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aznballer69
02-10-2004, 07:40 PM
alright heres my story.... i think im pretty fit. im not fat. i have i guess a two pack? i lift weights a lot and i run everyday but i dont run so much because i get cramps. i get them on the upper right of my stomach. it hurts like hell and it keeps me from running that often. ive read articles and it says dont eat for three hours before. i dont eat for three hours but i still get them. not eating for three hours just delays when i get the cramps. ive also read that says if u are just new to running then that might happen but im not. i run about 1 mile every day and every time i run i get them it could start when ive only run about 1/8 mile to 1/2 mile. do you guys have any ideas on how i could get rid of them? thanks

Xiety
02-10-2004, 07:53 PM
i have the same problem :(

Gloggy
02-10-2004, 07:58 PM
It's a really common problem when running. Your diaphragm is causing the pain and it's literally because your insides aren't used to being jolted around so much. You have one of two options. Run through it (this really works, it never lasts very long) or you need to practice a breathing technique called belly breathing. Most people breathe with their chests. However, you want to breathe with your belly when you're running because it forces the diaphragm to expand and contract fully. This usually gets rid of the cramps very quickly. For interest sake, virtually everyone gets side cramps on the right hand side just under the ribcage. If you're getting it there, you're in good company ;).

Gloggy
02-10-2004, 08:07 PM
Also, another thought. Running 1 mile isn't really a lot. That could be why you're still getting cramps. Are you running very quickly or taking your time? The reason I ask is that if you're running for cardiovascular fitness, you would need to run a mile in about 9 minutes (or thereabouts). In order to get any cardiovascular benefit you would need to run for about 30 - 45 minutes and that would be at least 3 to 5 miles. Try to train up to that distance though (only increase mileage 10% per week) otherwise you can expect some nasty injuries. Those cramps should be gone in no time once your body adapts to the strains of running.

Keep it up though. Running can be one of the most rewarding pastimes ever. It's a really great way to spend your time (at least IMHO).

Mr Nasty
02-10-2004, 09:10 PM
I have been getting cramps in my shins (excuse my spelling). I get them pretty low in the front shin, then is gradually works its way up the intire shin and around to the calve. Its not really a cramp, but rather a intense burning feeling. Its gets to the piont where I have to quit running and begin a slow walk. Even walking up hill makes my shins and calves burn. That's the only part of my leg that seems to bother me. Everywhere else is fine.

I never used to have htis problem. I could run 3-4 miles with out even a slight burn. But that was also 2-3 years ago and before I gained 25lbs. Could the weight gain be the reason i get these burning sensations?

Gloggy
02-10-2004, 11:38 PM
Originally posted by Mr Nasty
I have been getting cramps in my shins (excuse my spelling). I get them pretty low in the front shin, then is gradually works its way up the intire shin and around to the calve. Its not really a cramp, but rather a intense burning feeling.


A couple of questions on this one. How recently did you start running again? How heavy are you? What kind of shoes are you using? Does it always set in on the same distance during your run?

Generally it is one of two things (shinsplints is a bit too generic a term). Firstly it can be tibia bone strain. You can easily check whether it might be this by feeling along the front of your tibia. If you find a spot on the tibia that hurts sharply and much more severly than the surrounding area, it's likely to be bone strain. This is common on the lower shin and occurs particularly often in new runners or people that haven't run for a long time. The reason this occurs is that the bone is unused to the strain of running and therefore takes a bit of a pounding. For a beginner, it's not too dangerous, however it's a condition that must be watched carefully or it can result in a fracture. If you haven't run in a very long time remember that your skeleton isn't particularly strong and it takes your body about 90 days to replace the old, weak skeleton with a stronger, more solid skeleton.

If the pain is not localized and occurs all over your shin then it's much less serious. This just tends to be muscular strain and is generally a condition that shouldn't get too much worse.

In both cases you're really doing the right thing. When it comes on, stop running. Walk instead. With all running injuries it's important to be careful. Running put a heavy strain on your body. Always watch your condition for signs of deterioration. If it gets worse, you have to stop for a while. A fracture takes a long time to heal so don't push your luck.

Mr Nasty
02-11-2004, 10:09 AM
Originally posted by Gloggy
A couple of questions on this one. How recently did you start running again? How heavy are you? What kind of shoes are you using? Does it always set in on the same distance during your run? To answer your questions, I always run a 5-10min warm up befor each work out. I've been doing this for years. Sometimes, usually by the end of my warm up, the burn will set in. Cardio on the other hand has just picked up in the last several weeks. Also, I'm 205 up from 180lbs. I'm not fat, I've been cycling. The weight gain is definitly taking its toll on my body. My get lower back pains, and no these shin strains. As for shoes, I have a pair of skate shoes, there made for high activity (walking, running, jogging, skating, jumping, ect.). And lastly, the burn usually sets in anywhere from 5-8 min after cardio starts.

I usually run, up hill walk, stair step, or ride a bike. The only time I get this burn I speak of is when I run on a tredmill. Its not a localized pain as you discribed, it just starts around my lower shin. It's definitely a muscle strain for sure.

I'm just unsure as to why its happening. My guess is the weight I've put on over the last year......

Gloggy
02-11-2004, 10:47 AM
Mr Nasty, I really doubt it. If as you say you've been running for many years already then it's unlikely to be the extra weight. 200 lbs is hardly too heavy to run. It's far more likely to be your shoes or lack of calf strength. For running longer than 2 miles you really should use running shoes. Running shoes are specifically designed to correct a whole range of biomechanical problems. Very few other shoes do this because they're designed for comfort or short bursts of speed. If you're keen on keeping on running (it burns a TON of fat) then invest in a pair of decent running shoes. It may even be that the middle sole in your current shoes has started to collapse, not providing enough cushioning. Shinsplints is common in people with mild to excessive ankle pronation.

In any case, I doubt it's your weight. Look at the shoes and calf strength first.