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View Full Version : Draining Cooked Ground Beef Reduces Fat???



superfreakiest
07-11-2007, 01:13 AM
I know all about draining the fat from cooked ground beef.... Cook it, drain it, run it though some water, wash that fat off, etc. then throw it into some spaghetti sauce...

But I never see details on how much fat is reduced.

1. How much fat from the ground beef is reduced by draining? ie. if I have 6 oz. beef with 26 grams of fat, do I lose 50% of that fat, less? more?

2. Would washing the cooked ground beef reduce protein, iron or other nutrients too?

sanpedro
07-11-2007, 01:16 AM
oh gawd

if you wash that beef it's going to taste so crappy

just enjoy your beef, please

PS san diego ... lol

in10city
07-11-2007, 01:22 AM
Have read of this -> Reducing Fat in Cooked Ground Beef : Quantified (http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=1465201)
...
From the above...
http://www.teachfree.com/uDocs/Reducing%20Fat%20in%20Cooked%20Ground%20Beef.pdf

A study in the Journal of The American Dietetic Association* has good news for beef eaters. Nutrition researchers found that a simple rinsing process reduced the fat content of cooked ground beef crumbles by as much as 50 percent. And, blotting can be used to reduce the fat content of cooked burgers, meatballs and meatloaf. So whether you buy ground beef for taste, convenience or price, you also can enjoy the health benefits of lower-fat ground beef with a few easy steps.

Wiseguy158
07-11-2007, 01:27 AM
You wouldn't loose protein macros from draining, unless you see meat being washed away. The fat is a liquid, so it washes off to some degree - protein is a solid, so you would be able to see it going down the sink. As for other nutriendts, I'm sure you might be loosing some vitamins/minerals associated w/ beef, but I think most of it is held in the flesh, or protein ... so again, if you aren't washing away the actual solid product, you should be okay.

Wiseguy158
07-11-2007, 01:29 AM
oh gawd

if you wash that beef it's going to taste so crappy

just enjoy your beef, please

PS san diego ... lol

PS - season your beef AFTER you rinse it ... cook it, drain it, toss it in a heated pan w/ some salt/pepper/paprika/garlic powder ... whatever you want it to taste like. You can still get it to taste decent.

superfreakiest
07-11-2007, 01:40 AM
in10city, interesting link, I'll follow up on that.

Thanks guys for the responses. It was just one of those things bugging me since I try to limit my saturated fat intake. I often just let the beef cool and scrape off the fat too.

Then season it later (as suggested by Wiseguy158) and throw it in sauce or with egg whites, refried beans and green chiles.

superfreakiest
07-11-2007, 02:25 AM
I did some more research and found some really interesting stuff....

1. Reducing Fat in Ground Meat Cooking
http://www.oznet.k-state.edu/humannutrition/_timely/GMCK.HTM


Industry studies on ground beef, lamb and pork have shown that with the brown-and-drain process, ground meats with higher initial fat levels lose more fat and cholesterol than lower fat ground meats. Even then, total fat content and total calories from the cooked meat remained higher for meat samples with higher initial fat levels.

Some iron and water-soluble vitamins, for which red meat is an important dietary source, were lost in the brown-and-drain process. Mineral retention varied from 84% to 96% among different minerals. Water-soluble vitamins were retained over a range of 66% to 78% among thiamin, niacin and cobalamin.

Rinsing browned ground beef with warm water (650 C to 700 C) further reduced fat content, but the beef flavor was considerably reduced by the rinsing. Use of hot water also reduced ash content.



2. Method to produce a cooked, low fat ground meat product
United States Patent 5,576,047
http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=9&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=5576047&OS=5576047&RS=5576047



It is well known that the cooking of raw ground meat produces a mixture of solid "chunky" cooked ground meat and a liquid phase consisting of liquified fat and water based broth formed during the denaturization (cooking) of the meat proteins.

