

Saving a time for quiet appreciation...

An aesthetic life, in the broad sense, is a spiritual life. Couples can strengthen their partnership and enrich their lives by making aesthetic experiences daily events. Saving time for quiet appreciation of the good things in our lives - communicating with each other and with friends, playing and relaxing, reading to children, cooking and eating tasty, nourishing food - these are some ways to bring beauty into each day. We can also put attractive pictures and interesting things in our home to make it a place that comforts and pleases us; we can read interesting books, notice a striped caterpillar on a milkweed or the splash of stars in the night sky, relish the sensuous pleasure of a warm soapy bath, see a good movie, listen to music, grow plants.

We live spiritually when we make a place for beauty and when we slow down to enjoy the beauty that already surrounds us. We may wonder what good that may do us. The answer is that these spiritual gestures add meaning to all the other parts of our lives.

Take a few minutes now to appreciate something beautiful. Make a plan to bring some beauty into this day.

You are reading from the book:
The More We Find In Each Other by Merle Fossum and Mavis Fossum

MacGyverDel
09-05-2007, 02:51 AM
People are lonely because they build walls instead of bridges.
--Joseph Fort Newton

Remember building snow forts? After a sticky snowfall we'd build a big snow wall. Then we'd mass-produce snowballs, preparing for battle. The team who built the best snow fort usually won, for their wall provided the best protection.

Are we still playing snow fort when we meet new people or spend time with family? Each of us has a wall we started building in our childhood. Each time we were hurt, we would fortify the wall to offer greater protection. We may not even realize it now, but we may have such strong, high walls in front of us that even the most ardent friends can't get over them.

We may feel protected behind our wall, but we may also feel lonely. Walls are built to keep people out. To feel less lonely, we need to make a little crawl space to let people in. We don't have to destroy our walls in one day, but perhaps we can let at least one person in. We will learn, one person at a time, what it feels like to be less protected, and less lonely.

I can make an opening in my wall of protection and let someone get to know me. I will be safe.

You are reading from the book:
Night Light by Amy E. Dean

MacGyverDel
09-06-2007, 12:49 AM
You really need to take care of yourself because you won't be good for anyone else unless you take care of yourself.
-- Harry Bartholomew

Do we merely assume we are taking good care of ourselves? It's perhaps a good idea to list all the ways we think this is true. Do we get enough exercise? What is enough, anyway? Are we eating the right foods and enough of them? How about rest? Do we take naps when needed, as well as get a good night's sleep? What about laughter? Some would say there's no better elixir than a good laugh. Of course, we have to be willing to laugh at ourselves, on occasion, to make the most of it.

Taking good care of ourselves is much more in our control than we might have imagined. While it's true that some of us need a devoted caregiver because of our infirmities, we are able to laugh at will and to eat what's good for us. We are also very much in control of how we feel about the circumstances of our lives. Whether we think we have it good or bad has a great deal to do with the details of each day.

We're not much fun to be around if all we do is moan and whine. Neither response ever takes good care of us. And both of them hinder the day's experiences for our companions, too.

The best thing I can do for me today is smile at my life, my friends, my remaining dreams. I can show I care.

You are reading from the book:
Keepers of the Wisdom by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
09-07-2007, 03:29 AM
Today, I will solve the problems of today. I might have become so focused on solving all the problems in my life that I haven't noticed the little problems that arise each day.

Do I have anything that needs to be completed or resolved today? I will take a moment each day and work on what I need to do just for that day. Even though solving long-term problems is necessary, so is solving the smaller daily problems. Not allowing things to pile up keeps me from feeling overwhelmed.

Today I will pay attention to what needs to be solved today.

You are reading from the book:
Time to Fly Free by Judith R. Smith

:)

MacGyverDel
09-08-2007, 08:43 AM
Be grateful for where you are now.

"It doesn't take as much faith to believe that everything happens for a reason as it does to embrace the belief that I am who and where I am now, today, for a reason - even if I don't know what that reason is and even if I don't particularly like who or where I am today, " a friend said to me.

"When I can take that in, my dissatisfaction and negativity disappear, and I can proceed calmly and gratefully with my life. To me," he said, "that's what spirituality is all about."

Faith and hope aren't just for the future. Try using them on today.

Could it be that you're who you are and where you are now for a reason? Thank God for your life, exactly as it is, right now.

God, give me enough faith to believe in today.

You are reading from the book:
More Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie




NOTE: (Sorry I'm late with this today.) :o

jwdjrs
09-08-2007, 09:03 AM
Good thread Del.....Peace buddy

MacGyverDel
09-09-2007, 03:58 AM
:)^^^Thanks Jerry^^^:)


Today's thoughts from Hazelden are:

God can't hand you anything new
until you let go of what you're holding.

*****
If you keep bringing your body,
your mind will follow.

*****
Every AA meeting is a payment on your sobriety.

*****
My problems are self-made.

*****
Yesterday is so far in the past I can't see it;
tomorrow is too distant in the future to be seen.
So I'll take a good look at what I can see - today.

You are reading from the book:

My Mind Is Out to Get Me by Dr. Ron B.

MacGyverDel
09-10-2007, 03:28 AM
Patience is a particular requirement. Without it, you can destroy in an hour what it might take you weeks to repair.
--Charlie W. Shedd

Enjoying the moment, in its fullest, makes possible a peaceful and patient pace. Progress is guaranteed if our minds are centered in the present, on the only event deserving of our attention. We can be certain that error and frustration will haunt us if our attentions are divided.

Patience will see us through a troubled time, but how much easier it is to savor patience when it's accompanied by faith. We can know and fully trust that all is well - that our lives are on course - that individual experiences are exactly what we need at this moment. However, faith makes the knowing easier and the softness of the patient heart eases us through the times of challenge and uncertainty.

Patience slows me down long enough to notice another, and to be grateful for the gifts of the moment. Patience promises me the power to move forward with purpose. Today's fruits will be in proportion to my patience.


You are reading from the book:
The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey and Martha Vanceburg

:)

MacGyverDel
09-11-2007, 01:42 AM
What would it be like if you lived each day, each breath, as a work of art in progress? Imagine that you are a masterpiece unfolding, every second of every day, a work of art taking form with every breath.
-- Thomas Crum

So many of us avoid living in the present moment. We worry about the future.

Daydreaming and pondering are necessary in moderation, but we try to stay in the present moment for most of the day. To do this, we return to the most basic element - our breath. We concentrate on taking deep breaths. Barring a respiratory disorder, breathing is simple. When we return to the simplicity of breathing, we automatically simplify our life by focusing only on what's happening to one part of our body in one moment in time.

Today, when I have trouble living in the present, I will concentrate on my breathing.

You are reading from the book:
Letting Go of Debt by Karen Casanova

MacGyverDel
09-11-2007, 02:23 AM
http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/unitedwestand911.gifhttp://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/27c7scd-1.jpghttp://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/ShowLetter.jpg

HC
09-11-2007, 05:04 AM
X2

MacGyverDel
09-13-2007, 02:05 AM
(PC issues prevented yesterday's addition) :o

Reflection for the Day

It was far easier for me to accept my powerlessness over my addiction than it was for me to accept the notion that some sort of Higher Power could accomplish that which I had been unable to accomplish myself. Simply by seeking help and accepting the fellowship of others similarly afflicted, the craving left me. And I realized that if I was doing what I was powerless alone to do, then surely I was doing so by some Power outside my own and obviously greater. Have I surrendered my life into the hands of God?

Today I Pray

May God erase in me the arrogant pride which keeps me from listening. May my unhealthy dependence on chemicals and my clinging dependence on those near by be transformed into reliance on God. Only in this kind of dependence - reliance - on a Higher Power will I find my own transformation.

Today I Will Remember

I am God-dependent.

You are reading from the book:
A Day at a Time (Softcover) by Anonymous

;)

MacGyverDel
09-13-2007, 02:07 AM
What is defeat?. . . Nothing but the first step to something better.
--Wendell Phillips

A man walks into a meeting. He says, "I surrender. I can't drink like other folks." We smile and welcome him. We know that feeling. All of us in the program must admit defeat. Our illness is more powerful than we are. We begin recovery when we surrender.

Admitting defeat is our first step into a beautiful world. Like all first steps, it's hard. But what a world we find ourselves in! A world where we count! A world where all are really equal!

This first step brings us into God's world of care. We get love. We give love. We stay sober because daily we admit defeat.

Prayer for the Day

I surrender. I can't drink and use other drugs. I'm different. Higher Power, help me surrender daily.

Action for the Day

Every so often, I need to admit defeat and talk about what it was like, what happened, and where I am now.

You are reading from the book:
Keep It Simple by Anonymous

yellowrv
09-13-2007, 03:36 AM
I have had an addiction or two over the years and I receive these inspirational thoughts in my e-mail that have helped my day start on a positive note.

Unfortunately I've been neglecting some area's lately and thought that if I posted these in here daily they would again help me and perhaps others with a positive outlook.

These thoughts cover a variety of areas and may or may not apply but I'm posting them. :)

They are all from "Todays Gift" at Hazelden.

Again this is for my benefit and and if someone here is inspired....great.

If you don't like something then neg me but please no nasty comments.

Thank You All. :)


Thanks so much for this thread, I have been wrestling with the king lately. Time to start the long walk out.

MacGyverDel
09-14-2007, 02:30 AM
Practicing tolerance

Everyone has a different opinion. No two people look the same. We all are different. Differences can cause us fear and set us apart from others, and we have no idea why.

If addiction closes us down, recovery opens us up. In the program, we learn that we are all more alike than we are different. We learn to look for what we share. We learn that we know so little about ourselves (let alone others) and that judgments are not helpful.

Can I live and let live?

Higher Power, help me to see myself in others.

You are reading from the book:
Day by Day - Second Edition by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
09-15-2007, 04:53 AM
;)

The most wasted day of all is that on which we have not laughed.
--Sebastien R. N. Chamfort

When we first started going to Twelve Step meetings we were often stunned to hear so much laughter. But we soon learned that a good hearty laugh or a joyful smile is as important to our recovery as all the serious issues we explore.

Learning to laugh is part of our growth. It recognizes our shared experiences and helps us feel closer to one another. It also reminds us we are able to smile again, and that a better perspective on life is returning.

We only have today to live, and we are getting better today, so why not smile and enjoy it? Why not open ourselves up to a good laugh and let it push our pain or sorrow out? Now that we are once again choosing how we feel, we have the power to opt for joy.

Today I am grateful for my ability to laugh and share laughter and fun.

You are reading from the book:
Body, Mind, and Spirit by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
09-16-2007, 01:38 AM
A.A. Thought for the Day

How big a part of our lives is AA? Is it just one of our activities and a small one at that? Do we only go to AA meetings now and then and sometimes never go at all? Do we think of AA only occasionally? Are we reticent about mentioning the subject of AA to people who might need help? Or does AA fill a large part of our lives? Is AA the foundation on which I build my life?

Meditation for the Day

I lay upon God my failures and mistakes and shortcomings. I do not dwell upon my failures, upon the fact that in the past I have been nearer a beast than an angel. I have a mediator between me and God -- my growing faith.

Prayer for the Day

I pray that I may not let the beast in me hold me back from my spiritual destiny.

You are reading from the book:
Twenty-four Hours a Day for Teens by Anonymous

;)

MacGyverDel
09-17-2007, 02:50 AM
Should everybody like me?

When people say they are people-pleasers, they're acknowledging that it's a problem.

It's a problem because it reflects a desire to have everybody's acceptance and approval - to be universally liked. But from what we know about human relationships, this is not possible. No matter how hard we work to be pleasant and likeable, some people may still detest us for reasons we cannot understand. When that happens, we should not blame ourselves or step up our efforts to win them over. Our best course is to be cordial to them and to avoid giving offense in any way.

If our own behavior is mature and reasonable, even the people who don't like us will at least respect us. That may be the best we can hope for, and it is certainly far better than shameless people pleasing. In the end, people-pleasers don't please anybody and, as a famous comedian notes about himself, they "get no respect."

I'll try hard to be pleasant and cordial to everyone I meet today. If some people do not respond in the same way. I'll accept this without feeling hurt or betrayed.

You are reading from the book:
Walk in Dry Places by Mel B.

;)

MacGyverDel
09-18-2007, 03:13 AM
Hope is a good breakfast, but it is a bad supper.
--Francis Bacon

Each day we hope for accomplishment and satisfaction and we'll achieve these when we scale our hopes to our real capacities. There's no more satisfying feeling than finishing a project we've set up ourselves, tailored to our abilities, and worked at with patience and care. Our lives can be filled with such successes.

Learning to live means learning to keep ourselves in the present. This day is all we really have to work with. 0f course today will be influenced by what has already happened; and its influence will extend to tomorrow, next week, and beyond. But all we can make or do lies here, within this window of space and time.

May my supper be contentment. I'll breakfast on hope again.

You are reading from the book:
The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey and Martha Vanceburg

:)

MacGyverDel
09-19-2007, 12:20 AM
We don't need crutches.

We are unique and wonderful people. We have weaknesses, yes, and we also have strengths beyond our imagining.

Perhaps we needed a crutch at one time. We got used to it, and even though it was in our way and slowed us down, we were afraid to venture forth without it. Gradually, the crutch began to control our movements and take over our life. We became its slave.

Then we were invited to consider the possibility of a Higher Power that would eliminate our need for a crutch. Intrigued, we began to practice relying on this Higher Power in concrete ways on a daily basis.

We are learning how to walk again. Scary sometimes, without the old props, but Step by Step we're on our way to recovery.

Just for today, I will put away the crutches I no longer need and rely on my Higher Power.

You are reading from the book:
Inner Harvest by Elisabeth L.

MacGyverDel
09-20-2007, 01:01 AM
The most useless day of all is that in which we have not laughed.
--Sebastien R.N. Chamfort

When we wallowed in the self-pity of obsession, we were sure we'd never laugh again. How easy it was to weep, alone and secretly, inspired by sad music like "Born to Lose" or "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry."

What a shock it was to hear people laugh in our first few meetings! How could they laugh about something as serious as addiction? What an awakening when we were able to join the laughter!

We laughed with them as they laughed at the sad objects they once were. Today we can also laugh for pure joy at being free of restraints, and in gratitude for the resolve not to return to our old ways. We can laugh just for being alive.

Laughter is a source of growth for me. It keeps me thinking positively. It reduces the stress of problems. It tells me that any effort at progress is worthwhile. Laughter is progress.

You are reading from the book:
Easy Does It by Anonymous



:D

MacGyverDel
09-21-2007, 02:11 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Reflection for the Day

Even with a growing understanding of The Program and its Twelve Steps, we sometimes might find it difficult to believe that our new way of life leads to personal freedom. Suppose, for example, I feel imprisoned in an uncomfortable job or troublesome personal relationship. What am I doing about it? In the past, my reflex reaction was to try to manipulate the things and people around me into being more acceptable to me. Today, I realize that happiness can't be won that way.

Am I learning that freedom from despair and frustration can come only from changing, in myself, the attitudes that are perpetuating the conditions that cause me grief?

Today I Pray

May I be given clear eyes to see and then to stop myself when I am manipulating the lives of those around me, my daily associates, friends, and family. May I always be aware that change must begin within myself.

Today I will remember

Change from the inside out.

You are reading from the book:
A Day at a Time (Softcover) by Anonymous

;)

MacGyverDel
09-22-2007, 12:27 AM
There is no love apart from the deeds of love;
no potentiality of love but that which is manifested in loving.
--Jean-Paul Sartre

Newcomer

Sometimes I wonder if I can give or receive love. When I think about my past in active addiction, there was passion and drama, but not a lot of love. There hasn't been much of it in my recovery so far either.

Sponsor

What exactly are we talking about when we talk about love? Many of us - and this was certainly true of me - have used this word primarily to describe a fantasy. We imagined that somewhere there was an ideal person who could meet all our needs and make us whole. Love meant rescue or a problem-free relationship. When we didn't find it, we bewailed our loneliness and bad luck.

Love is not something that is bestowed on us. We can create it, everyday. It grows in each of us as we take actions that affirm our respect and caring for others and ourselves. Love is not limited to romantic encounters, but extends to our daily relationships with other people, including our friends and members of our communities. Love is not in scarce supply. Our acts of kindness and service and our practice of genuine tolerance renew love in the world and in our hearts.

Today, I add to the abundance of many kinds of love in my life.

You are reading from the book:
If You Want What We Have by Joan Larkin



:)

MacGyverDel
09-23-2007, 12:51 AM
There is no happiness; there are only moments of happiness.
-- Spanish proverb

How happy we are right now may hinge on dinnertime - whether it is just before or just after. It may also depend on whether we are examining ourselves to see if we are happy or not. There's nothing like a little introspection to convince a person of the futility of life. Just asking the question, "Am I happy?" is enough to put him or her into a blue mood.

Moments of happiness, like creative thoughts, pass before us all the time. If we want to enjoy them, it's up to us to reach out and take them when they appear. The opportunities are boundless, and they all come dressed up like other people. No one has ever been happy for long in isolation. We are not, by nature, solitary creatures. God gave us people to be with. And as an incentive to be kind to one another. God made each of us a source of happiness for others.

If there's anybody around, I won't have to look far for happiness today.

You are reading from the book:
In God's Care by Karen Casey

:)

MacGyverDel
09-24-2007, 12:23 AM
Staying in the Present Moment ;)

Often, one of our biggest questions is "What's going to happen?" We may ask this about our relationships, our career, our recovery, and our life. It is easy to tangle ourselves up in worrisome thoughts.

Worrying about what's going to happen blocks us from functioning effectively today. It keeps us from doing our best now. It blocks us from learning and mastering today's lessons. Staying in the now, doing our best, and participating fully today are all we need to do to assure ourselves that what's going to happen tomorrow will be for the best.

Worrying about what's going to happen is a negative contribution to our future. Living in the here and now is ultimately the best thing we can do, not only for today, but also for tomorrow. It helps our relationships, our career, our recovery, and our life.

