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fratboi850
05-15-2007, 09:39 AM
I just started using fitday.com to track my calories recently and it says I burn almost 3500 calories a day... that seems like alot considering I'm only like 183lbs. Anyone else notice this?

sugapablo
05-15-2007, 09:40 AM
I just started using fitday.com to track my calories recently and it says I burn almost 3500 calories a day... that seems like alot considering I'm only like 183lbs. Anyone else notice this?

I only use the daily food log. The rest doesn't seem entirely thrilling.

ChacoTom
05-15-2007, 09:42 AM
As much as I like FitDay for tracking calories in food, I don't use it for that sort of thing. I found it's much more accurate to figure out your normal activity rate of metabolism (resting rate of metabolism x activity (but NOT including exercise), and then add calories from each exercise session.

fratboi850
05-15-2007, 09:46 AM
Whats a more accurate way to measure this then?

Death From Above
05-15-2007, 09:55 AM
Whats a more accurate way to measure this then?

generalizing exercise then multiplying 1.0-1.8 by your BMR, or eating a particular caloric intake for week or two, see if you gain, lose , or maintain, if you maintain your calories in = your calories out and youre neutral for caloric +/-

TDetroit
05-15-2007, 09:57 AM
I've heard the simple math is 10 x body weight in pounds for basal.
Add for activity level
add or subtract for cutting or bulking

Of course activity level is the question.

There is a test, I know you can get it in Atlanta. Where they put an Oxygen mask on you and measure your metabolic rate, you fat burn zones, your anabolic rate etc. real helpful for training. they might have it near you as well - problem, probably around $200.

If you can't swing it, guess. Watch your body, weigh in everyday and track your diet. If you lose 1 lbs on a day of rest, then your metabolic rate is 300 cals above that. 300 cals = 1 lbs.
Let's say, 1 work day, no work out, you eat 2500 cals, and gain 1 pound. Then your metabolic rate on that day was 2200 cal. Now test again with a workout and same food. See what happens. That's how Arnold did it. They didn't have all this fancy gadgetry in those days behind the Iron Curtain. He just watched his body and adjusted.

Death From Above
05-15-2007, 10:01 AM
I've heard the simple math is 10 x body weight in pounds for basal.
Add for activity level
add or subtract for cutting or bulking

Of course activity level is the question.

There is a test, I know you can get it in Atlanta. Where they put an Oxygen mask on you and measure your metabolic rate, you fat burn zones, your anabolic rate etc. real helpful for training. they might have it near you as well - problem, probably around $200.

If you can't swing it, guess. Watch your body, weigh in everyday and track your diet. If you lose 1 lbs on a day of rest, then your metabolic rate is 300 cals above that. 300 cals = 1 lbs.
Let's say, 1 work day, no work out, you eat 2500 cals, and gain 1 pound. Then your metabolic rate on that day was 2200 cal. Now test again with a workout and same food. See what happens. That's how Arnold did it. They didn't have all this fancy gadgetry in those days behind the Iron Curtain. He just watched his body and adjusted.

First is bull****, second is bull****, third as well.

if someone was 200 lbs 8% body fat would they have the same BMR as someone 200lbs 18% body fat? no

Ive done those tests (called the medgem) they are inaccurate and costly.

300 calories is not 1lb of mass. Weight fluctuates up to 5 lbs per day and this is EXTREMELY inaccurate and wrong. (water weight, water retention, glycogen, food in body)

only way to really know if test intake in correlation with weight increase/decrease or how you look to yourself in the mirror.

The Ashbringer
05-15-2007, 10:08 AM
The Harris-Benedict equation for BMR:
For men: (13.75 x w) + (5 x h) - (6.76 x a) + 66
For women: (9.56 x w) + (1.85 x h) - (4.68 x a) + 655

Multiply result of top equation by....

Activity
Factor Category Definition
1.2 Sedentary Little or no exercise and desk job
1.375 Lightly Active Light exercise or sports 1-3 days a week
1.55 Moderately Active Moderate exercise or sports 3-5 days a week
1.725 Very Active Hard exercise or sports 6-7 days a week
1.9 Extremely Active Hard daily exercise or sports and physical job

It's really only something to point you in the right direction, you are still required to weigh yourself and modify your diet accordingly to determine what is working best for you.

jay.
05-15-2007, 11:11 AM
The Harris-Benedict equation for BMR:
For men: (13.75 x w) + (5 x h) - (6.76 x a) + 66
For women: (9.56 x w) + (1.85 x h) - (4.68 x a) + 655

Multiply result of top equation by....

Activity
Factor Category Definition
1.2 Sedentary Little or no exercise and desk job
1.375 Lightly Active Light exercise or sports 1-3 days a week
1.55 Moderately Active Moderate exercise or sports 3-5 days a week
1.725 Very Active Hard exercise or sports 6-7 days a week
1.9 Extremely Active Hard daily exercise or sports and physical job

It's really only something to point you in the right direction, you are still required to weigh yourself and modify your diet accordingly to determine what is working best for you.this is probably the best advice on here. use the formula as a guideline and keep your calorie intake stable and track your weight for a couple weeks or longer. if you're consistently gaining weight, drop the calories by 300-500 (could be more or less, this is just the increment i use), keep your calorie intake stable for two weeks, and track your weight again. if you're losing more than 2lbs/week up the cals and repeat. might take about 2+ months to get a semi-accurate result...

that's all it is...trial and error.

martina92685
05-15-2007, 11:15 AM
I love Fitday, but I feel like it's exercise counters are kinda off. I've been using it for the past month and I've been losing so it may be close, but some of their calories per minute for exercises seem a little high or low, depending on the exercise.

ChacoTom
05-15-2007, 11:26 AM
Whats a more accurate way to measure this then?

I use this resting metabolic rate calculator (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/calrmr.htm), just to get a "baseline" calorie expenditure. For example, let's say the average from this page was 2,500 calories. I would multiply that by 7, to get a weekly amount: 7 x 2,500 = 17,500 calories.

Then I calculate the calories expended in exercise per week. In my case, that would be 4 cardio sessions at 1,000 calories each, plus 2 weight sessions at 650 calories each. This would add 5,300 calories.

The total weekly expenditure would be 17500 + 5300 = 22,800, or 3,257 calories a day.

This is the starting figure for maintenance calories. However, you have to adjust this figure based on your own metabolism. You can do this either by eating at maintenance, and seeing if you lose or gain weight, or by having a surplus or deficit, and seeing if the amount you gain or lose is equal to your surplus/deficit. No matter what, the odds are that you'll have to adjust the starting figure up or down.