Surprisingly, it has been discovered (see Example 2 below) that, after separation of the liquid phase, the cooked ground meat is not only low in fat content, but also only contains only about 8 grams of fat for every 100 grams of raw meat cooked, irrespective of the initial fat content of the raw ground meat.

Thus, according to the present invention, low fat (10 to 12% by weight fat) cooked ground meat can be produced from almost any percent fat raw meat, and in particular, from inexpensive high fat (.about.25% weight) raw meat--provided, of course, that the rendered liquid phase can be separated from the cooked meat.

Dominikm
07-11-2007, 02:49 AM
Damn thats interesting.

And if you were to use the better lean cuts of meat is 8g/100g (8%) better than that again?

skinnyboipgh
07-11-2007, 03:10 AM
Still, IMO the most important single factor controlling the fat in ur ground meat is the original fat content at the point of sale. This is controllable in the preparation of the ground meat & the info is typically on the label.

I prefer to buy 93/7 or 95/5 to start with instead of getting a fattier mix & trying 2 do "damage control" afterward.

in10city
07-11-2007, 03:37 AM
Damn thats interesting.

And if you were to use the better lean cuts of meat is 8g/100g (8%) better than that again?
The leaner it is, the less you will be able to reduce the fat content. Nonetheless, you will still lessen it to an extent.

gjohnson5
07-11-2007, 03:43 AM
Wow

the fat content in beef is what gives the meat it's flavor and also the fats raise testosterone.
If you start with a meat that is more lean to begin with , the fats can help build muscle.

Eat ground beef in moderation and shouldn't have a need to drain it at all.


80% of saturated fats are burned off as energy anyway

Jules Verne
07-11-2007, 04:05 AM
oh gawd

if you wash that beef it's going to taste so crappy

just enjoy your beef, please

PS san diego ... lol

You can certainly overdo the fat reduction/cooking/draining/rinsing and I would not use this method for making burgers for instance - just get lean beef.

However, you can also add back some fat - like olive oil and add spices and it's not so bad. In that case at least the fat source is healthier, IMO more tasty and you have more control over the amount of fat.

I think this works well for stuff like chilli, especially when starting with 80% lean beef which I personally think tastes better with less fat. But definitely for some things, I just buy the more expensive leaner ground beef.

xamadeix
07-11-2007, 05:28 AM
i just wash it in hot water and pat dry

PickItUp
07-11-2007, 07:14 AM
the BEST way to reduce fat in ground beef is to start at the source.

If you start with 93% lean or better, then you get more meat per pound...so the price difference is almost negligible considering that when you drain, there is MUCH less fat overall.

Don't bother rinsing the meat...the gain is so minimal.

kombatnt
07-11-2007, 07:59 AM
1. Reducing Fat in Ground Meat Cooking
http://www.oznet.k-state.edu/humannutrition/_timely/GMCK.HTM

Rinsing browned ground beef with warm water (650 C to 700 C) further reduced fat content, but the beef flavor was considerably reduced by the rinsing.


If you're rising your beef with water at 700 degrees Celcius, make sure you stand very far away, as it will be under enormous pressure. :)

siamesedream
07-11-2007, 08:27 AM
MY secret is to not only rinse it, but wash it with detergent and water as well. Removes ALL the fat.

I can't believe you guys didn't think this up yourselves.

Sibrek
07-11-2007, 08:27 AM
MY secret is to not only rinse it, but wash it with detergent and water as well. Removes ALL the fat.

I can't believe you guys didn't think this up yourselves.
You're going to kill someone on here some day.

Lotto20
07-11-2007, 08:35 AM
^^lmao.....

just eat it man buy extra lean or lean.....and u shouldnt have a problem

baarat
07-11-2007, 09:54 AM
^^lmao.....

just eat it man buy extra lean or lean.....and u shouldnt have a problem

LOL....After rincing the beef, get a towel and wring out the extra fat, then open the trash and throw it in. Now were sure intake of fat is low. This also contributes to eating disorders. ;) The american phobia of fat continues....a 5 star thread.