Things will work out, if we let them. If we must focus on the future other than to plan, all we need to do is affirm that it will be good.

I pray for faith that my future will be good if I live today well, and in peace. I will remember that staying in the present is the best thing I can do for my future. I will focus on what's happening now instead of what's going to happen tomorrow.

You are reading from the book:
The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

MacGyverDel
09-25-2007, 12:28 AM
;)
There only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that's your own self. So you have to begin there, not outside, not on other people. That comes afterward, when you've worked on your own corner.
--Aldous Huxley

Taking responsibility for our own attitudes, actions, and neglects is far more difficult than managing and directing other people's lives.

Giving advice to another, for example, is much easier that practicing what we preach. If we would apply our advice to our own lives, we would have less time to criticize, correct, or interfere in someone else's difficulties. Moreover, we would be amazed at how many alternatives we have within our own grasp that could solve, or at least alleviate, the problems in our lives.

TODAY - Let me realize I am far more positive and predictive when I concentrate my efforts and thoughts on changing myself and my own actions. Give me the courage to act on my own internal wisdom.

You are reading from the book:
The Reflecting Pond by Liane Cordes

MacGyverDel
09-26-2007, 12:39 AM
Today I will remember that there are many people who are going through the same experience as I am, and I'm not alone.

I can reach out to others when I'm ready; I will find other people who will understand. I can attend a support group, call a hot line, or keep telling myself, I'm not alone. I'm not alone. Just knowing this makes me feel better.

But if I break the silence and tell someone I trust, I feel even better.

You are reading from the book:
Time to Break Free by Judith R. Smith

MacGyverDel
09-27-2007, 02:03 AM
Life has lessons to teach. We can remember them and share them with others, or we can forget them and have to learn them again.
--Jan Pishok

What we are destined to learn in this life will keep presenting itself until "contact" has been made. Each experience is a minute part of the big picture that's unfolding. We will receive the information we need, again and again if necessary. Let's give up our fear about where we are going and how
we'll get there. We are in caring, capable hands. We will get to the right destination on time.

In this program we are invited to share with others what our experiences have taught us. What better way to recall, and thus relearn, what we have been taught, than to tell another about it. Every Twelve Step program is specifically designed to simplify our lives. The Steps coach us through every situation, and they never shame us for needing reminders of our lessons.

I will help others through sharing my own experiences today. In the process, I'll recapture the essence of the lessons I have learned.

You are reading from the book:
A Woman's Spirit by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
09-28-2007, 01:33 AM
The love of our neighbor in all its fullness simply means being able to say to him: "What are you going through?"
--Simone Weil

Love is listening to our friends and really hearing what they have to say. Sometimes we find it hard to listen because we are so full of ourselves. We don't hear well when we stop listening and start thinking about our own responses.

We feel most heard when someone doesn't try to fix us or give us all the answers. Mostly, we need a friend to let us pour our hearts out, to tell our stories to. In giving another the same attention we'd like to have, we live by the Golden Rule, and we allow ourselves the rewards of true friendship.

Today let me bring a friend my undivided attention.

You are reading from the book:
Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast



:)

MacGyverDel
09-29-2007, 01:37 AM
That's what happens when you're angry at people. You make them part of your life.
--Garrison Keillor

Our problems with anger and our problems in relationships go hand in hand. Some of us have held back our anger, which led to resentment of our loved ones. Some of us have indulged our anger and become abusive. Some of us have been so frightened of anger that we closed off the dialogue in our relationships when angry feelings came out.

Some of us have wasted our energy by focusing anger on people who weren't really important to us. Do we truly want them to become so important? Yet, perhaps the important relationships got frozen because we weren't open and respectful with our anger. It isn't possible to be close to someone without being angry at times. We let our loved ones be part of our lives by feeling our anger when it is there and expressing it openly, directly, and respectfully to them - or by hearing them when they are angry. Then, with dialogue, we can let it go.

I will be aware of those people I am making important in my life and will grow in dealing with my anger.

You are reading from the book:
Touchstones by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
09-30-2007, 01:21 AM
...praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
-- Second half of Step Eleven

Step Eleven teaches us how to pray. We pray for God's will to replace ours. Our will got us in trouble. God's will guides us to simple serenity. We pray for power to live a spiritual life. This is important, for it takes much strength and courage to live a spiritual life.

The sober path is not always easy. It takes self-discipline. We have to say no to our self-will. We follow God's will for us. The rewards are great. We get sobriety. We get serenity. We get friendship. We regain our family. We get a deep, loving relationship with a Higher Power who wants peace and joy for us and for the world.

Prayer for the Day

Dear Higher Power, I pray the words of Step Eleven. I pray to know Your will for me. And I pray that I have the power to carry out Your will.

Action for the Day

I will examine my life. I will look to see how my will gets in the way of God's will.

You are reading from the book:
Keep It Simple by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
10-01-2007, 12:30 AM
If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams and endeavors to live the life, which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
--Henry David Thoreau

Recently a filmmaker friend approached me with good news. He had just received a grant to do a documentary. "I can't believe it," he said. "I'm finally getting paid for my work. I can't believe how lucky I am to be doing this."

After our conversation, I thought: "This person believes that he is earning a living in spite of doing what he loves; but the reality is just the opposite. It is because he is following his passion that he prospers. As he aligns himself with his higher purpose, the Universe cannot help but make straight, smooth, and perfect his way."

People who say, "Be practical," don't realize that following your heart is the most practical thing one can do. There is no greater way to ensure success than being true to whom you are. On the other hand, there is nothing more likely to block that success than turning away from your calling. Living at cross-purposes with your true nature creates struggle and lack of fulfillment at a deep level. It is hard to be someone other than yourself.

The lesson is clear: As impractical as it may sound, the safest and most secure way to lead your life is to follow your dream.

You are reading from the book:
If You Want What We Have by Joan Larkin

gdogg75
10-01-2007, 01:19 AM
your thread... but good nonetheless

"You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind, but you can change yourself. That is something you have charge of"
Jim Rohn

MacGyverDel
10-01-2007, 03:16 AM
your thread... but good nonetheless

"You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind, but you can change yourself. That is something you have charge of"
Jim Rohn

I am a fan of Jim Rohn and have read some of his stuff. :)

Thank you. ;)

MacGyverDel
10-02-2007, 12:25 AM
;)

The gift of love means this: I want to share with you whatever I have that is good.
-- John Powell, S.J.

How loving are we, really? Do we keep score when we do favors for a friend, keeping in mind that we're owed one? Do we hoard rather than share a favorite treat, hoping to prolong our own feast? And the good mood, when it's ours, do we use it to help another raise her spirits or do we secretly gloat because we're "in a better place"?

The opportunity to respond with love visits us throughout each day. A smile, a kind gesture, including someone in a conversation, noticing a job well done, are acts of love, acts that connect our hearts, at least for a moment.

When someone has shared love with us in some form, we notice it and are moved.

You are reading from the book:
Worthy of Love by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
10-03-2007, 01:47 AM
A man of courage is also full of faith.
-- Cicero

Faith and courage walk hand in hand. Courage empowers us to act in favor of what we believe, but cannot know. Courage is animated by the vision of faith. It doesn't take any faith to perform an action that doesn't require a risk. Only when the outcome is uncertain, and the effort itself a feat of daring, must faith and courage come on the scene together to get the job done.

To reach out to another, if we have known frequent rejection, is to act courageously in spite of an uncertain outcome. To stand firm in a decision, if we have always given in and given up, is to back our faith in a most daring and courageous way.

Many recovering people, who never think of themselves as spiritual, are excellent models of faith because they continually reach out for what is not common in their lives. Because they believe, they're willing and able to take the risk.

Today, I can do what I believe I can do.


You are reading from the book:

Days of Healing, Days of Joy by Earnie Larsen and Carol Larsen Hegarty

MacGyverDel
10-04-2007, 01:25 AM
;) Ordinary moments ... they in turn enrich our lives

Our spiritual life is on the same plane as our everyday relationships. It's not just something within our mind or feelings, and it's not just lofty and in the clouds. Spirituality is between people and in all relationships. Its growth depends on the way we relate to each other as intimate partners. We find it in our relationship to ordinary things like the bread we eat and the water we drink. Spirituality is found in the ways we honor our body with food and touch, work and rest, and in the ways we honor each other.

We jointly extend our spirituality through relationships with others. As we become friends with others or as we welcome people into our home, we receive them with hospitality because God is found in each of them. When we reach out to others or receive them as guests, they in turn enrich and bless our lives. This spiritual practice of hospitality has ancient roots all over the world. It teaches us to relate with generous hospitality to all guests who appear at our door.

Do something generous for someone today.

You are reading from the book:
The More We Find In Each Other by Merle Fossum and Mavis Fossum

MacGyverDel
10-05-2007, 12:49 AM
Have you learned lessons only of those who admired you, and were tender with you, and stood aside for you? Have you not learned great lessons from those who braced themselves against you, and disputed the passage with you?
--Walt Whitman

Wouldn't it be grand if we could have everything our way! We'd have people at our beck and call. We'd never have to take responsibility for ourselves, never have to struggle for anything, and never be refused any wish or want.

But how would we mature? Learning involves gains based on the effort we expend. We learned early that we couldn't listen to a music box unless we wound it. We learned we couldn't get good grades unless we studied. And now we've learned we can't change our behaviors without working the program.

If we can't see the results of the energy we put into things, then our motivation, determination, and confidence can't grow. Some things will come easily, some won't. But the things we work on now will mean the most in the end.

I am not afraid to put energy into something I really want. I need to do this for my self-esteem.

You are reading from the book:
Night Light by Amy E. Dean

gdogg75
10-05-2007, 02:13 AM
Do not dare think for one minute that you are here by your own accord... although you "made the decision" to arrive where you are... you must understand that it is by Divine Appointment that you are here... and that there is much more to your purpose than what you originally thought...God has designed it for you to be here... make sure that you make the best of it all according to his will that was from my father on a sunday morning sermon... in regards to people who "arrived" at church just to "show up"

HC
10-05-2007, 04:18 AM
Have you learned lessons only of those who admired you, and were tender with you, and stood aside for you? Have you not learned great lessons from those who braced themselves against you, and disputed the passage with you?
--Walt Whitman

Wouldn't it be grand if we could have everything our way! We'd have people at our beck and call. We'd never have to take responsibility for ourselves, never have to struggle for anything, and never be refused any wish or want.

But how would we mature? Learning involves gains based on the effort we expend. We learned early that we couldn't listen to a music box unless we wound it. We learned we couldn't get good grades unless we studied. And now we've learned we can't change our behaviors without working the program.

If we can't see the results of the energy we put into things, then our motivation, determination, and confidence can't grow. Some things will come easily, some won't. But the things we work on now will mean the most in the end.

I am not afraid to put energy into something I really want. I need to do this for my self-esteem.

You are reading from the book:
Night Light by Amy E. Dean


Nice - so true - working hard for our goals is trememdously enriching.

I would like to add that sometimes we don't have a choice in learning or working through something - sometimes we are put into situations that are dificult, adverse or even tragic. And I belive it's the way we deal with that adversity and what we learn from it that defines our character - what we are made of...as hard as tragedy and adversity are to get through - working through it can either make us better stronger people or destroy us...much is our choice.

Cheers.

MacGyverDel
10-06-2007, 12:48 AM
I play while I work and I work while I sleep. I depend on the functioning of my subconscious imagination to do my work.
--Edith Shannon

Our minds are never at rest. It's rather nice to know that someplace within we remember everything that caught our attention; even when we weren't conscious of it. Learning to tap into this well of information comes with lots of practice and the willingness to get quiet, really quiet.

It's our attitudes that make play of work. Keeping our thoughts and composure joyful prevents even the dullest task from boring us. Being open to the possibility that fun is an outlook we can foster changes us quite profoundly. It also keeps the channel to our interior imagination uncluttered with the negative. We will always know how to proceed in every instance if we let our inner knowing guide us. The subconscious imagination is never asleep.

My inner self stands at attention always. I will let it answer my questions and make my decisions.

You are reading from the book:
Keepers of the Wisdom by Karen Casey

:)

HC
10-06-2007, 01:53 AM
Del - I really like your posts...thanks :)

MacGyverDel
10-07-2007, 05:26 AM
Live big!
--Brady Michaels

Sometimes, that's the best advice we can hear. Win or lose succeed or fail, go for it, and go all the way. As my flight instructor told me on the first day of flying lessons, "Keep one hand on the throttle and one hand on the yoke." "Aahhhhh!" I would say during my early lessons as the plane lifted into the air, but I kept the throttle pushed all the way in.

There are times when it's wise to be cautious. And there are times when the best thing we can do - the only thing we can do - is go for it by living big. Ask her out. Request the raise. Say no - and mean it. Learn to drive a racecar or climb a tall hill. Learn to snorkel or surf. Dreams remain dreams until you act upon them. Then they become real life.

Will you throw a few coins into the beggar's cup, or will you bring him a hamburger and fries from the local fast-food place? Will you do an average job at work, or will you look for ways to go big - really give it your best - in the everyday areas of your job? Will you put your all - your heart and emotions - into the relationship with the people you love? Will you wait for another, more convenient time to pray, or will you start genuinely trusting God?

You don't have to get a life. You've already got one. Live it, and live big.

God, help me let go of my fear and timidity, and learn to live big.

You are reading from the book:
More Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

MacGyverDel
10-08-2007, 02:37 AM
Believing that we deserve better is the first step.

Some people say there is magic in believing. Our expectations are powerful; they are self-fulfilling, in fact. And if our expectations are generally negative, we'll find the circumstances of our lives pretty dismal too.

The good news is that when we expect better experiences, we'll also find them. How does this work? Surely it requires more than just believing. But it really doesn't. When we look for the good in every situation, we quite selectively see it. Making the choice to live this way means we'll regularly see opportunities for opening doors to better lives.

The formula is simple: Our Higher Power's plan for our lives is always for our benefit. Some part of that plan may be difficult to bear at first, but when we remember to believe that it is a positive opportunity, we'll feel its potential for changing our lives.

I will monitor what I believe about every experience I have today. Looking for opportunities will help me see them.

You are reading from the book:
A Life of My Own by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
10-09-2007, 12:57 AM
He who hesitates is sometimes saved.

Recovery is teaching us to think a situation through to the end before we act. In the past, we often reacted first and thought later. Unable to wait out the pain, we tried to "fix" our problems by artificial means: drugs, alcohol, food, sex, and excitement. Our only goal was to escape and get relief from the ups and downs of life. Rushing from one situation to another, we seldom slowed down enough to relax and really think through the consequences of our actions.

Now, we're learning to solve problems instead of escaping from them. Learning to sit still with discomfort, knowing it will eventually pass, has given us real personal power in our day-to-day living. What a wonderful freedom to no longer be driven by the demons of obsession and compulsion, but instead to experience our feelings as friends instead of enemies. When we allow ourselves to sit with such friends, open to what they can teach us, we will never be alone.

Today let me think difficult situations through to the end before deciding how to act.

You are reading from the book:
Body, Mind, and Spirit by Anonymous

jwdjrs
10-09-2007, 06:10 AM
Good read Del :)

MacGyverDel
10-10-2007, 01:03 AM
;)

Being open

Sometimes we think we're supposed to have more recovery under our belts. Perhaps we feel the need to impress our peers with our success in staying off mind-altering chemicals. But perhaps we are really just trying to convince ourselves. We know how difficult recovery is, and surely our Higher Power is not fooled by our pretense of well being.

If we try to hide our problems, we cannot get help for them. To get help we must tell people where we're really at. No one can read a closed book.

Am I open with others?

Higher Power, help me believe in the saying, "Ask and you shall receive."

You are reading from the book:

Day by Day - Second Edition by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
10-11-2007, 03:17 AM
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

To grasp this program we have to think things out. Saint Paul said, "They are transformed by the renewing of their minds." We have to learn to think straight. We have to change from addictive, obsessive, compulsive thinking to sober, sane, rational thinking. We must build a new way of looking at life. Before we came into this program, we wanted an artificial life of excitement, thrills, and escape - whatever goes with the insanity of our affliction. That kind of life looked normal to us then. But now that life looks the exact opposite of normal. We must re-educate our minds. Am I changing from an abnormal thinker to a normal, rational thinker?

MEDITATION FOR THE DAY

I will live the most crowded day without fear. I believe that God is with me and controlling all. I will let confidence be the motif running through all the crowded day. I will not be worried, because I know that God is my helper. Underneath are the everlasting arms. I will rest in them, even though the day be full of things crowding in upon me.

PRAYER FOR THE DAY

I pray that I may be calm and let nothing upset me. I pray that I may not let material things control me and choke out spiritual things.

You are reading from the book:

Look to this Day by Alan L. Roeck

MacGyverDel
10-12-2007, 12:24 AM
Dealing with Anger

"The most heated bit of letter-writing can be a wonderful safety valve," AA confounder Bill W. said, "providing the wastebasket is somewhere nearby."

This is a delightful bit of advice about the right way to handle anger. Writing an angry letter is at least a way of bringing our feelings out so that we can see them. This is far healthier than the peculiar method of "stuffing" one's feelings and pretending that there was no hurt or offense.

But an angry letter, once mailed, can be more destructive than a bullet. We may live to regret ever having mailed it. It could have unintended consequences of the worst kind.

That's why the wastebasket becomes the second handy way to deal with our anger. We throw the letter away and let time and wisdom heal the matter. What usually happens under the guidance of our Higher Power is that we find a much more satisfactory way of settling whatever has happened.

If I become angry today, I'll admit it to myself. Perhaps I'll even put my feelings on paper. But I'll have the good sense not to go further with such outbursts.

You are reading from the book:

Walk in Dry Places by Mel B.

jwdjrs
10-12-2007, 05:55 AM
;)

Being open

Sometimes we think we're supposed to have more recovery under our belts. Perhaps we feel the need to impress our peers with our success in staying off mind-altering chemicals. But perhaps we are really just trying to convince ourselves. We know how difficult recovery is, and surely our Higher Power is not fooled by our pretense of well being.

