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MUSCULARMAYOR
04-11-2007, 07:52 AM
I read that ibuprofen(advil) breaks down muscle tissue. Does anyone know if it's true?

TheSlash
04-11-2007, 10:01 AM
Makes sense doesn't it? If your mind is masking the muscle, you won't get the proteins to it..../shrug I would guess its more of a prevent than a break down tho.

I'd say it's more then likely true, but enough to worry about? naw. As long as your taking it for a good reason and not just doms.

MUSCULARMAYOR
04-11-2007, 10:30 AM
Yeah I'm taking it for carpal tunnel, I f**ked up my wrists pretending to be a powerlifter.

Mike Russo
04-11-2007, 10:41 AM
yes, ibuprofen, aspirin also, especially aspirin, can be stronger than expected on muscles and nervous system, causing breakdown. I currently don't use aspirin, ibuprofen or naproxen sodium pills, they give me too many side- effects before I realize/see any benefit.

IronAbrams
04-11-2007, 11:11 AM
NSAIDS reduce muscle growth and repair by 50% following exercise.

Best to tough it out or use other methods (active recovery, massage, cryotherapy) if you've got really bad soreness or else you're selling yourself short.

Alec Trevelyan
04-11-2007, 11:29 AM
So waht about the people who use an ECA stack?

jmonty
04-11-2007, 12:05 PM
yes, ibuprofen, aspirin also, especially aspirin, can be stronger than expected on muscles and nervous system, causing breakdown. I currently don't use aspirin, ibuprofen or naproxen sodium pills, they give me too many side- effects before I realize/see any benefit.
any proof of that? i don't believe it.

euphoria1
04-11-2007, 01:01 PM
Yes, Proof

In nonskeletal muscle tissues, the over the counter analgesic drugs ibuprofen and acetaminophen function through suppression of PG synthesis. We previously reported that ibuprofen and acetaminophen inhibit the normal increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis after high intensity eccentric resistance exercise. The current study examined skeletal muscle PG levels in the same subjects to further investigate the mechanisms of action of these drugs in exercised skeletal muscle. Twenty-four males (25 ? 3 yr) were assigned to 3 groups that received the maximal over the counter dose of ibuprofen (1200 mg/d), acetaminophen (4000 mg/d), or a placebo after 10?14 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions at 120% of concentric 1 repetition maximum using the knee extensors. Preexercise and 24 h postexercise biopsies of the vastus lateralis revealed that the exercise-induced change in PGF2{alpha} in the placebo group (77%) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from those in the ibuprofen (-1%) and acetaminophen (-14%) groups. However, the exercise-induced change in PGE2 in the placebo group (64%) was only significantly different (P < 0.05) from that in the acetaminophen group (-16%). The exercise-induced changes in PGF2{alpha} and PGE2 were not different between the ibuprofen and acetaminophen groups. These results suggest that ibuprofen and acetaminophen have a comparable effect on suppressing the normal increase in PGF2{alpha} in human skeletal muscle after eccentric resistance exercise, which may profoundly influence the anabolic response of muscle to this form of exercise

gecko2424
04-11-2007, 01:16 PM
Yes, Proof...

Prove it.

Dominik
04-11-2007, 01:17 PM
I read that ibuprofen(advil) breaks down muscle tissue. Does anyone know if it's true?It's not the muscles I'd be worried about, that **** is bad for your kidneys. At low doses, every now and then it might be okay (I'd still be using it as a last resort), but as a long-term regular treatment it's bad news.

gecko2424
04-11-2007, 01:22 PM
I had a headache after lunch
I took a naproxim sodium
I feel great
nuff said.

