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[C]onstantine
12-19-2003, 06:48 AM
guys....does the protein in the prawn have a high biological value??????

BoxerUK
12-19-2003, 07:28 AM
They are a great source of protein.

footballjunior
12-19-2003, 08:27 AM
sorry, but whats prawn?

AJbuilder
12-19-2003, 08:28 AM
Originally posted by footballjunior
sorry, but whats prawn?


it's like shrimp


small shrimps

Geoff2010
12-19-2003, 08:55 AM
prawn go from really small to really large. a large prawn can weigh almost 3oz. and a small once can weigh .01oz.

AJbuilder
12-19-2003, 09:12 AM
the large ones are referred to as crawfish .

Geoff2010
12-19-2003, 09:25 AM
I think they are also referred to as King Prawn... I may be mistaken, but I believe crawfish are slightly different species.


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CRAWFISH: freshwater crustacean smaller than but structurally very similar to its marine relative the lobster , and found in ponds and streams in most parts of the world except Africa. Crayfish grow some 3 to 4 in. (7.6-10.2 cm) in length and are usually brownish green; some cave-dwelling forms are colorless and eyeless. They are scavengers, feeding on decayed organic matter and also on small fish. The swamp crayfish digs a burrow up to 3 ft (91 cm) deep with a water-filled cavity at the bottom in case of drought. The eggs develop while attached to the swimming legs of the female and look like miniature adults when hatched. Although crayfish are not eaten in most parts of the United States, they are consumed in areas in the Mississippi River basin and are used in the Louisiana area in a thick soup called crayfish bisque. They are agricultural pests in the Mississippi Delta area, where they feed on sprouting wheat and corn. A red-clawed species is considered a delicacy in Europe. Crayfish are classified in the phylum Arthropoda , subphylum Crustacea, order Decapoda.

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PRAWN: small marine decapod crustacean with 10 jointed legs on the thorax, well-developed swimmerets on the abdominal segments, and a body that is compressed laterally. Shrimp differ from their close relatives, the lobsters and crabs, in that they are primarily swimmers rather than crawlers. As with other crustaceans, the body is covered with a smooth exoskeleton that must be periodically shed and re-formed as the animal grows. However, the shrimp's exoskeleton tends to be thinner than that of most other crustaceans; it is grayish and almost transparent. In some areas of the United States the term prawn is loosely applied to any large shrimp. However, in Europe, only members of the genus Crangon, distinguished from other shrimp by a slender body and a depressed abdomen, are considered true shrimp, while decapod crustaceans having toothed beaks (rostrums), long antennae, slender legs, and laterally compressed abdomens are called prawns. Tropical shrimp have bizarre shapes and colors. One of the most unusual shrimp is the pistol shrimp, a burrow dweller whose third right appendage is adapted into a huge claw with a moveable finger that can be snapped shut with so much force that the resulting sound waves kill or stun nearby prey. Shrimp are widely distributed in temperate and tropical salt- and freshwaters. They may grow as long as 9 in. (23 cm), but most are smaller. They swim forward by paddling their abdominal swimmerets and can move backward with swift strokes of their fanlike tails. The common commercial shrimp, of the genus Peneus, is found in coastal waters from Virginia south. Shrimp flesh, which turns pink and white when cooked, is by far the most popular crustacean food and forms the basis of an important industry with centers in all the Gulf states, although most shrimp consumed in the United States are now imported. Shrimp are caught in large baglike nets that are dragged over the ocean floor, or may be raised in ponds on aquaculture farms. The flesh is canned in large quantities; fresh shrimp is packed in ice for shipping, or frozen and packaged. Dried shrimp is also common in Asia.


taken from encyclopedia.com