If we try to hide our problems, we cannot get help for them. To get help we must tell people where we're really at. No one can read a closed book.

Am I open with others?

Higher Power, help me believe in the saying, "Ask and you shall receive."

You are reading from the book:

Day by Day - Second Edition by AnonymousAlot of truth in this Del :)

MacGyverDel
10-13-2007, 12:59 AM
;)

Time is a dressmaker specializing in alterations.
--Faith Baldwin

We are learning as we go, and the experiences shed light on our own plans for proceeding. The steps we are taking in unison as well as on separate but parallel paths enhance the particular movements of us all.

We often expect perfection from ourselves, forgetting that we're all beginners in life. The best we can do is willingly acknowledge our errors, grateful that we can always begin again on any task - grateful that we have the experiences of others to help guide us.

Life is process. We learn, we grow, share burdens, reformulate ideas, and restructure our values. Every change we make alters the steps we take, altering in turn someone else's movements, too.

You are reading from the book:

The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey and Martha Vanceburg

Mr. Wacko
10-13-2007, 08:09 AM
Del, dunno how I didn't sea this thread...(oh wait, I'm not over 35 ;))... But anyways, true shyt! I'm liking these.. Real words are being spoken here.

MacGyverDel
10-14-2007, 01:34 AM
:)

Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.
--Anonymous

One of the biggest problems of addiction began with the initial desire to increase and continue to use an addictive substance. All of us who have gotten to the point of overdoing the consumption of a substance were basically, in some manner, filling a need to be what we thought was "normal" like other people.

We were convinced we were unworthy, inadequate, afraid, and lonely whenever we compared ourselves to others. We disconnected and isolated ourselves, not only from our peers, but also from our own real selves. We lived in a world of fantasy.

Our problem was more than a physical hunger for the things that made us dependent. It was also not dealing with crazy thinking, self-defeating behavior, and screwed-up emotions.

Today, I'll remember addiction is two-fold: one was my substance use and the other was an irrational thinking problem.

You are reading from the book:

Easy Does It by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
10-15-2007, 12:54 AM
;)

Reflection for the Day

I can attain real dignity, importance and individuality only by a dependence on a Power, which is great and good, beyond anything I can imagine or understand. I will try my utmost to use this Power in making all my decisions. Even though my human mind cannot forecast what the outcome will be, I will try to be confident that whatever comes will be for my ultimate good. Just for today, will I try to live this day only, and not tackle my whole life problem at once?

Today I Pray

May I make no decision; engineer no change in the course of my life stream, without calling upon my Higher Power. May I have faith that God's plan for me is better than any scheme I could devise for myself.

Today I Will Remember

God is the architect. I am the builder.

You are reading from the book:

A Day at a Time (Softcover) by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
10-16-2007, 12:19 AM
Anticipate the good so that you may enjoy it.
--Ethiopian Proverb

Newcomer

I'm getting closer to 90 days - I'm in the 80s now. I'm excited. It's a miracle that I've been able to stay in recovery without interruption for this long. But I feel worried, too - or maybe I'm scared. I don't know what I'm feeling!

Sponsor

"Anniversary anxiety" is something many of us experience in recovery. For the preceding days or weeks, we're aware of the upcoming anniversary and its implications. We may anticipate speaking at a meeting or celebrating with recovering friends. Will we measure up to their expectation? To our own?

Perhaps we've been sharing our day count and enjoying the applause. As we approach 90 days, we may be afraid we'll become "invisible" at meetings. Depending on local program and group customs, we may be eligible to chair meetings. Are we going to have to handle more responsibilities than we feel ready for? The day of the anniversary itself, and the days following it, may be a setup for feeling as if we've graduated or won an athletic event. We may be afraid that recovery will disappoint us, once the cheering dies down.

It helps to know that this phenomenon is a common one. If you're experiencing it, one of the best antidotes is to share your concerns, both at meetings and with a sponsor. We've been there.

Today, I use the same tools of recovery that worked in the very beginning: meetings, sharing, reading recovery literature, and prayer. They work.

You are reading from the book:

If You Want What We Have by Joan Larkin

MacGyverDel
10-17-2007, 01:43 AM
;)

We find that as we become more centered within the Higher Power part of us, our ego becomes less real, less threatening, less compelling.
--Jerry Hirshfield

It's a struggle at times for us to remember that our Higher Power never moves away. God is as close as our breath, awaiting our invitation to take charge. Frequently this strikes us as new information. But each time a friend or a particular reading triggers our recall; we relax, because we know that God is taking over. Once again we trust that all is well.

It's our ego that fights giving up control during the early stages of many of our troubling experiences. We are frustrated again and again as we try to force what we think is the best solution; again and again, in the end, after we've finally given up the struggle. God smoothes the path.

This program guarantees us a smooth trip every step of the way. All we have to do is give up control to God who is always waiting for us to turn our attention from our problems to God's presence.

I will feel peace and joy throughout today because I'll remember my Higher Power presence.

You are reading from the book:

In God's Care by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
10-18-2007, 03:19 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Some of us have an insatiable desire to do something about every situation that occurs in our lives. We fret about this, we rush into that, and we push our confused minds to the edge of despair. Weary from our relentless struggling, we become short-tempered, highly critical, and completely irrational. Little things become big things. Everything in our lives becomes too much for us.

When this happens, we need to ?Let Go," of our false pride, and admit that we alone cannot understand or solve our present difficulties. Only when we have the humility to admit our limitations can we receive the help we need.

Letting go of our false pride, however, is merely the first step. We also need to "Let God" take a hand in our affairs. When we give our burdens to God expecting God's help our problems often solve themselves without our ever making any conscious effort. Leaving our troubles with God frees our minds to receive new perspectives which we could not receive while we were busily clutching our sorrows and frustrations to us.

Today, I will ask for God's guidance and help in every area of my life. I will not try to solve all my difficulties at once. I am not expected to handle more than my share. I will work on one or two things and leave the rest to God.

You are reading from the book:

The Reflecting Pond by Liane Cordes

MacGyverDel
10-19-2007, 12:21 AM
Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the act.
--William James

Step Two speaks of believing. For many years, we had given up believing in ourselves, in a Higher Power, and in others. Now our program tells us to believe in love. We are lovable, and we can love others without hurting them.

Of course, believing is an important part of recovery. To believe means to put aside our doubts. To believe means to have hope. Believing makes the road a little smoother. So, believing lets the healing happen a little faster.

All of this is how we get ready to let in the care of our Higher Power.

Prayer for the Day

I pray for the courage to believe. I'll not let doubt into my heart. I can recover. I can give myself totally to this simple program.

Action for the Day

I'll list four times doubt got in my way. And I'll think of what I can do to not let that happen again.

You are reading from the book:

Keep It Simple by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
10-20-2007, 02:32 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is: :)

A controller doesn't trust his/her ability to live through the pain and chaos of life. There is no life without pain just as there is no art without submitting to chaos.
--Rita Mae Brown

It is very hard for most of us to see how controlling we are. We may feel uptight or careful, but we haven't seen it as controlling ourselves or controlling how people respond to us. We may be worried about a loved one's behavior or safety, but not realize our hovering over that person is a controlling activity. We may be keenly aware of other people's controlling behavior with us, but unaware we have equaled their control by monitoring them and trying to change their behavior.

What a moment of spiritual adventure it is to risk living through the pain! When we do not seek an escape or a quick fix but have patience with the process, new possibilities often do develop. We can only let go of our control - or turn it over to our Higher Power. And we will do it and forget, taking control back within minutes or within an hour. Then we let go again.

Today, I will submit to the insecurity of a changing universe and have faith that I can live through the process and grow.

You are reading from the book:

Touchstones by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
10-21-2007, 02:36 AM
:)
I wish my parents would trust me and understand that I am trying my hardest.
--Anonymous

Parents are hard to understand at times. Sometimes they give double messages. They tell us what is really important is that we try our hardest. Then they seem crushed when we do try our hardest but don't do as well as they expected. We sometimes wish they would stop getting themselves mixed up in us. We don't always want the things they want for us.

We hope our parents know that we're really trying. It's true that we'll make mistakes, but isn't that normal? It might help if we knew more about what it was like for them growing up. Maybe it's time to risk asking them.

Today let me get to know my parents a little better.

You are reading from the book:

Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast

MacGyverDel
10-22-2007, 01:54 AM
Each friend represents a world in us, a world possibly not born until they arrive.
--Anais Nin

We are surrounded by women and men who are necessary for our development. That's a startling revelation perhaps. We don't even like everybody in our life! How can we need them? But we do. Our Higher Power clearly understands our purpose and our needs, and ushers into our lives those people who will help us grow and change and contribute. It sounds mysterious initially, but when we get accustomed to the idea, we are relieved. Each person will teach us something we need to know about life and about ourselves.

Our individual character is growing, changing, maturing. Our understanding of others and our experiences deepens with each unfolding event. The world is ever changing. By design, not coincidence, we will befriend those people who need us, just as we need them.

I am where I need to be. My friends and associates need me as I need them. We are moving and growing in concert.

You are reading from the book:

A Woman's Spirit by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
10-23-2007, 12:11 AM
The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. Let us move forward with a strong and active faith.
-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

When following the inner voice, one must deal with the experience of uncertainty. The future is not laid out and comes down to trust - trusting that the support will be there; that the money will come; that if one path does not work out, another one will open up.

We can develop this trust from experience. We step out in faith the first time, and the Universe supports us. We step out again and the assistance is there. After several experiences, we begin to feel comfortable living by faith - our "invisible means of support." We no longer need to know ahead of time how everything will work out.

So make the decision. Let go of the worry, the anxiety, and the doubt. Have faith in your connection to universal principles, for it is here that your true security lies. The Universe will not abandon you if you maintain your connection to it. Keep the faith, and the faith will keep you.

You are reading from the book:

Listening to Your Inner Voice by Douglas Bloch

;)

MacGyverDel
10-24-2007, 03:50 AM
Coping With Stress

Inevitably, there are times of stress in our lives, no matter how long we've been in recovery.

Sometimes, the stress is outside or around us. We're feeling balanced, but our circumstances are stressful. Sometimes, the stress is within; we feel out of balance. When the stress is external and internal, we experience our most difficult times.

During stressful times, we can rely more heavily on our support systems. Our friends and groups can help us feel more balanced and peaceful in spite of our stressful conditions.

Our most important focus during times of stress is taking care of ourselves. We are better able to cope with the most irregular circumstances; we are better able to be there for others if we're caring for ourselves. We can ask ourselves regularly: What do we need to do to take care of ourselves? What might help us feel better or more comfortable?

Self-care may not come as easily during times of stress. Self-neglect may feel more comfortable. But taking care of us always works.

Today, I will remember that there is no situation that can't be benefited by taking care of myself.

You are reading from the book:

The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

MacGyverDel
10-25-2007, 12:35 AM
It is only with the heart that one can see rightly....
--Antoine de Saint Exupery

If we look at the world through suspicious or angry eyes, we'll find a world that mirrors our expectations - a world where tension will mount, arguments will abound, strife will be present where none need be. However, our experiences in some manner bless us, and we'll recognize that if we'll look upon them with gratitude. Everything in our path is meant for our good and we'll see the good when our hearts act as the eyes for our minds.

When we see with our hearts, our responses to the turmoil around us, the fighting children, the traffic snarls, the angry lovers, will be soft acceptance. When our hearts guide the action we can accept those things we cannot change, and change those we can. And the heart, as the seat of all wisdom, will always know the difference.

You are reading from the book:

Worthy of Love by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
10-26-2007, 02:54 AM
Recovery is civil war, but it is a war that can be won.
--Sister Imelda

How often do we hear people say, "Sure, I know it's the right thing to do - but it's easier said than done!'' But "it," whatever "it" is for each of us, is actually easier done than not done. As hard as it is to turn our will and our behavior toward recovery, failing to recover is much harder. Ultimately, any price we pay for recovery is far less than the cost of giving up everything we've gained.

Some of us have a very difficult time making phone calls. Others are scared to death of speaking at meetings, talking to strangers, or admitting that we have feelings. But the alternative has simply been too painful. Whatever we have to do is worth it. The payoff is immense. How many of us, when we did attend that meeting that frightened us, felt an enormous surge of self-confidence and happiness? How often, when we have stood our ground and found it did not kill us, have we felt that we could lick the world? The payoff is that we learn to like ourselves more, and that is as good as it gets.

I will make sure today that I am not forgetting the benefits of recovery and only considering the price of recovery.

You are reading from the book:

Days of Healing, Days of Joy by Earnie Larsen and Carol Larsen Hegarty

MacGyverDel
10-27-2007, 01:25 AM
Our problem is that we expect to feel secure.

Many of us have had past crises and problems, yet our worries and anxieties continue in the present. We believe that our situation causes our fears and we say, "If only things were different, I could relax." Yet even when everything is going well, we still get anxious that something unseen is amiss. When we are immersed in our fears, unable to let go and live life joyfully, we may become emotionally absent from our loved ones.

Our problem is not that life is insecure. Of course it is. Our problem is that we expect to feel secure. We put great energy into achieving control and having everything "just right," but quite naturally we end up without control. Then we think something is wrong. Instead, we can choose to turn our fears over to our Higher Power. We do that by talking about our fears, taking the steps we can, and trusting our Higher Power for the outcomes. Then we return to emotional contact in our relationship.

Tell your partner something you fear and turn it over to your Higher Power.

You are reading from the book:

The More We Find In Each Other by Merle Fossum and Mavis Fossum

MacGyverDel
10-28-2007, 12:58 AM
Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand.
-- Thomas Carlyle

"Five years down the road," says Jack, "I want to have a new job, an intimate relationship, and a bigger house. I want to be earning more money and feel better about myself." What nice dreams! But what is Jack doing for himself now?

"My relationship is not going well," sighs Sarah. "This isn't the first time I've been told I have the same character defects. Someday I really want to make changes and be in a warm, supportive relationship. Then I'll be happy." But how can Sarah expect to have a wonderful relationship if she doesn't begin her work now?

"My family is so messed up," declares Leslie, a parent. "No one communicates. If we had a bigger house we wouldn't argue so much or be so disorganized. When Bill and I start making good money, we can look for that dream house." But when will Bill and Leslie work on the family problems they're having now?

I can begin to see what lies clearly at hand - not a dream or goal years away from now. All I have is right now. Tonight I can build my future foundations by working on me.

You are reading from the book:

[b]Night Light[b] by Amy E. Dean

MacGyverDel
10-29-2007, 02:09 AM
If you don't have any loyalty to what you are doing, you ought not be doing it.
-- Tom Harding

We understand loyalty to friends and family members, but does loyalty to an activity imply the same thing? To be loyal to an activity means to stick with it even when we hit the inherent snags. Let's consider a hobby for instance. Are we so frustrated when we can't track down a particular stamp or seem unable to complete the 5000 piece puzzle that we consider quitting the activity in disgust? If so, we probably lack the loyalty that Tom alludes to.

Each of us has to consider for ourselves whether or not we value this kind of loyalty when it comes to the "extracurriculars" in our lives. We're not failures if we decide to drop some hobby for another one. Sometimes we can't see that some interest doesn't fit us all that well until we get deep into it. What's more important is that we remain loyal to our values, whatever they are. When some activity loses its appeal, for any reason, and we continue to stay with it out of shame or embarrassment, we're not being loyal to that which is most important -- ourselves.

Today, I'll ask myself if my hobbies suit my true interests.

You are reading from the book:

Keepers of the Wisdom by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
10-30-2007, 01:39 AM
;)

Today I will take it easy.

I will accept that I've made mistakes in the past. I will also accept that I did the best I could.

Maybe I wish I had made different decisions or handled things differently. But wishes don't change the past. I can only begin making changes today. I will accept myself, knowing that I did my best. I did what I thought I had to do.

I am and have always been worthy of being loved the way I want to be loved.

You are reading from the book:

Time to Fly Free by Judith R. Smith

MacGyverDel
10-31-2007, 12:31 AM
It's a simple formula; do your best and somebody might like it.
--Dorothy Baker

We're never guaranteed success by others' standards. However, if we do our best according to the standards we think God has in mind, we'll be successful. And from God we'll always receive unconditional love and acceptance.

In the past many of us were haunted by fears that our best wasn't good enough. And not infrequently those fears hindered our performance, thus validating our fears. We can slip back into those immobilizing fears if we don't attend, with vigilance, to the program and its suggestions.

Our higher power will help us do whatever task lies before us. And no task will be ours except those for which we've been readied. Our job is simply to go forth, taking God as our partner, and set about completing the task. We will not falter if we remember where our strength rests, where the guidance lies.

Self-esteem is one of the byproducts of a job done with God's help. An additional byproduct is that we learn more quickly to rely on God's direction and strength the next time, thus reducing the time we give to fear.

I can be successful today, in every endeavor, if I let God manage my moves.

You are reading from the book:

Each Day a New Beginning by Karen Casey

;)

MacGyverDel
11-01-2007, 02:19 AM
Relaxing when things don't go as you planned.

So, the boyfriend calls, says he's going hiking with his buddies for a week, cancels his date with you and says he hopes you won't be mad.

Or the bank calls and says you're overdrawn, and you don't know how that can be. You've been trying to carefully watch your deposits and checks. You've gone out of your way not to mess up. This can't be right!

What do you do when life seems to force you to react? You can panic, become anxious, yell, and respond with a counterattack. But that probably won't solve the problem. And it may turn things into a brawl.

Or you can calm down. Breathe deeply. Tell yourself to relax. Say as little as possible, if that's possible, while you're upset and disturbed. If a problem or disturbance that's not fair interrupts your life, try responding by saying hmmm. Then calm down and decide what you need to do.

God, help me start sailing through life with more ease by learning to relax and let life be.

You are reading from the book:

More Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

MacGyverDel
11-02-2007, 01:33 AM
:)

Attitude is everything!

Today will be what we make it. Regardless of the weather, the kinds of work to be done, the personalities crossing our paths, we'll feel joy and peace if that is our choice.

