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View Full Version : Rice: Less calories when cooked (wtf?)



BuggerOff
12-30-2003, 04:08 PM
Just browsing www.CalorieKing.com, and was surprised to see that rice aparantly has less than half the calories when it's cooked than when it's raw.

I better stop eating raw rice then. lol ;)

Anyone know why this is?

mister_geeman
12-30-2003, 04:11 PM
buggeroff - you have too much time on your hands. LOL

What rice do you eat?

BuggerOff
12-30-2003, 04:15 PM
None really. But I'm going to start. I looked at all the rices listed there. Type "rice" into the search engine and then browse through the list on to the next page (the 2nd one), and it lists a few different types of rice. They all have about 1/3 the calories when cooked as opposed to when they're raw.

Weird.

as0l0
12-30-2003, 05:36 PM
it surely is caused by the weight difference...1 cup of raw rice = 3 or 4 or whatever cups of cooked rice

p.s. since your in australia (you are aren't you?) then dietclub.com.au will give a lot of info on australian products where calorieking won't.

mister_geeman
12-30-2003, 05:38 PM
not just the pretty face are ya as0l0

BuggerOff
12-30-2003, 05:39 PM
Duh, As010. Now I feel like an idiot, of course it's so obvious!

Yeah, I am in Australia. Thanks for your help! :)

as0l0
12-30-2003, 05:51 PM
Originally posted by mister_geeman
not just the pretty face are ya as0l0
not even...:/

JackedinNY
12-31-2003, 01:28 PM
or , rice loses sodium and other things when boiled

footballjunior
12-31-2003, 02:07 PM
sodium doesnt equate to calories...does it?

JackedinNY
01-01-2004, 09:05 AM
yea, actually it does, you think when you add salt to your food, your not adding calories? rice also loses other macronutrients like many foods when boiled,

as0l0
01-01-2004, 12:44 PM
right, so how many calories does a shake of salt have in it? lets call it a dash of salt...

http://www.calorieking.com/foods/food.php?amount=1&unit=28853&category_id=72&brand_id=1&food_id=64500&partner=

but then some people are hardcore, so how much in a cup of salt?

http://www.calorieking.com/foods/food.php?amount=1&unit=28852&category_id=72&brand_id=1&food_id=64500&partner=

or a kilogram of salt?

http://www.calorieking.com/foods/food.php?amount=1000&unit=-1&category_id=72&brand_id=1&food_id=64500&partner=

BuggerOff
01-02-2004, 07:48 PM
Bahahahahahaha :D

"a kilogram of salt" :D

footballjunior
01-02-2004, 07:51 PM
Originally posted by as0l0
right, so how many calories does a shake of salt have in it? lets call it a dash of salt...

http://www.calorieking.com/foods/food.php?amount=1&unit=28853&category_id=72&brand_id=1&food_id=64500&partner=

but then some people are hardcore, so how much in a cup of salt?

http://www.calorieking.com/foods/food.php?amount=1&unit=28852&category_id=72&brand_id=1&food_id=64500&partner=

or a kilogram of salt?

http://www.calorieking.com/foods/food.php?amount=1000&unit=-1&category_id=72&brand_id=1&food_id=64500&partner= thanx-thats what i thought...

musclemidget
01-03-2004, 02:16 PM
Originally posted by footballjunior
sodium doesnt equate to calories...does it?

there are no calories in salt what-so-ever.

Ceman
09-09-2014, 04:37 PM
I better stop eating raw rice then. lol ;)

Anyone know why this is?[/QUOTE]

Water doesn't contain calories, so the addition of water to rice in boiling won't alter the calorific value. The extra weight of the rice after it has been cooked has got nothing to do with it because it's merely water that makes the weight difference. In fact, if you were to dry out a grain of rice that had been boiled, it would weigh less than a raw grain of rice of the same proportions. What the rice loses in cooking is lots of starch, and it is this loss of starch that reduces the calorific value of cooked rice. To take full advantage of the starch loss, it is good practice to thoroughly rinse your cooked rice with boiling water through a sieve. I pour a kettle full through my boiled rice to get rid of all the excess starch. :)

MrM27
09-09-2014, 05:25 PM
Water doesn't contain calories, so the addition of water to rice in boiling won't alter the calorific value. The extra weight of the rice after it has been cooked has got nothing to do with it because it's merely water that makes the weight difference. In fact, if you were to dry out a grain of rice that had been boiled, it would weigh less than a raw grain of rice of the same proportions. What the rice loses in cooking is lots of starch, and it is this loss of starch that reduces the calorific value of cooked rice. To take full advantage of the starch loss, it is good practice to thoroughly rinse your cooked rice with boiling water through a sieve. I pour a kettle full through my boiled rice to get rid of all the excess starch. :)
Super strong 11 year old bump.

Luclin999
09-09-2014, 05:51 PM
Super strong 11 year old bump.

I can't wrap my head around why so many people on this forum keep doing this.

th3pwn3r
09-10-2014, 06:13 PM
I can't wrap my head around why so many people on this forum keep doing this.

Noobs, people on their phone or people who just don't pay attention to what the hell is going on. That and you can't fix stupid.

ignarly12
09-10-2014, 07:44 PM
Calories are a measurement of energy, when you're cooking the rice you're actually burning some of it to release energy before your body does it all

JustLost
09-14-2014, 02:20 PM
Super strong 11 year old bump.

Misinformation is timeless.