Sibrek
07-11-2007, 09:58 AM
wouldn't a george foreman accomplish that better? maybe taste like ass though.

johnsbod
07-11-2007, 10:36 AM
I always drain my beef, but I don't like to rinse it. For me personally, too much flavor is lost to make it worth it. I get most of it by draining it, so I don't worry about it. I just did this cooking dinner a few hours ago and the compromise is worth it IMO.

hobscrk777
07-11-2007, 11:56 AM
the BEST way to reduce fat in ground beef is to start at the source.

If you start with 93% lean or better, then you get more meat per pound...so the price difference is almost negligible considering that when you drain, there is MUCH less fat overall.

Don't bother rinsing the meat...the gain is so minimal.


This guy is right. I really think the price difference is negligible in the end, and it's much easier to start low-fat then meticulously drain away the liquid fat from higher-fat beef.

Richie_Awesome
07-11-2007, 12:02 PM
I did some more research and found some really interesting stuff....

1. Reducing Fat in Ground Meat Cooking
http://www.oznet.k-state.edu/humannutrition/_timely/GMCK.HTM



2. Method to produce a cooked, low fat ground meat product
United States Patent 5,576,047
http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=9&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=5576047&OS=5576047&RS=5576047





wait...that says that regardless of original fat content, you can cook a meat down to nearly the same leaness as, say, 93/7 lean meat?


What is the difference between draining and cooking it and separating the fat? Any?

Richie_Awesome
07-11-2007, 12:04 PM
the BEST way to reduce fat in ground beef is to start at the source.

If you start with 93% lean or better, then you get more meat per pound...so the price difference is almost negligible considering that when you drain, there is MUCH less fat overall.

Don't bother rinsing the meat...the gain is so minimal.

Yes, but by buying 93/7 meat, you're paying around $1.50 a pound more than getting say 80/20 or so. Yet, you still get nearly the same protein content.

PickItUp
07-11-2007, 01:10 PM
Yes, but by buying 93/7 meat, you're paying around $1.50 a pound more than getting say 80/20 or so. Yet, you still get nearly the same protein content.

That was the point I tried to make. You spend up to $1.50 more on the lean beef...but you keep more final product...for me, it is a wash...for a penny pincher...you may actually save $.42 by getting the 80% beef, draining it, and then washing it...

I get the 93% lean stuff unless the 80% stuff is on some kind of super sale.

Frank784
07-11-2007, 01:25 PM
Not sure if this link has been posted, but I read it about a year ago.

http://www.beefnutrition.org/uDocs/Reducing%20Fat%20in%20Cooked%20Ground%20Beef.pdf

Basically it says that no matter what fat content ground beef that you buy, you can get to the same final amount of fat in the end with blotting/draining, and rinsing. Personally I tried this with 80/20 ground beef. They say to season after you do the rinsing, for obvious reasons. I wouldn't recommend rinsing for the reason many have already stated; you wash away all of the flavor.

Everyone knows that the higher the concentration of fat, the better it tastes. Personally I would just stick with lean ground beef. If I'm stuck and can only get the 80/20, I would just blot/rinse...it isn't like I eat it every day.

gjohnson5
07-11-2007, 01:25 PM
I will argue with anyone that water can get past 212 degrees F much less 700 degrees C


If you're rising your beef with water at 700 degrees Celcius, make sure you stand very far away, as it will be under enormous pressure. :)

Richie_Awesome
07-11-2007, 01:27 PM
So, does cooking it and letting the fat turn into liquid and separating it from the meat the same?

Jules Verne
07-11-2007, 02:48 PM
I will argue with anyone that water can get past 212 degrees F much less 700 degrees C

That's why he said 'enormous pressure'. Under enough pressure you can get water to high temps. What pressure it would take to keep water a liquid at 700C, I don't know - perhaps that is not possible?