Agonizing over circumstances that aren't to our liking or dwelling on our failure to control other people, whether friends or foes, has robbed us of the happiness that is always ours to experience. Depression, anger, fear, and frustration shadowed our steps because we didn't take control of the only thing that's ever been in our control absolutely - attitude.

It's so easy to blame others for every wrinkle in our lives. But as we grow accustomed to the idea of taking full responsibility for how we think and feel, we'll be empowered. No longer will our sense of self feel diminished. And, as Abraham Lincoln is credited with saying, we will be just as happy as we make up our minds to be.

Nobody can mess with my attitude but me!

You are reading from the book:

A Life of My Own by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
11-03-2007, 12:36 AM
In AA the only mistake you can make is not coming back.

Gratitude is the streetcar to a better attitude.

The catch-22 of recovery:
You've got to change your thinking
To change your drinking.
But to change your thinking,
You've got to change your drinking.

AA: Absolute Abstinence.

You are reading from the book:
My Mind Is Out to Get Me
by Dr. Ron B.

MacGyverDel
11-04-2007, 01:59 AM
A.A. Thought for the Day

Strength comes from the fellowship we find when we come into AA. Just being with people who have found the way out gives us a feeling of security. We listen to the speakers and we absorb the atmosphere of confidence and hope that we find in the place. Am I receiving strength from the fellowship with other AA members?

Meditation for the Day

God is with me, to bless and help me. His spirit is all around me. All power is God's. I say that to myself often and steadily. I say that until my heart sings with joy for the safety and personal power that it means to me.

Prayer for the Day

I pray that with strength from God I may lead an abundant life.

You are reading from the book:

Twenty-four Hours a Day for Teens by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-05-2007, 01:05 AM
:o
Trouble is a part of life, and if you don't share it, you don't give the person who loves you a chance to love you enough.
--Dinah Shore

Just as gravity keeps us grounded and connected to the earth, our fellowship keeps us bound to sobriety. The fellowship available to us in our Twelve Step program keeps us in reality. A problem pondered in isolation seems immense; the same problem shared by those who truly understand is manageable. We need other people from the moment we are born. We need to be included, to feel we're a part of something larger than ourselves. Our spirits hunger for contact from others, and thirst for a relationship with God.

Our fellowship is there, a warm, friendly, and accepting family. Our Higher Power loves us. We are not alone, no matter where we travel, no matter how large our problems seem at the moment. Our joys are doubled and our sadness diminished through the sharing of our hearts.

Today help me listen carefully and give as well as take so I may fully experience this gift of fellowship.

You are reading from the book:

Body, Mind, and Spirit
by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-06-2007, 01:30 AM
Doing our best

Perhaps we are saving our best effort for the "big break." When such and such happens, then I'll give it my best shot. What we don't realize, however, is that success comes from doing a lot of little things well. Learning to live means learning to manage all our daily responsibilities.

If we can't keep our clothes clean, take out the garbage, or get up on time, how can we expect to handle promotions, marriages, and crises? Daily effort may seem inconsequential, but our big break is the result of all our todays well lived.

Higher Power, help me take care of each thing as it comes along.

You are reading from the book:

Day by Day - Second Edition by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-07-2007, 02:24 AM
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

I have learned to live one day at a time. I have finally realized the astounding fact that all I have is now. This realization sweeps away all vain regret and makes my thoughts of the future free of terror. Now is mine. I can do with it, as I will, for better or worse. Here is my life - what I do in this moment. The rest of my life is a succession of other "nows." I have this moment by the grace of God, and what I do with it or fail to do will make or break me. Am I aware that my life is now?

MEDITATION FOR THE DAY

We should work at overcoming ourselves, our ego-centeredness and our selfish desires. We can never fully attain unselfishness. But we can come to accept that we are not at the center of the universe, with the world spinning around us. We can at least make the effort to conquer the self-like and seek daily to obtain more and more of this self-conquest.

PRAYER FOR THE DAY

I pray that I may strive to overcome my self-importance. I pray that I may achieve a true perspective of my significance in the world.

You are reading from the book:
Look to this Day by Alan L. Roeck

MacGyverDel
11-08-2007, 03:07 AM
:)

Practicing Serenity

We often urge ourselves to hurry up when there's no good reason for it. At such times, all we really do is create needless tension and anxiety.

The slogan "Easy does it" is our answer to such calls to hurry. The slogan suggests that we simply move into the rhythms of life and "go with the flow."

It's not hurrying but steady effort that finally brings achievement. We've had entirely too much hurry and impatience -- what we really need is confident, persistent effort in the right direction. We should be specially reminded of this when we see anxious, impatient people speeding through traffic only to be forced to wait at traffic lights, risking life and limb to save a few seconds. A good steady pace is what we need, and it will win the game.

I'll be active today, but not overactive. I'll look for rhythm and efficiency in everything I do.

You are reading from the book:

Walk in Dry Places by Mel B.

MacGyverDel
11-09-2007, 12:25 AM
:o

Is there any stab as deep as wondering where and how much you failed those you loved?
--Florida Scott Maxwell

Treating our loved ones as we hope to be treated is our assurance against failing them. And if we listen to our inner voice, we'll never falter in our actions toward others. There is always a right behavior, a thoughtful response, and a respectful posture.

Let us be mindful that we're sharing our experiences with others who need the talents we have to offer. It's not by coincidence but by design that we're given opportunities to treat those close at hand in some manner. We'd do well to let the choice be loving.

How we treat another invites like treatment. Actions from our heart will soften our own struggles. Also, spiteful, critical treatment of others will hamper our steps. We teach others how to treat us by our gestures and words.

The inner voice can be heard if I choose to listen. It will never guide me wrongly.

You are reading from the book:

The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey and Martha Vanceburg

MacGyverDel
11-10-2007, 03:25 AM
Getting angry can sometimes be like leaping into a wonderfully responsive sports car, gunning the motor, taking off at high speed and then discovering the brakes are out of order.
--Maggie Scarf

Anger can multiply our difficulties in many situations. All of us can look back and remember times when we only made our problems worse because we stepped on the gas and lost all ability to use the brakes.

Now we are growing into more adulthood. We are learning to manage our feelings and use them well. This doesn't happen overnight. We would do well to recall how energized we have felt when we let our anger fly and how much we loved that energy at the moment. Only later did we face the damage we caused. Saying we are sorry isn't enough: we must also be willing to take on the harder task of changing our behavior. When we accept that we love the power and the energy of our anger and aggression, we can begin to rein it in and take charge of it rather than be ruled by it.

Today I will not indulge in the pleasure of anger allowed to run wild.

You are reading from the book:

Wisdom to Know by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-11-2007, 04:32 AM
Being present is an expression of love.

When someone we care about is in distress, we may not know what to say. We'd like to make the hurt go away and set everything right, but we feel awkward and powerless.

Sometimes the greatest gift we can give each other is our presence, our attention. As we recover, we become more available emotionally to those we love, less preoccupied with craving and control, and less withdrawn and isolated. Having experienced the healing support of our Twelve Step groups, we can share our strength and hope by simply being there for someone else, whether or not that person is in the program.

We know that each of us must find his or her own answers. There are many times when, much as we'd like to, we can't fix the problems of our friends, children, parents, or other family members. What we can do is show them by our presence that we care and are on their side. We can spend time with them or, if we're geographically separated, we can call or write. And we can be confident that the same Higher Power that supports us is also supporting those we love.

My presence today can make a positive difference to someone dear to me.

You are reading from the book:

Inner Harvest by Elisabeth L

MacGyverDel
11-11-2007, 04:56 AM
Lest We Forget
http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/blessourtroops.jpghttp://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/14520-20remember.jpg

MacGyverDel
11-12-2007, 04:28 AM
When you do all the talking you only learn what you already know.
--Anonymous

One of the secrets for finding answers to any emotional problem is to talk with fellow members we can confide in fully. We don't need to look any farther than our sponsor or the members who are part of our recovery. We quickly find those who always hear with a complete understanding about how we feel.

Such friends are perfect listeners because they have suffered and survived the same types of problems. They are compassionate and sympathetic. They listen to us patiently while we completely describe our emotions. Only then do they share details about how they survived. Just knowing that they understand is comforting to us.

My listeners can't solve my problems for me. But they do show how they used the tools that are available in the Program to work through the same kinds of problems.

You are reading from the book:

Easy Does It by Anonymous

:)

MacGyverDel
11-13-2007, 05:40 AM
Everything is funny as long as it is happening to someone else.
-- Will Rogers

We laugh when others do something silly. We're amused when something funny happens to them. But if the same happens to us and people laugh, we might give them the evil eye.

Yet, when others laugh, it can free us. It frees us to see the world through new eyes. Likewise, when we laugh at ourselves, we're free to see ourselves with new eyes. Instead of trying to be perfect, we accept we're human. To laugh at ourselves is to accept ourselves. There's no room for shame when we laugh. We enjoy ourselves just as we are. Can I accept the fact I'm human and I have limits?

Prayer for the Day

Higher Power, when I refuse to accept that I'm only human, be gentle with me. I know that, when I least expect it, you will remind me that I'm only human.

Action for the Day

I will share with a friend one or two stories about funny mistakes I've made.


You are reading from the book:
Keep It Simple by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-14-2007, 01:45 AM
;)

Bring the body, and the mind will follow.
--Saying heard in meetings

Newcomer

What do people in recovery mean when they say they have "smart feet"?

Sponsor

In recovery, we develop daily habits that we don't question: the habit of attending meetings, the habit of picking up the telephone to call a sponsor or to share with another recovering person, the habit of starting and ending the day with our preferred combination of prayer, literature, and meditation. We do these things whether we feel like doing them or not, and in time they become second nature to us, as automatic as our addictive behavior was in the past. If we don't have to discuss these habits with ourselves, argue about whether or not they'll make us feel better, or question whether we've outgrown them, our burden is lighter.

Once we're at a meeting or sharing with another recovering person or with our Higher Power, the unexpected happens. We're lifted our of the tyranny of addictive thinking, "Smart feet' are feet that carry us to a place we need to be, whether we know it ahead of time or not.

Today, I'm grateful for simple habits that open my heart and mind to recovery.

You are reading from the book:
If You Want What We Have by Joan Larkin

jwdjrs
11-14-2007, 09:04 AM
I Learned To Stop Worrying By Watching My Wife Wash Dishes
By
Reverend William Wood

204 Hurlbert Street, Charlevoix, Michigan

A few years ago, I was suffering intensely from pains in my stomach. I would awaken two or three times each night, unable to sleep because of these terrific pains. I had watched my father die from cancer of the stomach, and I feared that I too had a stomach cancer-or, at least, stomach ulcers. So I went to Byrne's Clinic at Petosky, Michigan, for an examination. Dr. Lilga, a stomach specialist, examined me with a fluoroscope and took an X-ray of my stomach. He gave me medicine to make me sleep and assured me that I had no stomach ulcers or cancer. My stomach pains, he said, were caused by emotional strains. Since I am a minister, one of his first questions was: "Do you have an old crank on your church board?"

He told me what I already knew; I was trying to do too much. In addition to my preaching every Sunday and carrying the burdens of the various activities of the church, I was also chairman of the Red Cross, president of the Kiwanis. I also conducted two or three funerals each week and a number of other activities.

I was working under constant pressure. I could never relax. I was always tense, hurried, and high-strung. I got to the point where I worried about everything. I was living in a constant dither. I was in such pain that I gladly acted on Dr. Lilga's advice. I took Monday off each week, and began eliminating various responsibilities and activities.

One day while cleaning out my desk, I got an idea that proved to be immensely helpful. I was looking over an accumulation of old notes on sermons and other memos on matters that were now past and gone. I crumpled them up one by one and tossed them into the wastebasket. Suddenly I stopped and said to myself: "Bill, why don't you do the same thing with your worries that you are doing with these notes? Why don't you crumple up your worries about yesterday's problems and toss them into the wastebasket?" That one idea gave me immediate inspiration-gave me the feeling of a weight being lifted from my shoulders. From that day to this, I have made it a rule to throw into the wastebasket all the problems that I can no longer do anything about.

Then, one day while wiping the dishes as my wife washed them, I got another idea. My wife was singing as she washed the dishes, and I said to myself: "Look, Bill, how happy your wife is. We have been married eighteen years, and she has been washing dishes all that time. Suppose when we got married she had looked ahead and seen all the dishes she would have to wash during those eighteen years that stretched ahead. That pile of dirty dishes would be bigger than a barn. The very thought of it would have appalled any woman."

Then I said to myself: "The reason my wife doesn't mind washing the dishes is because she washes only one day's dishes at a time." I saw what my trouble was. I was trying to wash today's dishes, yesterday's dishes and dishes that weren't even dirty yet.

I saw how foolishly I was acting. I was standing in the pulpit, Sunday mornings, telling other people how to live, yet, I myself was leading a tense, worried, hurried existence. I felt ashamed of myself.

Worries don't bother me any more now. No more stomach pains. No more insomnia. I now crumple up yesterday's anxieties and toss them into the wastebasket, and I have ceased trying to wash tomorrow's dirty dishes today.

Do you remember a statement quoted earlier in this book? "The load of tomorrow, added to that of yesterday, carried today, makes the strongest falter." ... Why even try it?

MacGyverDel
11-15-2007, 03:34 AM
Thanks Jerry. ;)

MacGyverDel
11-15-2007, 03:35 AM
There is a need to discover that we are capable of solitary joy and having experienced it, know that we have touched the core of self.
--Barbara Lazear Ascher

To be alone with ourselves, undistracted by a friend's voice or TV or a good book, is not all that easy. We discover the joy of being and not always doing, when we make a commitment to go within and seek the support of our Higher Power.

We are nurtured in times of quiet solitude as, little by little, we come to know and love ourselves more. We find lasting joy deep within ourselves rather than in outward success, other people's approval, or mood altering drugs.

Deciding to leave our distractions for even a few moments will take courage; we may fear the unknown, certain that if we really get to know ourselves, we'll discover we're unlovable. Fear of the unknown is natural, but it lessens as we mature in our spiritual life. We are meant to know and love ourselves as we're known and loved by God.

Today I will quietly go within and I will seek the self-assurance and joy that come from God.

You are reading from the book:
In God's Care by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
11-16-2007, 04:12 AM
Today I will practice looking at situations and learning the difference between "taking action" and "letting go." Many times I need to take care of things that seem difficult or overwhelming, and I have to push myself to get them done because I know they are necessary or good for me. This is called taking action.

There are other times when I want things to get done a certain way or in a certain amount of time. These things may not be within my control, and I may feel frustrated that I can't change them when or how I want to. This is when it's important to learn the art of letting go, which is usually harder than taking action.

I will practice taking action when I need to and letting go of the things I have no control over.

You are reading from the book:
Time to Break Free by Judith R. Smith

TheLBM
11-16-2007, 04:13 AM
You think to much :D

MacGyverDel
11-16-2007, 04:31 PM
You think to much :D

:p Nonsense. ;)
But a good reading in the morning can give one a positive outlook on the day. :)


http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/Motivation.jpg

MacGyverDel
11-17-2007, 01:16 AM
Attitudes and Limitations

"My greatest limitations," a member said, "are in my mind. Until I came to this group, I wasn't even aware that many of the negative circumstances in my life were the direct result of my distorted attitudes.

"I brought myself a lot of unnecessary misery by thinking it was my responsibility to manage and direct other people's lives. I believed it was solely up to me to make everyone else happy and secure. So I continually placed everyone else's needs first until I didn't know who I was or what I needed for my own happiness and comfort. It's exhausting and insane to try to second-guess everyone. Not only that, it doesn't give me or anyone else credit fro being able to think, feel, or act for himself."

Today I will not manage or direct other people's lives, nor will I expect any other human being to fill my inner emptiness. I have the dignity, resources, and responsibility to fulfill my own life just as others have theirs. I will find my own sources of comfort, joy, and peace no matter what others do with their lives and free choices.

You are reading from the book:
The Reflecting Pond by Liane Cordes

;)

MacGyverDel
11-18-2007, 12:26 AM
Reflection for the Day

It's time for me to realize that my attitude - toward the life I'm living and the people in it - can have a tangible, measurable and profound effect on what happens to me day by day. If I expect good, then good will surely come to me. And if I try each day to base my attitude and point of view on a sound spiritual foundation, I know it will change all the circumstances of my life for the better, too. Do I accept the fact that I have been given only a daily reprieve that is contingent on the maintenance of my spiritual condition?

Today I Pray

Since my illness was spiritual - as well as physical and emotional - may I mend spiritually through daily communion with God.

Today I Will Remember

To spend a quiet moment with God.

You are reading from the book:
A Day at a Time (Softcover) by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-19-2007, 02:18 AM
When I feed on resentments and anger, I am giving someone else rent-free space in my head.
-Kathy Kendall

Becoming consumed by our emotions is all too familiar. It was a favorite pastime before we got clean and sober, and it still may "own" us. Much to our dismay, sponsors remind us that we're getting a payoff or we wouldn't continue the practice. They also tell us it's never too late to give it up.

We can begin immediately. Let's breathe in the positive. It takes the same effort as dwelling on resentments, and the outcome is so much healthier. Let's bring our blessings to mind first. Breathe in the images of friends and the smiles we share. Breathe in the image of our Higher Power and those comforting arms. Breathe in the bright light of healing that is the program's gift. Breathe in the peace that comes with knowing all is finally well.

Giving our minds over to loving images heals us. The hurts of the past can each us no more if we breathe in the good.

I will breathe in my Higher Power today. I will dwell on the safety and serenity of my journey.

You are reading from the book:
A Woman's Spirit by Karen Casey

;)

kellyfesperman
11-19-2007, 07:45 PM
Thank you for all that you write.
Anything that is not done in moderation can become an addiction.

Even drug free, alcohol free can have addictions.

your writings are so helpful, and so inspiring. I look forward to them.

JUST WANTED TO SAY THANK YOU!!!



Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Even if you understand and follow all of the rules for more effectively engaging manipulators, life with them is not likely to be easy.
--George K. Simon Jr.