SDFlip
04-11-2007, 01:22 PM
i'd rather get negged than take NSAIDS

gecko2424
04-11-2007, 01:24 PM
done

Uriel_da_man
04-11-2007, 01:28 PM
Yes, Proof

In nonskeletal muscle tissues, the over the counter analgesic drugs ibuprofen and acetaminophen function through suppression of PG synthesis. We previously reported that ibuprofen and acetaminophen inhibit the normal increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis after high intensity eccentric resistance exercise. The current study examined skeletal muscle PG levels in the same subjects to further investigate the mechanisms of action of these drugs in exercised skeletal muscle. Twenty-four males (25 ? 3 yr) were assigned to 3 groups that received the maximal over the counter dose of ibuprofen (1200 mg/d), acetaminophen (4000 mg/d), or a placebo after 10?14 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions at 120% of concentric 1 repetition maximum using the knee extensors. Preexercise and 24 h postexercise biopsies of the vastus lateralis revealed that the exercise-induced change in PGF2{alpha} in the placebo group (77%) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from those in the ibuprofen (-1%) and acetaminophen (-14%) groups. However, the exercise-induced change in PGE2 in the placebo group (64%) was only significantly different (P < 0.05) from that in the acetaminophen group (-16%). The exercise-induced changes in PGF2{alpha} and PGE2 were not different between the ibuprofen and acetaminophen groups. These results suggest that ibuprofen and acetaminophen have a comparable effect on suppressing the normal increase in PGF2{alpha} in human skeletal muscle after eccentric resistance exercise, which may profoundly influence the anabolic response of muscle to this form of exercise
It's just one of those studies. It proves that high amounts of it are bad (which is old news), but I don't think a 200mg pill is that bad.

Besides all drugs should be used only when actually necessary, if you feel like taking a pill just because get a tic-tac.

gecko2424
04-11-2007, 01:30 PM
i pop tums everyday cuz they taste good and for teh calciumz

ChokeOnStrength
04-11-2007, 02:41 PM
Do you guys have any idea what affects Dexedrine may have on muscles?

LMW
04-11-2007, 02:58 PM
wtf i take like 3 ibuprofens everyday i got bad knees/ankles :(

Tyro
04-11-2007, 03:37 PM
o shti i never knew this but if it helps muscle and cartidgle inflamation il go with it

stracin
04-11-2007, 03:41 PM
CRAP!!! I've been taking motrin 800's to help me sleep at night!!!

Exod
04-11-2007, 03:58 PM
Yes, Proof

In nonskeletal muscle tissues, the over the counter analgesic drugs ibuprofen and acetaminophen function through suppression of PG synthesis. We previously reported that ibuprofen and acetaminophen inhibit the normal increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis after high intensity eccentric resistance exercise. The current study examined skeletal muscle PG levels in the same subjects to further investigate the mechanisms of action of these drugs in exercised skeletal muscle. Twenty-four males (25 ? 3 yr) were assigned to 3 groups that received the maximal over the counter dose of ibuprofen (1200 mg/d), acetaminophen (4000 mg/d), or a placebo after 10?14 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions at 120% of concentric 1 repetition maximum using the knee extensors. Preexercise and 24 h postexercise biopsies of the vastus lateralis revealed that the exercise-induced change in PGF2{alpha} in the placebo group (77%) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from those in the ibuprofen (-1%) and acetaminophen (-14%) groups. However, the exercise-induced change in PGE2 in the placebo group (64%) was only significantly different (P < 0.05) from that in the acetaminophen group (-16%). The exercise-induced changes in PGF2{alpha} and PGE2 were not different between the ibuprofen and acetaminophen groups. These results suggest that ibuprofen and acetaminophen have a comparable effect on suppressing the normal increase in PGF2{alpha} in human skeletal muscle after eccentric resistance exercise, which may profoundly influence the anabolic response of muscle to this form of exercise

Lol, you're gonna need a better study than that to convince me. 24 ppl? using a surrogate endpoint of PGF and equating it to anabolic response from exercise ? It doesn't even make since because acetaminophen is a much much weaker inhibitor of PG synthesis than Ibuprofen.

Anyhow, I doubt (hope) ppl here are taking these kinds of doses pre and post workout.