Either you are incorrect, or you have done some calculations that says that the pressure needed is impossible to attain...

I suspect the former, because you can certainly heat water beyond 212F!

baarat
07-11-2007, 03:07 PM
That's why he said 'enormous pressure'. Under enough pressure you can get water to high temps. What pressure it would take to keep water a liquid at 700C, I don't know - perhaps that is not possible?

Either you are incorrect, or you have done some calculations that says that the pressure needed is impossible to attain...

I suspect the former, because you can certainly heat water beyond 212F!Water turns to vapor, or steam at 100C (212F). I doubt it could ever maintain H2O properties past that. Boiling point on top of mount everest is 69C. Couldn't imagine how far below sea level you'd have to be to reach 600C.

johnsbod
07-11-2007, 03:10 PM
That's why he said 'enormous pressure'. Under enough pressure you can get water to high temps. What pressure it would take to keep water a liquid at 700C, I don't know - perhaps that is not possible?

Either you are incorrect, or you have done some calculations that says that the pressure needed is impossible to attain...

I suspect the former, because you can certainly heat water beyond 212F!

I decided to look it up out of curiousity. Here's what I found.....

Since pressure cooking depends on the pressure of steam, the process cannot easily be used for methods of cooking that produce fairly little steam, such as roasting, pan-frying or deep-frying. Most pressure cookers sold in the U.S. have an internal pressure setting of 15 psi, the standard determined by the USDA in 1917. At this pressure water boils at 125 ?C (257 ?F). The higher temperature causes the food to cook faster. Cooking times can be reduced by a factor of 70 percent. For example, shredded cabbage is cooked in one minute, fresh green beans in three minutes, small to medium-sized potatoes cook in five minutes (depending on thickness and type), and a whole "roast" chicken takes only twenty minutes. It is often used to simulate the effects of long braising or simmering in shorter periods of time. Some pressure cookers do not reach the standard 15 psi pressure and cooking times may need to be increased slightly to compensate.[1]

The materials used for making cookers are generally aluminium and stainless steel. The aluminium may be stamped and buffed or anodised, however aluminium pans should not be put in a dishwasher. Stainless steel pressure cookers range from the plain-jane variety at the low-end, to the more expensive modern units that are made like the best cookware with heavy, three-ply, or copper-clad bottoms for uniform heating. Most modern pressure cookers are dishwasher safe, although some manufacturers may recommend washing by hand. A gasket forms an airtight seal which does not allow air or steam to escape between the pan and the lid, the only way the steam can escape is through a regulator on the lid when the pressure has built up (or if the regulator is blocked, through a safety valve). Sometimes the gasket is referred to as a sealing ring.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressure_cooker

.....but still nowhere close to 700 degrees Celsius, which is what I expected.

Richie_Awesome
07-14-2007, 11:30 AM
So, does cooking it and letting the fat turn into liquid and separating it from the meat the same?

,,,

dumac
07-14-2007, 01:00 PM
get yourself a george forman grill. those things will take a lot of the fat away. of course your hamburgers will taste very plain and will be a little dry but the right spices and seasonings can fix that problem. i like to add a little laury's seasoning salt to the ground beef because it is lower in sodium then normal salt and tastes better.

DRK
07-14-2007, 01:47 PM
Water turns to vapor, or steam at 100C (212F). I doubt it could ever maintain H2O properties past that. Boiling point on top of mount everest is 69C. Couldn't imagine how far below sea level you'd have to be to reach 600C.

Water turns to vapor/steam at 100C at 1atm pressure (sea level). It's basic thermodynamics/chemistry, water turns to steam when the vapor pressure of the water is equal to the atmospheric pressure on the water. So the higher the pressure on the water, the higher the boiling temperature.

At 50GPa pressures (about 500,000 atmospheres), water can remain liquid all the way to something like 1200K, about 1500 degrees Celsius.