Sometimes they want something. Sometimes they want someone to give them something or to feel a particular way. They want power in some way, shape, or form. Manipulators prey on our weak spots.

Obsession and guilt are weapons. Manipulators get us to use these weapons on ourselves.

Sometimes we can disengage from manipulators - walk away, set a clear limit, be done with them. Other times, it's not that easy. We may be at least temporarily stuck with a boss or authority figure that indulges in heavy manipulation. One of our children may be going through a relentlessly manipulative period. We may have a parent whom we care about deeply who has adapted manipulation as a way of life.

Learn how to effectively deal with manipulators. Not everyone means what they say. . . Learn to recognize when others are telling you what they believe you want to hear. Lean to not react, stay clear, practice nonresistance, and stay true to yourself.

Be gentle with yourself if you have a manipulator in your life. You're not responsible for the other person's attempts at manipulation. You're responsible for staying clear.

God, help me let go the weak spots in myself that allow me to fall prey to manipulations. Help me stay clear of guilt and obsession so I can decide what's best for me.

You are reading from the book:
More Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

:)

ArchAngel'73
11-20-2007, 02:22 AM
:p Nonsense. ;)
But a good reading in the morning can give one a positive outlook on the day. :)


http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z291/macgyverdel/Motivation.jpg
Good going Del. Keep it positive no matter what.;)
Keep it up, I don't SEA many replies, but the good word is getting out.:)

MacGyverDel
11-20-2007, 03:42 AM
Thank you for all that you write.
Anything that is not done in moderation can become an addiction.

Even drug free, alcohol free can have addictions.

your writings are so helpful, and so inspiring. I look forward to them.

JUST WANTED TO SAY THANK YOU!!!

You're welcome and I know a number of members who read them regularly.
I only post for them and myself. ;)


Good going Del. Keep it positive no matter what.;)
Keep it up, I don't SEA many replies, but the good word is getting out.:)

Thanks Brian and responses is not an issue. People read them then come back the next day to read the next one ... I hope. ;) A page from different inspirational/meditation books .

Thanks both of you. :)

MacGyverDel
11-20-2007, 03:44 AM
Resolve to be thyself; and know, that he who finds himself, loses his misery.
--Matthew Arnold

We all have known the braggarts, the boastful ones who constantly toot their own horns. These people crave approval because they don't yet approve of themselves. There are those who do the same thing but they're not so noisy about it. The girl who says she's ugly even though she's pretty, or the guy who says he's dumb even though he isn't. These are not humble people. They are people who need to learn to approve of themselves.

We don't have to be either of these people now. We can honestly look at ourselves and see our strengths and weaknesses for what they are. We don't have to put ourselves down today. Best of all, we can now accept compliments graciously.

Today I will make an effort to accept myself.

You are reading from the book:
Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast

MacGyverDel
11-21-2007, 01:29 AM
Self-interest is but the survival of the animal in us. Humanity only begins for man with self-surrender.
--Henri Amiel

When we were lost in our addictive ways, we were driven by self-interest. We didn't necessarily like ourselves or want to be so self-centered. But we had no inner resources to help us escape the trap of our egos. When we were there, we could not see outside ourselves well enough to ask for help. Surrender, we thought, brought only defeat and humiliation.

The inspiration of this program brings us possibilities that cannot originate from within. When we surrender, we are no longer captives within our skins. We are actually restored to a more natural state as people in community with others, who literally cannot survive as isolated individuals. We must be a part of the give and take within the group, just as it has been for human beings since the beginning of time.

Today, I surrender my self-interest again, knowing I must do it over and over.

You are reading from the book:
Touchstones by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-22-2007, 12:39 AM
:o
There is enough in the world for everyone's need, but not enough for everyone's good.
--Frank Buchman

Ours is an illness of more. More! More! More! The greed of addiction decays the soul and leaves us to desperately try to fill the hole that is left behind, but there is never enough. The greed of addiction also keeps us running from the responsibility of a relationship with our Higher Power. Over time we're left with great spiritual pain. Recovery asks us to replace greed with gratitude. If we are sober today, that is enough. We should be grateful. If we can make one person smile today, that is enough. We should be grateful. If we have a place to rest our head and food to nourish our body, that is enough. We should be grateful. As our needs are met, we give thanks instead of demanding more.

Prayer For The Day

Higher Power help me become a person who is thankful for the gift of life and sobriety. Help me give thanks for the challenges as well as the easy times. Help me to see that I am enough.

Today's Action

Today I will make a list of all the things for which I as grateful. I will give thanks to my Higher Power, especially for my sobriety.

You are reading from the book:
God Grant Me... by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
11-23-2007, 01:05 AM
Letting Go of Worry

What if we knew for certain that everything we're worried about today will work out fine?

What if . . . we had a guarantee that the problem bothering us would be worked out in the most perfect way, and at the best possible time? Furthermore, what if we knew that three years from now we'd be grateful for that problem, and its solution?

What if . . . we knew that even our worst fear would work out for the best?

What if . . . we had a guarantee that everything that's happening, and has happened, in our life was meant to be, planned just for us, and in our best interest?

What if . . . we had a guarantee that the people we love are experiencing exactly what they need in order to become who they're intended to become? Further, what if we had a guarantee that others can be responsible for themselves, and we don't have to control or take responsibility for them?

What if . . . we knew the future was going to be good, and we would have an abundance of resources and guidance to handle whatever comes our way?

What if . . . we knew everything was okay, and we didn't have to worry about a thing? What would we do then?

We'd be free to let go and enjoy life.

Today, I will know that I don't have to worry about anything. If I do worry, I will do it with the understanding that I am choosing to worry, and it is not necessary.


You are reading from the book:
The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

MacGyverDel
11-24-2007, 12:57 AM
Do your best and leave to God the rest.
-- Proverb

Turning It Over

There comes a time in facing a challenge when we have done all that we can, and still the situation remains unresolved. This is the time to turn the problem over and release our cares into the hands of spirit. When we let the Universe take charge, anything becomes possible. God can do for us what we could not do for ourselves.

If you find that you have reached such an impasse, try the following; in your mind's eye place the problem upon an imaginary alter. Then say, "I turn this over to you, spirit. From now on, you are in charge." As you walk away from knowing that all is in Divine hands.

Despairing of ever getting published, a young writer used this approach. He placed his manuscript on his inner alter and moved on to another project. Two weeks later, the book was accepted by a major publisher fro a substantial advance. Turning to his agent he said, "I want to thank whoever is responsible, because it certainly wasn't me."

It is good to realize that we do not have to do everything alone.
Help is available. Invisible hands come to support us at the right time.

You are reading from the book:
Listening to Your Inner Voice by Douglas Bloch

jwdjrs
11-24-2007, 09:48 AM
Keep up the good work Del

MacGyverDel
11-25-2007, 12:08 AM
In real love you want the other person's good. In romantic love, you want the other person.
--Margaret Anderson

The expression of real love is so easy between grandparents and children - and between good friends it passes effortlessly. But why is it so hard to share real love with a spouse or lover? Why, instead, do we want to possess them? And from them we dream of selfless devotion. Yet neither possession nor devotion guarantees the security we long for.

Real love is not selfish; it frees both the giver and the receiver. Knowing we're loved sustains our hearts and diminishes our difficulties. It doesn't bind us, yet paradoxically it bonds our hearts. These encouragements to grow, to change, to dare to depart if it's for our own good, are expressions of real love. Real love is never ownership, only stewardship of this moment's experiences.

Let's be gentle with one another, and love fully with trust, as a child loves a grandmother.

You are reading from the book:
Worthy of Love by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
11-26-2007, 01:01 AM
Today's thoughts from Hazelden are:

All the Good I Can

Dear God, guide me to
Do all the good I can
By all means I can
In all ways I can
In all places I can
To all people I can
As long as I can.

You are reading from the book:

The 12 Step Prayer Book Volume 2
by Bill P. and Lisa D.

MacGyverDel
11-27-2007, 12:40 AM
Anger helps straighten out a problem like a fan helps straighten out a pile of papers.
--Susan Marcotte

Some of us have temper tantrums. Like black clouds, we threaten an outburst at any moment. Other people learn to check us out for storm warnings. They want time to clear out or at least to put on a protective covering. We've caught them by surprise before, and they didn't like it. Now they've learned to watch out - to stay on their toes when we're around. Intimidating people, making them glad when we're not around so they can relax, is a poor way to relate to others.

And what do the outbursts do for us? Is there a cheap sense of power or control for a few minutes? Are we advertising to the world that we're short on coping skills? Or do we tell ourselves that letting off steam is necessary once in a while, conveniently forgetting the steam blasting in other people's faces?

No tirade ever solved a problem. Anger is not a strategy. We don't have the right to rain on other people's parades. Our program can teach us better ways to deal with our anger - with honesty and fairness to ourselves and others.

Today, I ask my Higher Power for a peaceful and honest heart.

You are reading from the book:
Days of Healing, Days of Joyby Earnie Larsen and Carol Larsen Hegarty

MacGyverDel
11-28-2007, 12:24 AM
:o

Change

A problem can ultimately bring us a gift.

We start our relationship in excitement, hope, and good feelings, with perhaps a measure of fear mixed in. Our history is yet to evolve. A beginning is more a time of romance than reality. But no lasting connection is built on a steady string of good times. Relationships deepen the way individuals do - by meeting the hard times, not accepting defeat, and using difficulty to learn and grow. That is how a problem, something we do not want or choose in our lives, can ultimately bring us a gift.

One year the biggest problem a couple dealt with was illness, another year it was a financial pinch, and another year almost everything came easily. Each situation called for new responses from within, yet for the same spiritual attitude of living one day at a time. Looking back, they appreciate the richness of their lives together because they have risen above their problems, grown from them, and had many times of fun and pleasure. Their problems were hard but built their relationship.

You are reading from the book:
The More We Find In Each Other by Merle Fossum and Mavis Fossum

MacGyverDel
11-29-2007, 02:53 AM
Today's thoughts from Hazelden are:

F.I.N.E.
[I'm] Frustrated, Insecure, Neurotic, Emotional

F.E.A.R.
Face Everything And Recover

N.U.T.S.
Not Using The Steps

E.G.O.
Edging God Out.

D.E.N.I.A.L.
Don't Even Notice I Am Lying.

H.A.L.T.
[Don't get too] Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired.

H.O.P.E.
Happy Our Program Exists

H.O.W.
Honesty, Open-mindedness, Willingness

S.P.O.N.S.O.R.
Sober Person Offering Newcomers Suggestions On Recovery.

G.O.D.
Good Orderly Direction

B.I.G. B.O.O.K.
Believing In God Beats Our Old Knowledge.

S.L.I.P.
Sobriety Losing Its Priority.

A.C.T.I.O.N.
Any Change To Improve Our Nature.

P.R.O.G.R.A.M.
People Relying On God Relaying A Message.

S.T.E.P.S.
Solutions To Every Problem Sober

K.I.S.S.
Keep It Simple, Sweetheart

You are reading from the book:

Keep Coming Back Gift Book by Meiji Stewart

MacGyverDel
11-30-2007, 12:49 AM
Be aware of yourself and validate your experience. Pay attention to your world, to what's happening, and why. . . . Feel your strength. Value it, and use it.
--Alexandra G. Kaplan

To truly exist in the here and now, we need to feel ourselves in the present. We need to enter each moment without the excess baggage of the past, nor the anticipation of the future.

How do we think or feel in the present? Take away thoughts of other times and we may feel lost and confused. It takes time to learn to live in the present and to trust it. We need to learn that, for as long as we're in the present, we exist. We are.

Imagine the moment as a brand new car. All we need to do is open the door, hop in, and drive away. For that moment, our thoughts will not be focused on cars we used to own or on those we're going to buy in the future. Instead, for that moment, we are in the here and now. That's how each of our moments can be: fresh and clean and exciting.

I can sit in the driver's seat and experience each moment as it occurs. Therein lies my strength.

You are reading from the book:
Night Light by Amy E. Dean

;)

srothu
11-30-2007, 07:24 AM
N.U.T.S.
Not Using The Steps

D.E.N.I.A.L.
Don't Even Notice I Am Lying.

H.O.P.E.
Happy Our Program Exists

S.P.O.N.S.O.R.
Sober Person Offering Newcomers Suggestions On Recovery.

B.I.G. B.O.O.K.
Believing In God Beats Our Old Knowledge.

A.C.T.I.O.N.
Any Change To Improve Our Nature.

P.R.O.G.R.A.M.
People Relying On God Relaying A Message.

S.T.E.P.S.
Solutions To Every Problem Sober



I haven't heard these before! I'll have to pass along to some of my and "Bill's" friends.

Thanks.

MacGyverDel
12-01-2007, 02:59 AM
I haven't heard these before! I'll have to pass along to some of my and "Bill's" friends.

Thanks.

Indeed I was unfamiliar with many myself. :o
I have a few books that I've collected over the years, mostly the first couple yrs of being a friend of Bill.

One is As Bill Sees It that I was thinking of taking an excerpt from each morn and adding to the Thought For The Day.

So expect to sea that in the next couple days. ;)

MacGyverDel
12-01-2007, 03:01 AM
I don't do what I do just so people will think kindly of me. I like doing what I do.
--Janice Clark

We're lucky if we like everything that we do. But many of us have to develop a willingness to like many of the activities we're involved in. Is that unusual? Probably not. Nor does it matter. Acting as if we enjoy a menial task or an unusual pursuit offers us a different perspective on it. Just looking at it through more willing eyes changes not just how we see it, but how we feel about it. Often we discover that we can enjoy that which we dreaded before.

Because we wanted to be liked, and it's human nature to want that, we often volunteered for committees, for jobs, for assignments of all kinds that we didn't want to do. There's no shame in that. But at long last, we can dare to be more selective about what we'll do.

We are needed. That's why we're still alive. And while not everybody likes us, those currently in our circle of acquaintances need us and we need them. The work that is yet to be done relies on all of us. Pitching in begins to feel good when we have the right attitude.

I don't have to like everything I need to do today, but I'll feel more open to all the tasks if I remember they need my input.

You are reading from the book:
Keepers of the Wisdom by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
12-02-2007, 02:49 AM
Today I will surrender to that which I cannot control.

Surrender does not mean giving up when I need to be persistent; it means letting go of that which I can't change. Surrender doesn't mean I stop trying; it means I try, and then I surrender to the outcome.

If I need to find a place to live, I can look in the paper, on the Internet, in rental or real estate publications. I can ask friends or drive around and look. I can fill out applications, make a good impression, and follow up with phone calls. I can think positively by getting ready to move, asking friends to help, fixing up the place that I'm leaving or imagining where I will put my furniture in a new place. But I will surrender to the outcome by not calling the landlord or real estate again and again. I will not repeatedly drive by the place where I hope to live or stop my search when I find a place I like. I will do my part and then surrender to the rest. I can believe and trust that whatever happens is for the best.

What I think I want for myself - and what I may try to force - may not ultimately be in my best interest. I will let go of constantly thinking about and analyzing the situation, and I will surrender to whatever happens, no matter how long it takes.

You are reading from the book:
Time to Fly Free by Judith R. Smith


:)

MacGyverDel
12-03-2007, 01:05 AM
Help is available - we don't have to go it alone.

Together we can do it - we can recover. Disorders are habits of loneliness and isolation. To get well we need help, and that help is always available.

Those of us who belong to a Twelve Step support group have a list of phone numbers. We know we can call people who will be there for us. We go to meetings and share. We find that other people have similar problems, and we stop feeling lonely and isolated.

Some of us are in therapy, some of us have strong family support systems, and some of us have friends and colleagues we can talk to when the going gets rough.

We can get help through our spiritual center. We may define it in various ways, but when we become aware of this center, we have an ever-present source of support.

I will spend some quiet time today paying attention to the help that comes from my spiritual center.

You are reading from the book:
Inner Harvest by Elisabeth L.

:)

MacGyverDel
12-04-2007, 12:09 AM
Even though I can't solve your problems, I will be there as your sounding board whenever you need me.
--Sandra K. Lamberson

The prize we each have been given is our ability to offer full and interested attention to people seeking our counsel. And seldom does a day pass that we aren't given the opportunity to listen, to nurture, to offer hope where it's been dashed.

We are not separate, one from another. Interdependence is our blessing; however, we fail to recognize it at our crucial crossroads. Alone we ponder. Around us, others, too, are often suffering in silence. These Steps that guide our lives push us to break the silence. The secrets we keep, keep us from the health we deserve.

Our emotional well-being is enhanced each time we share ourselves - our stories or our attentive ears. We need to be a part of someone else's pain and growth in order to make use of the pain that we have grown beyond. Pain has its purpose in our lives. And in the lives of our friends, too. It's our connection to one another, the bridge that closes the gap.

We dread our pain. We hate the suffering our friends must withstand. But each of us gains when we accept these challenges as our invitations for growth and closeness to others.

Secrets keep us sick. I will listen and share and be well.

You are reading from the book:
Each Day a New Beginning by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
12-05-2007, 02:00 AM
Listening well

Learning to really listen to another human being - beyond just his or her words - is critical to good communication. Valuable exchanges between human beings can occur only when each listens carefully to the other and tries sincerely to understand the other person's meaning. Much anger and frustration with others could be avoided if we truly understood one another.

Constant thoughts running through our minds is a form of talking, and we can't listen to another (including our Higher Power) if we are still talking.

Do I really listen?

Higher Power, help me be quiet enough within to listen to others today. By trying to understand another, let me learn something about myself.


You are reading from the book:
Day by Day - Second Edition by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
12-06-2007, 02:21 AM
Program friendships are special

Until we came into the program we may have thought that friendships were all alike. We counted on friends to socialize and gossip with, maybe to share a secret with. But when we were really scared about our lives and the future, we felt too vulnerable to let anyone else know our innermost thoughts.

What relief the program has brought us and what good friends! No problem seems as terrifying now that we are no longer shouldering it alone. Having to make a decision no longer overwhelms us when we have other people to discuss it with. Letting ourselves be deeply cared for, with all our faults, is a new experience too. All these gifts come automatically to us within the fellowship. All that is asked of us is that we be a friend too.

