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Eric_FXST
10-04-2004, 12:45 PM
Could my wife, who has never weight trained before, just start off working with me on part of my split?
She could work on this routine:
M- Cardio
T- Back/Bis
W- Cardio
Th- Chest/Tris
F- Legs
Sat/Sun- Cardio

She would be performing 15-20 sets of 8-12 reps for each day.

As long as the weight is to her ability, would this allow her a quality start, or would it be overworking her muscles?
Or, would this be stifling her newbie gains?

After 9 months and 800 posts, I once again feel lost. :D
Eric.

Ivey_Itch
10-04-2004, 01:18 PM
Don't forget a Rest day or 2! :) don't want to get burnt out first thing! Start slow and then add more :D

Laurie
10-04-2004, 01:21 PM
"15 -20 sets?" I guess you are meaning three different exercises for each muscle group? Ease her into this with fewer sets and not so many exercises per muscle group. Easy to get gungho and burnout.

The best advice for a newbie woman would come from WildBuffCat's answer to another newbie. This about training and nutrition:

WildBuffCat's Advice to Newbies (http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=290201)

When I started a college women's strength class, two years ago, the routine was pretty straight forward as most of us never lifted before. 4 sets of 10-12 reps with a minute's rest between each set. We all use light weights at first and went from there as we progressed or stayed...depending on ability and interest. I found I loved it and ran with the premise.

Here is the basic routine:
Bench
Flies
Curls Dbl(sulpinating)
Tri pushdowns
Overhead extensions

Day two
Leg Press (or squats)
Leg curls
leg exensions
Lunges
Calf presses

Day three
Pulldowns to chest
Bentover Dbl rows
Upright rows
Shoulder press
laterals

Everyday
Crunches
Reverse Crunches

We had access to machines in the gym for the bench, shoulder and leg presses. Near the end of the first semester, I graduated to doing flat bench press with the Olympic bar/plates as I was dissatisfied with my progress using the Universal Chest press. Would alternate with doing dbl presses too and included Incline presses as well. Went to using freeweights for the shoulder press as well. Preferred squats over leg presses.

At home, I have an Olympic bench with bar/plates and dbls. I do maintaince routine working out at least twice a week due to work and family concerns ( family run historical arms and armour business) this keeps me fairly active otherwise. That and eating properly.

Eric_FXST
10-04-2004, 01:47 PM
Don't forget a Rest day or 2! :) don't want to get burnt out first thing! Start slow and then add more :D
Oops, I'm sorry! You probably think I'm one heck of a husband working the heck out of his poor wife. :D :D
I actually meant that on Saturday/Sunday we go outside for a leasurely walk or bike ride with the kids.
Sure, I make her walk 20 miles, in the snow, with no shoes...but that's our secret. :D

Eric_FXST
10-04-2004, 01:56 PM
"15 -20 sets?" I guess you are meaning three different exercises for each muscle group? Ease her into this with fewer sets and not so many exercises per muscle group. Easy to get gungho and burnout.

Here is the basic routine:
Bench
Flies
Curls Dbl(sulpinating)
Tri pushdowns
Overhead extensions

Day two
Leg Press (or squats)
Leg curls
leg exensions
Lunges
Calf presses

Day three
Pulldowns to chest
Bentover Dbl rows
Upright rows
Shoulder press
laterals

Everyday
Crunches
Reverse Crunches


Laurie, thanks again!
Yes, I am sure you are correct about gung ho and burnout, in my wife's case. My wife is excited yet weary about this whole 'lifting weights' thing. I once tried to teach her how to golf. After 3 missed swings, A LOT of my advice, she kicked over the bucket of balls, threw the club on the ground, and went to sit in the car.
I don't want to make the same mistake twice. :D

I think I will use your routine and with what I have already obtained from BuffedWildCat's thread, I will let her devise her routine and only offer pointers(if asked).

BTW, I am thinking of having her try and perform as many of these exercises with free weights, rahter than machines. This is the way I have always lifted, and for personal reasons, feel this is the way she should start.
Thoughts on this?

Eric.

flathead
10-04-2004, 02:16 PM
Hi Eric Fxst,

I suggest not putting her on a routine at first. Just show her how to do each machine and free weight exercise and let her choose what she would like to do. Limit her training time to 20 minutes at first. You want her to leave feeling good and stimulated but not fatiqued.

Over time she will ask you to create a routine for her.

Go slow, I have been trying to get my wife to train for 28 years, no success yet.

Good luck.

Laurie
10-04-2004, 02:28 PM
We are all stronger on one side or the other, depending whether we are right or left handed. By using dbls, you can build the weaker arm to match closer to your right by strengthening the support muscles. Women might be just as strong as any man in the lower body strength, we do need to build the upper body too. A matter of adaption and what works best.

When I was using the machine chestpress, I found I was compensating with my stronger right to push the bar up into place. The same thing with the shoulder press machine. Frustrating. When I switched over to freeweights, my left was forced to do more work and was strengthened thereby. Alternating by using dbls for these presses helped alot by working the support muscles more.

I still had a rep lag problem with my left when doing curls and shoulder presses. Found out later, it was from an old RC tear from an old fall (supraspinatus) years prior. So what I did was do RC exercise before my main arm ones...and if I could not complete the last set of curls with my left. Would drop abit and complete it with the lower weight with more reps. This seemed to work to build the strength up.