I will extend my heart in friendship today, and my concerns will be lightened.

You are reading from the book:
A Life of My Own by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
12-07-2007, 12:15 AM
..All things... that men should do to you, do ye even so to them.
--Matthew 7:12

In the midst of active addiction, the drug dictates how we relate to others: on good days, overly cautious, boastful, and effusive; on bad days, nasty, negative, rude, sometimes cruel. Recovery means being aware that others are affected by our behavior. And that only abstinence grants us the freedom to choose our actions.

When we first go into recovery, we are terrified by the openness we feel emotionally. We often feel wide open to others. We don't have the drugs to hide behind. We don't have a way to manipulate our moods and to make sure we are acting in the "right" manner. It is a new feeling, and often frightening, to realize that our moods have been so manipulated by our using.

But as our spiritual life grows, we find a new peace. We learn to trust ourselves and others in a new way. With the help of our Higher Power and others in recovery, we become confident that our love and good intentions are lasting. Our love, joy, and sharing are beginning to seem real, and straight from the heart. Soon, we will feel proud of the way we treat others.

Today give me the courage to treat other people the way I would like to be treated.

You are reading from the book:
Body, Mind, and Spirit by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
12-08-2007, 01:47 AM
One day at a time.

*****
You've got to give time, time.

*****
Insanity:
Doing exactly the same thing over and over,
expecting different results.

*****
The Serenity Prayer is the handrail to grab
until you can work the Steps.

You are reading from the book:

My Mind Is Out to Get Me by Dr. Ron B.

MacGyverDel
12-09-2007, 04:06 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

I walked out the bakery door holding my crescent and coffee. I looked down. On the sidewalk lay a large dog. He was on his back, motionless. A crowd of people was gathering around and staring.

"Oh my God," I said. A man walked up to me. "What's the matter?" he asked. "Haven't you ever seen a dead dog before?"

I was horrified. Then I saw the glimmer of a smile on the man's face. I looked more closely. This is Los Angeles. Even dogs want to be actors. He had told the dog to play dead instead of sit while he was in the bakery. I chuckled and then walked to my car.

I first learned about the value of laughter the year after I got out of treatment. I began working for a law firm in a small town. I was so frightened - of life, of myself, of whether I could stay sober. I was all bound up inside of myself. I worked alongside a woman in her later twenties, a paralegal in the firm. Often our tasks consisted of rather repetitive, unexciting chores. This was in the old days, before computers. Wills had to be typed perfectly; we couldn't use correction fluid or erasers. It wasn't uncommon to get to the last line of the page and make a mistake.

What I remember most about working with this woman was her ability to laugh at herself, at her tasks, at the sometimes gruesome and boring nature of life. To this day, I don't think she knows how much she affected me and how much she taught me. She taught me to laugh.

Laughter takes the pressure off and lightens the load. We can actually feel our body and our chemistry change when the corners of the mouth turn upward toward the heavens in a smile.


You are reading from the book:

52 Weeks of Conscious Contact by Melody Beattie

MacGyverDel
12-10-2007, 03:06 AM
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

At first we got a kind of boost from our affliction, before we were overwhelmed by it. For a while the world seemed to look brighter, more exciting. But how about the letdown, the painful aftermath? In this program we get a real boost, not a false feeling of exhilaration but a genuine feeling of satisfaction with ourselves and a new self-respect. And we have a feeling of friendliness toward the world that is not like the sick pleasures of before. Then we thought that we were happy, but it was an illusion. Am I getting real pleasure and serenity from this program?

MEDITATION FOR THE DAY

I will practice love, because lack of love will block the way. I will try to see good in all others, those I like and also those who bother me. They are all children of God. If I don't give love, how can I dwell in God's spirit, from which nothing unloving can come? I will try to get along with all people, because the more love I give away, the more I will have.

PRAYER FOR THE DAY

I pray that I may do all I can to love others, in spite of their faults. I pray that as I love so will I be loved.

You are reading from the book:

Look to this Day by Alan L. Roeck

MacGyverDel
12-11-2007, 03:35 AM
Self-esteem comes from doing esteemable acts.

I once had a beautiful plant. It sat on my dining room table for three weeks as I waited for it to blossom. Each week, I waited for something to happen. By week three, instead of a luscious blooming bush, what revealed itself was a dry, shriveled piece of nothing.

I stormed angrily into the florist's shop and demanded an explanation for why my plant had died. Puzzled, yet relatively calm, the florist asked, "Did you do everything, I told you to do?"

"Absolutely! I waited for three weeks just like you said. I just waited, and now my plant is dead."

Scratching his head in wonderment, he asked, "Did you also water the plant every three days? Did you feed it the plant food I gave you? Did you keep it out of direct sunlight? Tell me, what did you do?"

"I didn't water it, because it didn't look like it needed it. I lost the food you gave me, and I didn't have time to get more. And I thought you said to keep it in direct sunlight. I waited for three weeks before calling you because I figured it would be okay, I thought if I let go and let God, the plant would eventually bloom."

How easy it is to mistakenly believe that "let go and let God," means to sit back and do nothing. Our words may not speak it, but our behavior says, "If we just wait, God will provide and good things will happen without our having to do anything."

When we're disrespectful of others, it is easy to think that our behavior is an indication of power and self-esteem. On the contrary it suggests that we care little about ourselves, because we care little about others, For years, I had many excuses for bad behavior: My behavior at the florist's shop was inappropriate. That was no way to speak to anyone. Eventually I went back and made amends for how I spoke to the florist. Self-esteem comes from doing esteemable acts.

;)

You are reading from the book:

52 Weeks of Esteemable Acts by Francine Ward

MacGyverDel
12-12-2007, 03:13 AM
Fear is only an illusion.
It is the illusion that creates the feeling of separateness - the false sense of isolation that exists only in your imagination.
--Jeraldine Sounders

We are only alone in our minds. In reality, we are each contributing and necessary parts offering completion to the wholeness of the universe. Our very existence guarantees our equality, which, when fully understood, eases our fears. We have no reason to fear one another's presence, or to fear new situations when we realize that all of us are on equal footing. No one's talents are of greater value than our own, and each of us is talented in ways exactly appropriate to our circumstances.

Freedom from fear is a decision we can choose to make at any time. We can simply give it up and replace it with our understanding of equality with all persons. Taking responsibility for our fear, or our freedom from it, is the first step to a perspective promising healthier emotional development.

If I am fearful today, it's because I have forgotten the reality of my existence. I am equal to all the people in my world, and we are necessary to one another.


You are reading from the book:

The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey and Martha Vanceburg

;)

MacGyverDel
12-13-2007, 03:28 AM
Living in the Present

One day at a time,
This is enough.
Do not look back and grieve over the past.
For it is gone. . .
And do not be troubled about the future.
For it has not yet come.
Live in the present, and make it so beautiful.
That it will be worth remembering.


You are reading from the book:

The 12 Step Prayer Book Volume 2
by Bill P. and Lisa D.

MacGyverDel
12-14-2007, 03:26 AM
If you go around thinking you are being cheated,
life becomes very unpleasant.
--Felix Salten

Sometimes we feel cheated that we have been given this darn disease to cope with. Why us? Why can't we just be like normal people? Why did we have to get into so much trouble and pain as a result of a disease that hit us and skipped over other people?

Another way to look at it is: Hey, I'm really lucky. I have a killer disease, and I'm beating the odds. I'm getting healthier every day. I got my life back.

Another way to look at it is:
At least this is a disease I can recover from.

The Big Book Promises (on pages 83 and 84) say that any feeling of self-pity will disappear by the time we are working Step Nine. We may even be grateful for the path that led us to recovery. Do we believe it? There's one way to find out: We need to try it.

Prayer for the Day

Higher Power, help me to remember that there are a lot worse things in life than being in recovery.

Today's Action

What are five good things that I have gotten from recovery? Ten? I will write these down and refer to them when I'm tempted to feel sorry for myself.



You are reading from the book:

God Grant Me... by Anonymous

srothu
12-14-2007, 08:38 AM
Keep on posting, Del! It's good to be able to grab a little inspiration after the perspiration. Thanks.

MacGyverDel
12-15-2007, 12:27 AM
The gifts we receive are meant to be shared.

Thanks to the progress I am making in recovery, I like to think I am more loving, more open, more spontaneous, more confident. I believe these gifts have come to me through my Higher Power, the Twelve Steps, and the friends who have helped me grow.

If I am to keep the gifts, I must share them. They are mine as long as I give them away. To do that I need to realize we're all working toward a similar goal: that of developing our potential and becoming who we are meant to be. We help each other toward this goal by sharing our experience, strength, and hope.

Close, warm, loving contacts with my family and friends are what feed my heart and spirit and fill the inner emptiness. When I am willing to share the gifts I have received, I always have enough, because what I give comes back to me.

I will take advantage of today's opportunities for caring and sharing, remembering that my recovery depends not on what I have but on what I give.


You are reading from the book:

Inner Harvest by Elisabeth L.

MacGyverDel
12-16-2007, 12:41 AM
I'm slipping when I begin to dislike the company and conversation of the Program.
--Anonymous

There is a reason why a lamb gets separated from a flock. The flock will be eating on a particular pasture and a lamb will take a fancy to graze just off to the edge of the field. So the lamb takes a little nibble of this grass. Then he moves just ever so slightly further from the edge and takes another little nibble, then just a bit further and another nibble.

Each little nibble of grass takes the lamb further and further from the flock. After awhile, having eaten enough grass, the lamb pokes his head up and notices that the flock has left him. B-A-A-A-A-A! the lamb wails. How could his flock have left him?

I will begin slipping when I stop paying attention to my flock. My group will not leave me: I will leave my group. I will leave like the lamb, just one conversation, and one meeting at a time. After awhile I, too, could end up wailing for help just like the little lamb.


You are reading from the book:

Easy Does It by Anonymous

britonarius
12-16-2007, 06:56 AM
a useful collection - del - that should serve to remind us all of why we are here. keep up the good work - the mental growth is as important as the physical.

MacGyverDel
12-17-2007, 02:30 AM
Reflection for the Day

Someone once defined the ego as "the sum total of false ideas about myself." Persistent reworking of the Twelve Steps enables me to gradually strip away my false ideas about myself. This permits nearly imperceptible but steady growth in my understanding of the truth about myself. And this, in turn, leads to a growing understanding of God and other human beings. Do I strive for self-honesty, promptly admitting when I'm wrong?

Today I Pray

God, teach me understanding; teach me to know truth when I meet it; teach me the importance of self-honesty, so that I may be able to say, sincerely, "I was wrong," along with, "I am sorry." Teach me that there is such a thing as a "healthy ego" which does not require that feelings be medicated by mood-alterers. May I slowly, on my tightrope, move toward the ideal of balance, so I can do away with the nets of falsehood and compulsion.

Today I Will Remember

To keep my balance.


You are reading from the book:

A Day at a Time (Softcover) by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
12-18-2007, 03:46 AM
I can find no serenity until I accept that person, place, thing, or situation as being exactly the way it is supposed to be at this moment.
--Alcoholics Anonymous (The AA Big Book)

Newcomer

Nothing much seems to have changed for me lately. I still have the same problems and issues I had months ago.

Sponsor

The Serenity Prayer asks me "to accept the things I cannot change." I used to think that meant things were never going to change - and that I'd better accept it! Now I realize not only that everything is capable of being changed, but also that change is a fact of reality and I can't stop it. What the phrase "to accept the things I cannot change" means to me today is that there are many things that only my Higher Power can change. That doesn't mean things won't change, only that I can't force them to. I have the courage to do my part; I have faith that change takes place in my Higher Power's time.

I can't be sure I'm going to be offered a particular job; but I can shower, dress appropriately, show up for the interview on time, and represent my capabilities with honesty and dignity. If I'm persistent in these efforts, the right job will come in time. Or perhaps I'd like my weight to change. I can't control the numbers on my scale, but if I exercise and eat moderately, over time a moderate body will show up.

Our Higher Power's timetable often differs from our own; accepting that is a source of serenity.

Today, I let my Higher Power work in my life. I have the courage to have faith.


You are reading from the book:

If You Want What We Have by Joan Larkin

MacGyverDel
12-19-2007, 03:00 AM
To give and to receive are one in truth.
--A Course in Miracles

Giving our love away, honoring someone in need by giving our full attention, will usually bring kindness and concern in return. And unkindness and neglect on our part are likely to result in the same from others. We will usually elicit that which we've so thoughtfully or thoughtlessly given.

Not many elements in our life are so fully in our control as how we choose to treat other people. There are few among us who aren't moved by another's expression of pure, unconditional love. We are humbled by it and feel valued. We can honor the existence of our fellow travelers by our open, willing love for them too.

We need to feel appreciated. And yet, to express appreciation is such a simple act, one that has profound effects for all concerned. Acts of kindness multiply very quickly; we contribute to a world favoring our true humanity when we give out loving thoughts even as we receive them.

[b]I will extend the hand of love to a friend today and thus help to make a better world.


You are reading from the book:

In God's Care by Karen Casey

misstransformer
12-19-2007, 11:52 AM
Thanks for sharing these inspirational thoughts. I especially liked the entries for December 12 and 15th entitled: Fear is only an illusion, and Gifts are meant to be shared entries. :) Blessings, Miss T

britonarius
12-19-2007, 12:08 PM
you are a man of many gifts del - particularly thought provoking - keep it up!

MacGyverDel
12-20-2007, 02:00 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

Some days my life feels so confusing and overwhelming that I think I'll scream.

Sometimes life is like moving from one place to another. When I move into a new house, it is unorganized and chaotic until everything gets put in the right place. In life, my emotions and thoughts are often like the new house full of boxes. I am learning how to unpack one emotional "box" at a time, throw out what I no longer need, and put what I do need in its proper place. It's a hard job, but it's all part of the process of taking back my life.

When my emotional work gets too hectic, I will remember to keep things simple, to deal with one "box" at a time. Eventually, I'll get through the craziness, and everything will be in its rightful place.


You are reading from the book:

Time to Break Free by Judith R. Smith

MacGyverDel
12-21-2007, 03:05 AM
Worry and Stress

:o

"I'm learning it's what I do with my today that counts," said one group member. "I can make this a day to remember or a day to regret just by the kinds of thoughts I have about it.

"Let me explain what happened to make me realize this," he continued. "Two days ago, I woke up grumbling about my sorry lot in life. My divorce, my bills, and a recent argument with a close friend haunted me. Throughout the whole day I nursed my woes and convinced myself that this was just another rotten day. And do you know what? That's exactly what it turned out to be! Nothing went right. I even had a second argument with another friend who called to cheer me up.

"Yesterday, I overheard someone say that a person is made or unmade by what he thinks. I thought about this for a while and decided to try it out today. Instead of greeting the day with my usual, 'Good God, morning!' I consciously said, 'Good morning, God!' with the expectation that it would be a good day. And that's what it's been. I even called my two friends to apologize for my previous terrible mood, and I had a warm and friendly conversation with them both!"

TODAY I will lift up my thoughts. In expecting nothing but good to come to me, that is exactly what I will receive.


You are reading from the book:

The Reflecting Pond by Liane Cordes

britonarius
12-21-2007, 06:21 AM
del - many many years ago [ for i am an old dog older even than the sea ] in a younger form ; i was a rather unpleasant man and having noone and nothing taught me to appreciate what i had. i make it my goal everyday to be kind and to treat others as i would wish to be treated. your thoughts help me remember why i came to be the man i am and serve to show me that in this world of increasing incivility that others do view and treat the world the same as i do. ps nobody say that that was a load to hold back.

MacGyverDel
12-21-2007, 06:58 AM
del - many many years ago [ for i am an old dog older even than the sea ] in a younger form ; i was a rather unpleasant man and having noone and nothing taught me to appreciate what i had. i make it my goal everyday to be kind and to treat others as i would wish to be treated. your thoughts help me remember why i came to be the man i am and serve to show me that in this world of increasing incivility that others do view and treat the world the same as i do. ps nobody say that that was a load to hold back.

Thank you kindly for that Jack and everyone else who can take something from this thread. ;)

I started it for selfish reasons; to remind me daily of where I've been, where I am now and where I want to be in the future.

I am happy it may help others in it's/their own way. :)

MacGyverDel
12-22-2007, 04:30 AM
God is not a cosmic bellboy.
--Harry Emerson Fosdick

We have to laugh when we look back at the times we treated God like our servant. Who did we think we were, ordering God to do something for us? But we got away with it. God even did some of the things we asked.

Now we know that our Higher Power is not a servant. As we work the Steps, we know we don't give orders to our Higher Power. We don't expect God to work miracles every time we'd like one. We're asking our Higher Power to lead us. After all, who knows what is best for us - our Higher Power or us?

Our Higher Power has many wonderful gifts for us. Our Higher Power will show us goals, help us live in love and joy, and give us strength.

Prayer for the Day

Higher Power, show me ways to help others as You've helped me. I'm grateful that You love me and help me.

Action for the Day

Today, I'll make a list of times my Higher Power has helped me out of trouble.


You are reading from the book:

Keep It Simple by Anonymous

:o

MacGyverDel
12-23-2007, 01:24 AM
Each of my days are miracles. I won't waste my day; I won't throw away a miracle.
-- Kelley Vickstrom

It's so easy to forget to be grateful for our many blessings. We may take our freedom from the compulsion to drink or use for granted. Having learned to monitor our behaviour and change it when necessary, we seldom treasure this skill as an asset.

The rut of complacency claims all of us at one time or another. And our complacency can lead us to the stinking thinking that's only a step away from drinking or using or some other compulsive behaviour. Having sponsors point out our complacency may irritate us, but it may also save our lives.

Practising gratitude will keep us aware of the small and large miracles that we have experienced on this recovery journey: We remember where we were last night (thanks to the clear vision of abstinence). We have reconciled with family members.

In fact, we are walking miracles, and God has a plan for the rest of our lives. Let's be ready for it.