Some exercises, I could not do, I can do now since doing this. Like the Laterals, I could not do these at first with my left....it HURT...even with 3- 5lb dbl. So my instructor told me to drop that exercise to prevent further injury. After two years lifting,I went back and can do these with 5lbs and abit more without any pain. But I built up muscle strength during the interim. I was told I could not do Military presses anymore because of the tear but found other alternative exercises and adapted instead......so started using palms facing dbl shoulder presses instead for long time. I have reintroduced alternating dbl military presses and got back up to 25-30 dbls now. But have not tried military barbell press for along time.

Using dbls at first or for most is a good idea.

Eric_FXST
10-04-2004, 02:52 PM
Hi Eric Fxst,

You want her to leave feeling good and stimulated but not fatiqued.


Excellent point!
That is easy for me to overlook. I enjoy sitting in the office being totally wiped out from an exercise. I hobble around the house laughing after a great legs workout.
My wife always asks, "Why do you do that to yourself?"

So, feeling good post-workout would be a requisite for her.

Laurie
10-04-2004, 02:58 PM
Flathead, I know what you mean. For years, my husband would drop hints but I would balk. My selfesteem was not that bad but I was not going to be pushed into anything I did not feel like doing. I grew up with during the Hippy/Twiggy generation and if you were anything over a 12-14 (as I was then), you were fat....did not matter if you were a good solid, Scot/Irish "farmstock" as my mother once described me. Before marriage, I used to ride a 10 speed all over San Diego as my main exercise and was a solid 165lbs then at 5'6"/largeboned.

I did try diets and they did not seem to work. Got married at 20. Even did abit of lifting in my twenties but without a guide (other than what my husband could remember) it got old quickly as I was not seeing any results. To go into a gym to use freeweights was something a woman just did not do back then and would be consider "strange" for even trying. We were all under alot of "Female Myths" about using freeweights then. Lastly, there was no gym to go to anyway. Cardio only was the biggy and jogging killed my shins. Where I lived I could not bike ride either.

Had kids in my early 30s and ballooned up from 244 (where I had been since my 20s) to 260. Dropped back to 245 by menopause in my early 40s. I had always been pretty solid from living a rural lifestyle and carry my fat in my shoulders/back and stomach instead of hips/thighs/legs. But I was losing flexibility, losing some strength, walking was hurting my back and started to really look around at the hobbling older snowbirds that come flocking down each winter. I realized I was going down that route and decided to put a stop to it.

Made the commitment to myself to take the class for a year and stuck with it. Found this place and read how to eat better and when. I did not stuff myself with food....hardly ate most of the time, only when I was hungry and the wrong stuff when I did.

Last year, after I dropped 60lbs, my husband told me I should have done this 20 years ago .....I shot back with "Well, I am doing it now" and that shut him up. Since then I dropped 15lbs of more fat, lost more inches and wearing clothes sizes I wore before getting married. But the scale says I weigh abit more (now 175lbs).....from the muscle I built up over the past two years. I dont mind the exchange and my health improved immensely as well as getting my strength back.

But I made the choice myself and I realize this is a complex issue. I am at the age where I dont care what others think anymore. I have to be happy with myself inside and for quite awhile was resigned to thinking my previous weight was where I was going to stay at. Especially true if you have esteem problems no matter how nicely the hints are given.......you can lead someone to water but you cannot make them drink if they dont want to.

Sometimes, the person will just have to find the water for themselves. The path taken may not be the one you offer but theirs alone to find.

moody_weasel
10-05-2004, 12:18 AM
BTW, I am thinking of having her try and perform as many of these exercises with free weights, rahter than machines. This is the way I have always lifted, and for personal reasons, feel this is the way she should start.


Absolutely! Don't let her waste time on machines if it's not absolutely necessary.

Anima
10-05-2004, 01:04 AM
But I made the choice myself and I realize this is a complex issue. I am at the age where I dont care what others think anymore. I have to be happy with myself inside and for quite awhile was resigned to thinking my previous weight was where I was going to stay at. Especially true if you have esteem problems no matter how nicely the hints are given.......you can lead someone to water but you cannot make them drink if they dont want to.

Sometimes, the person will just have to find the water for themselves. The path taken may not be the one you offer but theirs alone to find.

Man can I relate to this. I wish I had dont this earlier but hell I am doing it NOW. Best to be positive about the here and now. And about not giving a toss about what others think... :D:D:D grand isnt it? Feels great. Wish I had been able to find THAT about 20 years ago!!!!!! Would have changed my life. Well, it has NOW.

Best thing for self esteem IMO is noticing the little improvements she makes and praising her for it, but also fostering her looking at herself in pride. All the comments on earth wont top her being ble to look in the mirror and smile, even if all it is is a little more tightness in the triceps for example (god am I happy to be rid of my "bat wings!!!)

Wish her luck and happiness from me.

Ivey_Itch
10-05-2004, 06:01 AM
Oops, I'm sorry! You probably think I'm one heck of a husband working the heck out of his poor wife. :D :D
I actually meant that on Saturday/Sunday we go outside for a leasurely walk or bike ride with the kids.
Sure, I make her walk 20 miles, in the snow, with no shoes...but that's our secret. :D

Haha..i Just thought I would have to kill my husband if he never gave me a break :) ..just looking out for your safety!! :D