I will try to be attentive to every moment of today, knowing that each experience is part of the miracle of my life.


You are reading from the book:

A Woman's Spirit by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
12-24-2007, 03:30 AM
Some people walk in the rain. Others just get wet.
--Roger Miller

Gifts are usually surprises. We don't generally know what the ribbons, bows, and wrapping conceal.

Life's greatest misfortunes are, in retrospect, often referred to as gifts. While our debt can feel like a curse, when we finally get to the bottom of what's happened to us, we're surprised to find something good - a gift or blessing of sorts. Through our misfortune, we may have developed some true and lasting relationships, learned we had some admirable qualities we didn't know we had, or discovered the meaning of courage.

Today, if I am struggling. I will anticipate the wondrous surprise to come.


You are reading from the book:

Letting Go of Debt by Karen Casanova

MacGyverDel
12-25-2007, 12:09 PM
The miracle is this - the more we share, the more we have.
--Leonard Nimoy

Look around you at the happiest people you know. They are also the most generous and giving people. A generous spirit creates its own environment. In recovery we talk a lot about gratitude - and we have a lot to be grateful for. This feeling of gratitude inspires us to be generous toward others in many different ways. Most sharing is not of material things but a sharing of our spirit, our forgiveness, and our respect for others.

We can cultivate a generous spirit by reminding ourselves that we have enough. We have enough to live well, we are surrounded by love, we have been forgiven for many wrongs that we committed, and life is filled with interesting adventure. When we share from this sense of abundance, our feeling of well-being only grows.

Today I will be generous and sharing toward the other people I come into contact with.


You are reading from the book:

Wisdom to Know by Anonymous




Merry Christmas to those who celebrate. ;)

MacGyverDel
12-26-2007, 05:05 AM
The process rather than the product is primary in caring, for it is only in the present that I can attend to the other.
--Milton Mayeroff

The moment that captures us now is all we have for certain. We can dream endlessly about next week and next year but there are no guarantees. Thus, it is important to care for ourselves and others in this moment. Have we expressed our love to any one of the many special people in our lives today? The effort is small and yet paramount in its impact on how the day unfolds for the givers and the receivers of caring words that inspire - words that speak of love.

Someone close needs our attention today - our encouragement, our inspiration, our recognition. And we need the commitment to focus outside ourselves if we are to discover the gifts promised us in each 24-hour segment of life. It is not coincidence that we feel pulled toward particular people -- that we select certain groups to identify with.

Contemplative thoughtfulness about our presence in this time and place will assure us we are needed for the loving growth of many. The mystery unfolds by design.


You are reading from the book:

Worthy of Love by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
12-27-2007, 02:36 AM
I couldn't hit a wall with a six-gun, but I can twirl one. It looks good.
--John Wayne

Many of us fake emotions because our past experiences never taught us how to use boundaries when dealing with feelings. Now we are oftentimes stumped when it comes to knowing how we should feel or act when we are faced with emotional situations.

Sometimes we need to learn to "fake it till we make it." What is asked of us is to act the part until the part becomes us.

We may not know how to feel anticipation around holidays - but we want to experience joy. We may not know what it feels like to really trust someone, but we would love to be in that position. What we can learn to do is "act as if" - working all the time to liberate the frozen emotions of years gone by - until we actually do experience what we seek.

Like new shoes, my new behaviours and feelings will feel stiff and uncomfortable for a little while. I am willing to live through the "breaking in" period.


You are reading from the book:

Days of Healing, Days of Joy by Earnie Larsen and Carol Larsen Hegarty

;)

britonarius
12-27-2007, 03:45 AM
The world that we live in is one of increasing insensitivity where we encourage people to stifle emotions and signs of sympathy are a no - no. We see these displays of emotion and sympathy as weaknesses and try to get those around us to lock them away. The "faces"that we are taught to wear in public are faces that are non emotive; the message that we give out is one of non care. We need to teach people to open up and relate - its not weakness - its not charity - its the sign of a caring societal member. These thoughts that you put here [ selfish or not ] are reminders to others to wear a face that cares and is not ashamed to feel for others. [ p.s nobody say that i weak or letting it out]

freekgirl
12-27-2007, 05:52 AM
Wow...I just stumbled upon this thread. Don't know how I missed it before.

This is beautiful! Thank you for taking the time to give us all something positive to think about :-)

MacGyverDel
12-28-2007, 02:08 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

The feeling of belonging is a gift.

The feeling of belonging - knowing that we have a place - is one of the most important gifts that two partners can give to each other. When we agree to commit ourselves to a partnership, we give each other the key to our daily lives. We allow our mate to be there with us in a way we would not let others. That means that we can expect to have a place that does not have to be renegotiated every day. This feeling of belonging is a gift, but it must be received. In essence, we say to our partner, "I take my place here in your life because we have our relationship. I will relax. I don't stand at the door and knock. We have already told each other that we are included in each other's lives."

This sense of belonging stands in sharp contrast to those feelings of isolation and alienation that we can feel in so many ways. It does not mean that one partner owns the other or that no boundary or separateness exists. But the joy of connection frees people in relationships to fulfill themselves and carry on their lives while in the close comfort of one they love.

Tell your partner how you know you have a place in her or his life.


You are reading from the book:

The More We Find In Each Other by Merle Fossum and Mavis Fossum

britonarius
12-28-2007, 05:36 AM
Exactly Del - when i met my wife ; that is how we felt and still do . We don't like to be apart ; e.g train at the same time ; shop together. Fortunately i am retired [ Nobody mention my age ] so i can stay with her at home. I still get the feeling ; Del ; that someone is going to quote me and add the line from the movie "3000 miles from Graceland"- thats a lot to hold back!

MacGyverDel
12-29-2007, 01:09 AM
I have a new philosophy. I'm only going to dread one day at a time.
--Charles Schulz

Living one day at a time is a big project. Most of us have just enough faith, patience, and courage to last 24 hours. We all seem to be in need of a daily refueling.

Living in today helps keep our lives balanced and simple. At first, we may need to practice staying in the present. We may find that we need to keep bringing ourselves back to today from yesterday or tomorrow.

There is nothing that will happen today that we can't, with God's help, manage.

Today let me keep my feet firmly planted in the bedrock of the present, my only reality.


You are reading from the book:

Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast

britonarius
12-29-2007, 04:40 AM
I have a new philosophy. I'm only going to dread one day at a time.
--Charles Schulz

Living one day at a time is a big project. Most of us have just enough faith, patience, and courage to last 24 hours. We all seem to be in need of a daily refueling.

Living in today helps keep our lives balanced and simple. At first, we may need to practice staying in the present. We may find that we need to keep bringing ourselves back to today from yesterday or tomorrow.

There is nothing that will happen today that we can't, with God's help, manage.

Today let me keep my feet firmly planted in the bedrock of the present, my only reality.


You are reading from the book:

Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast
REminds me of an old saying that my grandmother always said "Don't put off until tomorrow what can be done today"Bizarrely i often try to adhere to that! Happy new year Del - I hope that its great!

freekgirl
12-29-2007, 04:54 AM
There is nothing that will happen today that we can't, with God's help, manage.




This reminds me of a saying I heard once that always stuck with me...

"The will of God will never take you where the grace of God will not protect you."

Good Stuff!

MacGyverDel
12-30-2007, 02:45 AM
I've shut the door on yesterday,
And thrown the key away.
Tomorrow holds no fears for me,
Since I have found today.
-- Vivian Yeiser Laramore

Feeling guilty or ashamed about the past - about what we did or did not do, about what happened to us, about who we were - can be our undoing. We must work long and hard in our recovery to work through these feelings, not to forget the past - for it informs all that we value in ourselves today - but to put the past into perspective.

After we've taken an inventory and grieved our losses we must forgive ourselves. In forgiving ourselves we can let go of the past and live in today.

With our program of recovery, looking back is not as frightening as it once was. And today we do not have to bear what we find alone.

A new year, a new life, can be ours. Love and friendship, support and spiritual growth are waiting for us today. Our yesterdays are over, and we can look to the future with joy and anticipation.

Today help me forgive myself for what's past and learn to have faith in Your plan for me.


You are reading from the book:

Body, Mind, and Spirit by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
12-31-2007, 04:15 AM
Being less than perfect.

It was not a perfect year. But is there ever a perfect year? Being clean and sober does not purport or offer perfection. It gives us a chance to strive for progress. When we keep our Higher Power in our thoughts and actions, we come closer to perfection all the time.

Despite the disappointments of our complex lives, we are finally beginning to learn how to live. We are finally making progress.


Am I content to be less than perfect?

Higher Power, I pray that I may continue
to strive for progress and be satisfied
to be an imperfect human.


You are reading from the book:

Day by Day - Second Edition by Anonymous

britonarius
12-31-2007, 04:23 AM
[QUOTE=MacgyverDel;112069761]Being less than perfect.

It was not a perfect year. But is there ever a perfect year? Being clean and sober does not purport or offer perfection. It gives us a chance to strive for progress. When we keep our Higher Power in our thoughts and actions, we come closer to perfection all the time.

The pursuit of perfection is what drives man or woman to better themselves ; others and the world around them. No one and nothing is perfect - yet it is that imperfection that allows us to rise up and go in pursuit of the unattainable. It is the dream that allows us to face the nightmare of life. Take care Del. Its an astounding thread.

MacGyverDel
01-01-2008, 02:24 AM
A Year To Grow

This New Year can be a time of growth in sobriety. While we have no crystal ball that tells us what luck and fortune the year will bring, we do have a program that gives us the power to make the best of this year, to grow in sobriety. We can make progress in overcoming resentment and selfishness, we can help others in their search for happy sobriety, and we can make better use of our talents and opportunities.

We can live sober, and we also can find happiness and true self-esteem in sobriety. In our drinking, a desperate search for happiness and self-esteem compelled us to drink, but we could never find our happy destiny in the bottle. No matter what came to us, things had a way of turning sour as we continued to drink and to take other harmful substances.

In our new life, we have good reason to feel confident and optimistic. We have friends who understand us; we have sponsors who will share with us their own experience and hope. We have a Higher Power who is, as the poet Tennyson said, ". . .closer to us than breathing, and nearer than hands and feet." We face nothing alone, and in the New Year all experiences can help us grow.

I face this day with confidence, courage, and optimism. I will know that my Higher Power is present in every person and situation.


You are reading from the book:

Walk in Dry Places by Mel B.

;)

MacGyverDel
01-02-2008, 12:43 AM
Your Destiny

Watch your thoughts,

they become your words.

Watch your words,

they become your actions.

Watch your actions,

they become your character.

Watch your character,

it becomes your destiny.


You are reading from the book:

The 12 Step Prayer Book Volume 2

by Bill P. and Lisa D.

britonarius
01-02-2008, 04:56 AM
Exactly - nice one Del

MacGyverDel
01-03-2008, 03:55 AM
:)

Reflection for the Day

In the old days, I saw everything in terms of forever. Endless hours were spent rehashing old mistakes. I tried to take comfort in the forlorn hope that tomorrow would be "different." As a result, I lived a fantasy life in which happiness was all but nonexistent. No wonder I rarely smiled and hardly ever laughed aloud. Do I still think in terms of "forever"?

Today I Pray

May I set my goals for the New Year not at the yearlong mark, but one day at a time. My traditional New Year's resolutions have been so grandly stated and so soon broken. Let me not weaken my resolve by stretching it to cover "forever" - or even one long year. May I reapply it firmly each new day. May I learn not to stamp my past mistakes with that indelible word, "forever." Instead, may each single day in each New Year be freshened by my newfound hope.

Today I Will Remember

Happy New Day.


You are reading from the book:

A Day at a Time (Softcover) by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
01-04-2008, 04:00 AM
If I should lose, let me stand by the road and cheer as the winners go by.
--Berton Bradley

If we are to be among the winners in the recovery from addiction and obsession, we must maintain the attitude of success. Winners in any 12 Step Program take fearless inventories, correct shortcomings, and willingly make amends. By taking charge of ourselves in this manner, we neither blame nor credit others or events. With confidence and willingness, we hold ourselves responsible for our lives.

We take responsibility for our pre-program faults and conduct. We can then count ourselves among those who, with the help of our Higher Power, can control compulsive and excessive behavior. But we don't do it with pride. We do it with humility and gratitude.

I will begin to lose hold of a winning attitude if I choose to leave spiritual growth to chance. I must make life happen, not let it happen to me.


You are reading from the book:

Easy Does It by Anonymous


:)

MacGyverDel
01-05-2008, 12:06 AM
Anyone can get sober . . .
The trick is to stay and to live sober.
--Living Sober

Newcomer

At one meeting someone mentioned having had a slip. He had been back in recovery for three days. No one criticized him; in fact, everyone applauded. To be honest, it makes me think about seeing what it would be like to have a few drinks or a drug again, just for a day or a weekend.

Sponsor

Over the years, I've watched people come and go in recovery. I've been grateful to the people who relapsed and were lucky enough to come back and share their experience. They taught me a lot by talking about how their disease had continued progressing even when they weren't active in it, and about how much more quickly their misery had returned this time. I'm grateful to them for having had the slip for me; now I don't have to risk it. There's a danger in going back out to experiment with controlled using; few who leave ever make it back. This is a life threatening disease. People like us, who depend on using an addictive substance, can die from it. We understand the seriousness of our addictions and have no need to test recovery by trying to use "safely."

Today, I want life - all of it. I embrace my recovery; I stick close to those who know how to stay stopped.


You are reading from the book:

If You Want What We Have by Joan Larkin

;)

britonarius
01-07-2008, 12:18 AM
When i worked in Spain ; i was running a restuarant and socialability with customers in a tourist area is paramount to business success ; i would sociably have a drink with them if offered. The owner would come at 1 in the morning to help shut up and to discuss the business. On this particular day [ i began at 10 in the morning and worked 10 to 2 and 6 till finish] , he arrived and helped ; wanted to talk so offered a drink as usual. I asked for bourbon [ my drink of choice] ; he said "i'll open a new bottle". I didn't drink it ; all that went through my mind was that i had set out a new bottle that morning [ a 1 litre bottle] and we had only sold it to me! One litre in a day is beyond- i was lucky! Its a thing that you fail to notice until its too late in normal circumstances. You get used to it. Just wanted to share that Del - many thanks for reminding me of that; its a thing that serves as a constant reminder that sometimes we do get lucky.

MacGyverDel
01-07-2008, 03:30 AM
Today's thought from Hazelden is:

I have become quite good at blocking out what I don't want to hear or notice.

Right in the middle of hearing someone scream, or during a crisis, I can zone out and not hear or see a thing. I have become such an expert at this that, even when not in crisis, I don't hear what other people are saying, including my children. I can be looking straight ahead at the television and not know what I'm watching.

This is a survival skill that I acquired in order to protect myself from frightening or potentially dangerous situations. It served me well in the past, but it no longer serves me. It is difficult to change this pattern, but now that I'm aware of my "zoning out" behavior, I can learn to consciously come back to the real world. Today I will practice paying attention and tuning in to the sounds and events around me.

You are reading from the book:


Time to Break Free by Judith R. Smith

MacGyverDel
01-07-2008, 03:35 AM
The events in our lives happen in a sequence in time, but in their significance to ourselves they find their own order.
--Eudora Welty

We will experience no coincidence today. All situations that transpire in the next 24 hours have their purpose. No single event, not the tired, hurried smile from a boss, the phone call from a frantic friend, or the cold response from a co-worker is without impact on our current perception of life. However, we shouldn't try to evaluate the full significance of any passing event without God's help. Letting our Higher Power offer us clarity regarding the circumstances in our life will ensure a healthy perspective.

We've all experienced trauma because we exaggerated a problem rather than calmly let our inner wisdom guide us. We're only an impulsive thought away from a flurry of problems. Likewise, we're only an instant away from peace and enlightenment. The quiet mind will be ever present if that's our wish.

I'll truly understand the events of today if I quietly let God reveal their significance.


You are reading from the book:

In God's Care by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
01-08-2008, 03:17 AM
You had better live your best and act your best and think your best today: for today is the sure preparation for tomorrow and all the other tomorrows that follow.
--Harriet Martineau


The word "sanity" is derived from the Latin word sanitas, which means "health." In our group, we think of health as wholeness of mind, body, and spirit.

One way to achieve health and wholeness is by living one day at a time. To do this successfully, we need to realize we cannot undo a single act we performed or unsay any harsh words spoken in the past. No matter how much we may regret or re-feel yesterday's painful experiences, there is nothing we can do to change what happened. The past is forever beyond our control.

The same thing is true of the future. No matter how much we may worry and fret over it, very few of us can predict what tomorrow will bring. We can only prepare for a hope-filled future by living fully and confidently today.

TODAY is all I have. Let me make the most of it.


You are reading from the book:

The Reflecting Pond by Liane Cordes

:)

MacGyverDel
01-09-2008, 12:15 AM
The Journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
-- Chinese proverb

Life holds so many choices now that we are sober. We'd like to go so many places. We'd like to see so many things. We have so much to do.

We are slowly learning how to trust our dreams and reach for them. Our program teaches us that we live One Day at a Time. We make progress by doing First Things First, Easy Does It.

Our dreams may seem very big and far away. We wonder if we'll ever get there. But our faith tells us to go for it. And we know how: One Step at a Time.

Prayer for the Day

Higher Power, help me know this gentle truth that my life matters. Help me set goals that I can grow toward, one step at a time.

Action for the Day

Today I'll think about one of my goals. I will list ten little steps that will help me get there.


You are reading from the book:

Keep It Simple by Anonymous

;)

MacGyverDel
01-10-2008, 04:58 AM
Maturity doesn't come with age or intellectual wisdom, only with love.
--Ruth Casey

We may have thought being mature meant being "grown-up." This meant acting rationally, showing good judgment, no longer exhibiting childish behavior. It's doubtful that we ever considered the expression of love as an act of maturity. However, we are learning that the key to sustained growth is the ability to love one another and ourselves.

It seems so much easier to focus on others' faults than on their assets. In childhood we learned to compete with our classmates, and this taught us to be critical of one another. No teacher tested us on how we expressed love; rather, we worked on spelling and multiplication tables, and we were pitted against other students for the gold stars.

Now we are discovering how much more comfortable life is when we all get gold stars. We are handling every situation more sanely now that we have realized the gift of serenity that accompanies our expression of love.

My growth, my maturity in this program, can best be measured by my attitude today. Am I loving, or am I still competing with the others?


You are reading from the book:

A Woman's Spirit by Karen Casey

britonarius
01-11-2008, 01:52 AM
[QUOTE=MacgyverDel;115189331]The Journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
-- Chinese proverb

A man can only walk a certain time in one direction before he goes another, as change [ even of direction ] is inevitable. What is difficult for all of us is knowing that the change of direction is good and in the best interests for us; treat it as a challenge. The one thing that we all agree on - is that we don't like change yet change is inevitable. Good luck Del - its a rocky road this one of life and we each must make the most of it.

MacGyverDel
01-11-2008, 03:21 AM
Success is just a matter of luck. Ask any failure.
--Edmund Wilson

Jim worked very hard all day cleaning cars in a drive-through car wash. He used to have a better job, but he wanted to start a new life so he took what he could get until something better came along. When he got paid, he showed his unemployed brother the check and the brother said, "God, I wish I were you - I'm flat busted! You're so lucky you got some money!"

Often when we're feeling sorry for ourselves, it's because we aren't willing to change the things we can. Jim didn't get money because he was lucky - he got it because he changed himself. He changed his attitude from, "working in a car wash is degrading" to, "I'm proud to take responsibility for myself."

Today, let me change the things I can and turn self-pity into self-determination.


You are reading from the book:

Our Best Days by Nancy Hull-Mast

MacGyverDel
01-12-2008, 12:42 AM
Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them.
--Oscar Wilde

The mature person eventually forgives his parents. Any adult can look back and see childhood wrongs and unfairness. Many of us were disappointed by our parents, even neglected or hurt by them. We certainly didn't get all we wanted or needed. Yet, upon joining the ranks of adults, we become responsible for ourselves. Every situation has limited choices, and we work with what we've got. As adults, we realize this is exactly where our parents were when we were children. They, too, were born into an imperfect world and had to do the best they could.

When we can forgive our parents, we are free to accept them as they are, as we might a friend. We can accept them, enjoy the relationship, and forget about collecting old debts. Making peace with them imparts to us the strengths of previous generations and helps us be more at peace with ourselves.

I pray for the maturity and the wisdom to be more forgiving of my parents.


You are reading from the book:

Touchstones by Anonymous

:o

MacGyverDel
01-13-2008, 03:40 AM
I don't believe in predicting, especially about the future.
-- Casey Stengel


With the pace of change continuing to accelerate, the future is not what it used to be. From one moment to the next, no one can be certain of anything. Your job, your marriage, and your relationship to your children - none of these may be the same next year, next month, or even next week.

How does one survive this changing landscape? First, by being flexible and adaptable - ready to change course at any moment. Be prepared to "roll with the punches" and release your old attachments or current expectations.

Second, practice living one day at a time. Realize that the only thing you can really affect is how you feel this instant. By focusing on the present moment, you can continue to experience peace and joy - no matter how the outer circumstances may change.

Finally, know that the removal of old securities opens the way to new opportunities. Human consciousness is moving to ever-higher levels of awareness. How much easier the journey is when we flow with the process of change.


You are reading from the book:

Listening to Your Inner Voice by Douglas Bloch

MacGyverDel
01-14-2008, 02:29 AM
Step Two: Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
-- Step Two of Al-Anon

We come to believe in a better life through the powerful gift of other people - hearing them, seeing them, and watching the gift of recovery at work in their lives. There is a Power greater than us. There is real hope now that things can and will be different and better for our life and us.

We are not in a "do it ourselves" program. We do not have to exert willpower to change. We do not have to force our recovery to happen. We do not have to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps just so we believe that there is a Power greater than ourselves - one who will get the job done in our life. This Power will do for us what our greatest and most diligent efforts could not accomplish.

Our Higher Power will restore us to a sane and beneficial life. All we do is believe.

Look. Watch. See the people around you. See the healing they have found. Then discover your own faith, your own belief, your own healing.

Today, regardless of my circumstances, I will believe to the best of my ability that a Power greater than myself can and will restore me to a peaceful, sane way of living.


You are reading from the book:

The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

britonarius
01-14-2008, 02:55 AM
Del - you should publish the collection. Its outstanding and merits more consideration than it gets.

MacGyverDel
01-14-2008, 03:06 AM
Del - you should publish the collection. Its outstanding and merits more consideration than it gets.

:p They are published. ;) These are just from e-mail I get. And a variety of books for various addictions.

I do own a few of the books one being Touchstones which is an awesome read for men in the first couple years of sobriety.

:)

MacGyverDel
01-15-2008, 01:12 AM
Love is something if you give it away, you end up having more.
--Malvina Reynolds

The abundant life appeals to us. Seldom do we want less money, fewer toys, clothes, or friends. In general, we want more of everything and still more - particularly of love. The truth is that the things we hoard or hide or fear losing must be shared or soon may be lost.

Giving love to a lover, a friend, or even a stranger will fill up our own empty spaces where love wants to be. And we'll glow radiantly with the warmth that hovers on the heels of love expressed.

The pantry of the human heart is never bare when love is being served. We pass this way with one another, not by mere chance, but by design for the nourishment that is love.

Our greatest hope, to be loved, is ours when we've made that hope a reality for someone else.


You are reading from the book:

Worthy of Love by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
01-16-2008, 12:47 AM
Hope and patience are two sovereign remedies for all, the surest reposal, the softest cushions to lean on in adversity.
--Robert Burton

It is just as easy to think, "I can" as it is to think, "I can't." Both attitudes are habitual orientations to life that can become automatic with practice. Neither attitude has as much to do with the task at hand as it does with the inner spirit of the person facing the task. In either case, the task is the same - only the attitude is different.

But what a difference! The "I can" people are the ones we want to spend time with and to use as models. These are the people who either have never lost, or have worked to regain the positive outlook we are all born with. It never occurs to a baby, for example, that all that staggering and falling means he or she will never learn to walk. Babies grow, move forward, and succeed. They haven't learned to hang back or fear defeat. Knee-jerk negativity is something we can all do without. Let's backtrack to that time in our lives when all things were possible ... because they still are.

Today, I will focus on my successes. "I can" is my credo.


You are reading from the book:

Days of Healing, Days of Joy by Earnie Larsen and Carol Larsen Hegarty

;)

MacGyverDel
01-17-2008, 02:04 AM
We wonder, "How can I ever say this?"

We need to be free to talk about anything in our intimate relationships. Some things are very hard to say - an old secret we have never told before, a feeling or an observation our partner does not want to hear, a mistake we made that calls for confession. We wonder, "How can I ever say this? How can I avoid hurting myself or my partner?"

Not all things need to be said at once. Readiness is the first part. We can get ourselves ready to speak. The second part is timing. When we are ready, we wait for a good moment to appear, a moment in which our message will fit. The third part is love. Honesty coupled with care and love is healing and strengthening. Some pain is necessary in a growing relationship, and we can tolerate it because it leads to more understanding and more peace of mind.

Think of one new thing you would like to tell your mate about your thoughts, feelings, or behavior.


You are reading from the book:

The More We Find In Each Other by Merle Fossum and Mavis Fossum

MacGyverDel
01-18-2008, 01:31 AM
:o

We must constantly build dykes of courage to hold back the flood of fear.
--Martin Luther King, Jr.

The definition of courage is the ability to conquer fear or despair. In the past we may have been called courageous because we stayed in circumstances that were difficult or nearly unbearable. We may have felt that walking away from family, children, or friends was cowardly or displayed weakness. We may have felt that by holding back our tears we were stronger people.

Yet all the things we may have viewed as weakness are really signs of courage. All the things we believed to be acts of courage were really not courageous at all. If we walked away from difficult or unbearable circumstances, we would be conquering despair. If we cried, we would have been courageous by letting go of our fear, pain, or sadness.

Courage doesn't mean putting ourselves in stressful or unpleasant situations. Courage doesn't mean controlling our emotions. Courage is the ability to strengthen ourselves against the fear and despair of life, rather than be drowned by it.

What have I done today that took courage? I can be grateful for my courage and strengthen it.


You are reading from the book:

Night Light by Amy E. Dean

MacGyverDel
01-19-2008, 12:40 AM
Every day is a different day. You never know what it will bring. That's the exciting thing about getting up every morning.
--Alpha English

No doubt we have all hit spells when we didn't feel the urge to get the day going. Pulling the covers up around us seemed far more inviting. There's nothing wrong with occasionally resisting the next twenty-four hours. We do need variety in our lives. Even a healthy, fun routine is still a routine. Shaking it up is good for us. But if we make a habit of avoiding whatever plans we've made, we need to take an inventory of our feelings. Depression isn't foreign to most of us. Chronic depression needs to be addressed, however.

If we begin to feel blue about our lives, let's make sure we are expressing our feelings to a friend. Generally, there is a simple solution. Maybe we have forgotten to pray and meditate regularly. Perhaps we have become self-absorbed. Being appreciative of others generally changes how we see every aspect of our lives. Recounting with a confidant or in a journal all the blessings and achievements we've accumulated over these many decades often pushes us out of the doldrums.

Let's remember that most days surprised us with their outcomes. We never got exactly what we expected. This is one certainty about life that we can always count on.

Today is bound to surprise me in how it unfolds. I'll appreciate what comes my way.


You are reading from the book:

Keepers of the Wisdom by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
01-20-2008, 12:36 AM
I've made mistakes and will continue to make mistakes. Everybody makes mistakes. The difference now is that I can see them more clearly afterward, and I am not living in denial about them.

If I become too critical of myself when I do make a mistake, I can remind myself that it's part of being human. I can remind myself that it's a learning experience and a mistake I won't make so easily in the future. Mistakes are not made intentionally, but they are errors caused by a lack of information or lack of attention.

Today I pay attention more than ever before and have more information than I ever have had. Mistakes will still happen, but they were in my past. I can allow myself to make mistakes, understanding that when I give myself this freedom, I am accepting myself for who I am and loving myself unconditionally.


You are reading from the book:

Time to Fly Free by Judith R. Smith

britonarius
01-20-2008, 03:26 AM
Its an outstanding thread and one that many would do well to read and take in. Have a good weekend Del and keep it going.

MacGyverDel
01-21-2008, 03:25 AM
The greater part of our happiness or misery depends on our dispositions and not on our circumstances.
--Martha Washington

We all have friends who seem happy even though they run into lots of bad luck. And we all know other people who seem grumpy all the time. Nothing makes them very happy. It's puzzling, but some people have decided, maybe without even knowing it, that life is fun and should be enjoyed. No bit of bad luck has to make us miserable unless we let it.

A broken bike, a lost math assignment, a rained-out picnic are things that might make us miserable. But, we can decide they won't. Feeling happy can be a habit - just like brushing teeth before bedtime.

Will I stop and think today before I let things make me unhappy?


You are reading from the book:

Today's Gift by Anonymous

:o

MacGyverDel
01-22-2008, 02:46 AM
To have one's individuality completely ignored is like being pushed quite out of life. Like being blown out as one blows out a light.
--Evelyn Scott

We need to know that we matter in this life. We need evidence that others are aware of our presence. And thus, we can be certain that others need the same attention from us. When we give it, we get it. So the giving of attention to another searching soul meets our own need for attention as well.

Respectful recognition of another's presence blesses that person, ourselves, and God. And we help one another grow, in important ways, each time we pay the compliment of acknowledgment.

We're not sure, on occasion, just what we have to offer our friends, families, co-workers. Why we are in certain circumstances may have us baffled, but it's quite probably that the people we associate with regularly need something we can give them; the reverse is just as likely. So we can begin with close attention to people in our path. It takes careful listening and close observation to sense the message another soul may be sending to our own.

I will be conscious of the people around me. I shall acknowledge them and be thankful for all they are offering me.


You are reading from the book:

Each Day a New Beginning by Karen Casey

;)

MacGyverDel
01-23-2008, 12:25 AM
Trust that good will come.

It was a slow, boring January day. We had just moved in to our new home. Construction wasn't complete. The house was a mess. All we had was a plan and a dream. There wasn't any furniture yet. We were lying around on the floor. It was too cold and rainy to be outdoors.

I don't know who got the idea first, my son or me. But we both picked up Magic Markers about the same time. Then we started drawing on the wall.

"What do you want to happen in your life?" I asked. He drew pictures of seaplanes, and mountains, and boats leaving the shore. One picture was of a video cameraman jumping out of a plane. "I want adventure," he said.

I drew pictures of a woman tromping around the world. She went to war-torn countries. She visited the mountains and the oceans and many exciting places. Then I drew a heart around the entire picture, and she sat there in the middle of all the experiences on a big stack of books. "I want stories," I said, "ones with a lot of heart."

Across the entire picture, in big letters, he wrote the word "Woohoo!" On the bottom of the wall I wrote, "The future is only limited by what we can see now." He grabbed a marker, crossed out only, and changed it to never. "There," he said, "it's done."

Thank God, the future is never limited by what we can see right now.

Before we start speaking the language of letting go, we need to understand what a powerful behavior letting go and letting God really is.

God, help me do my part. Then help me let go and let You do yours.


You are reading from the book:

More Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie

MacGyverDel
01-24-2008, 03:17 AM
:o

Only when we humbly ask for help are we ready to receive it.

On occasion, our problems seem overwhelming, and we don't know where to turn. Our job is stressful. Our health is failing. But many of us face no truly threatening situations, and we still have problems. Being alive, being human, means having experiences that trouble us.

It's hard to ask for help when we are in a troubling situation because we fear that means we are inadequate. After all, we are grown men and women who have taken care of others and ourselves for years. We don't have the wisdom to handle every situation, and yet we think we should. Seeking guidance from friends, sponsors, and our Higher Power gets easier with practice. Asking for help is a learned behavior. And practice we must!

But just as important as the seeking is the receiving. Are we actually open to the wisdom offered? Do we want it badly enough to truly listen to the guidance?

I will open my heart to God's wisdom today and find help for whatever troubles me.


You are reading from the book:

A Life of My Own by Karen Casey

MacGyverDel
01-25-2008, 02:34 AM
;)

In order to arrive at possessing everything, desire to possess nothing.
- St. John of the Cross

Expectations can cause havoc in our daily living. We all have a basic right to be treated with dignity and respect, but that doesn't mean life will always go our way. The twists and turns of life often carry us up rivers of disappointment to shores we never chose to visit.

Facing life as fully involved travelers, without expectations about outcomes, is perhaps the brightest way to travel. Making plans without setting up for certain outcomes makes us flexible people who learn to go with the flow. It has been said that there is a direct proportion between our level of expectation and the amount of stress we have in our lives. Trusting the results to a larger plan allows us to relax and enjoy the adventure of the journey.

As we grow closer to our Higher Power, we find we can let go. We are more peaceful and confident, less frantic and controlling. Trusting that our Higher Power will protect us, no matter what we encounter on our journey, helps us face the future with a calm and loving heart.

Today let me relax into life and let go of my expectations.


You are reading from the book:

Body, Mind, and Spirit by Anonymous

MacGyverDel
01-26-2008, 05:41 AM
Being able to be wrong

We had to compete with everyone, sometimes subtly, sometimes less subtly. We always had to be right, to be wrong seemed unbearable. We could never seem to bring ourselves to say simply, "I was wrong." We were afraid of what would happen to us if we did. Our egos were very fragile; we were never as strong as we had led ourselves to believe.

We came to discover, however, that real strength comes from being able to be wrong and from being willing to change our ways of thinking and living.

Can I face being wrong and learn from it?

Higher Power, help me realize each day that it is okay to be wrong, that real communication with other people depends on my being willing to see other points of view, and that being teachable is a divine quality.


You are reading from the book:

Day by Day - Second Edition by Anonymous

johnrich69
01-26-2008, 08:47 AM
Those are some great post! It sound like you're definately a person of depth and in search of more... Stay on your path as it will continue to strengthen your body and soul. Johnny

HC
01-26-2008, 04:42 PM
In on page 9 Del :D

MacGyverDel
01-27-2008, 01:28 AM
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

This program is a way of life. It is a way of living that we need to learn if we're going to remain free of our affliction. The Twelve Steps are like guideposts that point the direction in which we must go. But members of the group must find their own best way of living the program. We don't all do it exactly alike. Whether by quiet times in the morning, by meetings, working with others, spreading the word, we have to learn to live the program. Have I made this program my regular, natural way of living?

MEDITATION FOR THE DAY

I will relax and not get tense. I will have no fear, because everything will work out in the end. I will learn soul-balance and poise in a vacillating, changing world. I will claim God's power and use it, because, if I do not use it, that power will be withdrawn. As long as I get back to God and replenish my strength after each task, no work can be too much.

PRAYER FOR THE DAY

I pray that I may relax and that God's strength will be given to me. I pray that I may subject my will to God's will and be free of all tenseness.


You are reading from the book:

Look to this Day by Alan L. Roeck

MacGyverDel
01-28-2008, 03:38 AM
A spiritual life is natural

Conscious Contact. Coming into what is clearly a spiritual program, we may have been fearful that our own unworthiness would hold us back. We may have believed that a spiritual life and a "conscious contact" with God are reserved for a few people with saintly qualities.

What we must know is that the spiritual life is every person's right. It includes the human qualities that have brought our greatest progress. "The spirit of the thing" is an ordinary phrase, but it expresses the presence of a Higher Power in our lives.

What's most useful to know is that we can contact our Higher Power at any time, in any place. This can be extremely important when we are in very bad situations. We always have a Higher Power to pull us through and to set things right in our lives. That's our birthright as human beings.

I'll turn to my Higher Power frequently throughout the day, if only for a few moments each time. This will keep me on the right path.


You are reading from the book:

Walk in Dry Places by Mel B.