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user1111
03-25-2007, 02:09 PM
Inspired by HalleluYah whom I perceive as a nutrition Guru because he does the research but more importantly than that he applies it to himself!

Scanning the forum day in and day out I'm dumbfounded on the lack of basic nutrition knowledge. The reality is that basic nutrition is VERY simple to learn and apply. In application, you will certainly reach all your physique goals and more importantly learn how nutrition affects health!

You will increase the effectiveness of EVERY supplement 10 fold and more importantly, you learn that supplements just play a role in the total picture. You will learn the worth of every supplement that you apply to your nutrition.

HalleluYAH what a Meal Plan!
7:00 - 3/4 cups oats, 40g WPI, 1 banana, 1 cup skim milk, 12 almonds
9:30 - 1/2-3/4 cup oats, 1 apple, 28 peanuts, 1 can tuna, 1tbsp lf mayo.
12:30 -3/4 cup oats, 3-5 oz lean turkey/chicken, 12 almonds, .5-1.0 cup sweet peas
3:30 - 3/4 cup oats, 1 chicken breast, 1/2 cup broccoli, 28 peanuts
5:30 - Begin Workout
5:30-6:40 - 6-8 scoops Xtend w/H20.
6:40 - Conclude Workout
7:30 - 3/4 cup oats, 1-2 tbsp maple syrup, 1 chicken breast, 1/2 cup broccoli, 28 peanuts
10:00 - 30-50g WPI plus 6-8 tsp natty PB plus 1/2 cup broccoli.

The above diet belongs to HalleluYAH. He is his own diet Guru. The only way to EVER understand if a supplement is worth its weight in gold is to take a page out of HalleluYAH's book!

Before you waste another cent on a supplement, the HalleluYAH "what a meal plan" is the best supplement you can EVER LEARN!!!

Do you know the answers to these questions?

1. What is the physiological role of protein?
2. What is the physiological role of carbohydrates?
3. What is the physiological role of Fats?
4. What is the physiological difference between complex and simple carbohydrates?
5. What is the physiological difference between Saturated, monounsaturated polyunsaturated, and Omega-3 fats?
6. What is the physiological difference between Protein sources?
7. What is the importance of Nutritional timing?

Nutrition basics:
1gram protein=4 calories
1gram carbohydrate=4 calories
1gram fat=9 calories

I ask ANYONE to add as much knowledge to this thread as possible.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 02:27 PM
I ask ANYONE to add as much knowledge to this thread as possible.

To add "as much knowledge as possible," on the concept, science, and application of proteins, carbs, fats, and micronutrients, as well as water and fiber, this thread wouldn't end.

The basics are the route of advanced complex details when devising a nutrition plan. From the basics the more and more you study and develop on a small area, the more complex it will get.

The way your coming across, it almost seems as if your advertising.

And by the way, since you are making yourself appear more knowledgeable then anyone else in here is, then why is your thread severly lacking in detail. Do you even know as much as you claim to?

user1111
03-25-2007, 02:41 PM
To add "as much knowledge as possible," on the concept, science, and application of proteins, carbs, fats, and micronutrients, as well as water and fiber, this thread wouldn't end.

The basics are the route of advanced complex details when devising a nutrition plan. From the basics the more and more you study and develop on a small area, the more complex it will get.

The way your coming across, it almost seems as if your advertising.

And by the way, since you are making yourself appear more knowledgeable then anyone else in here is, then why is your thread severly lacking in detail. Do you even know as much as you claim to?

what am I adverising?

The idea is not to dive into the complexity that drives the novice from understanding nutrition. The idea is understand basic principles of nutrition. The idea is to simplify nutrition and than the complexity slowly start to make sense.

I have a degree in sports and clinical nutrition.

GeneGnomeX
03-25-2007, 02:49 PM
I have a degree in sports and clinical nutrition.

Then why not add your knowledge? It should be more reliable than a general forum frequenter.

user1111
03-25-2007, 02:55 PM
Then why not add your knowledge? It should be more reliable than a general forum frequenter.

Teaching nutrition is tricky, but from experience, I've learned its better taught through examples and not formulas. You seed a question to sprout interest and conversation. I posted key questions to help the converstation. If you spark interest you capture an audience that wants to learn. There are different learning styles.

Why not contribute instead of critique?

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:04 PM
Testosterone Boosting Foods:
1. Eggs (cholesterol)
2. Chicken
3. Beef
4. Oysters (zinc)
5. Garlic (allicin)
6. Tomato (lycopene)
__________________________
Estrogen Inhibiting Foods:
1. Broccoli (indole-3-carbinol)
2. Cabbage (indole-3-carbinol)
__________________________
Creatine Containing Foods:
1. Steak
2. Beef
3. Fish
__________________________
Lecithin Containing Foods:
1. Eggs
2. Liver
3. Cavier
4. Cabbage
5. Cauliflower
6. Soybeans
7. Lentils
8. Rice
________________________________
Higher Net Dextrose Containing Foods:
1. Peach
2. Cherry
3. Gatorade
4. Pixie sticks
5. Smarties
_________________________________
High GI Foods:
1. Dextrose
2. Gatorade
3. Fruit Juices
4. Potatoes
5. Pasta
6. Candy
__________________________________
Low GI Carbs:
1. Frutis
2. Vegetables
3. Whole wheat foods
4. Whole grain foods
5. Brown rice
6. Oats
__________________________________
Simple Carbs:
1. Gatorade
2. Fruits
3. Juice
4. Sports drinks
5. Milk
6. Alcohol
7. Honey
8. Most candy
___________________________________
Complex Carbs:
1. Vegetables
2. Whole wheat foods
3. Whole grain foods
4. Rice
5. Pasta
6. Potatoes
7. Bran
8. Oats
__________________________________________________ ____________


Food %Protein by Weight %Net Protein Utilization

Eggs (whole) 12 94
Milk 4 82
Fish 18-25 80
Cheese 22-36 70
Brown rice 8 70
Meat and fowl 19-31 68
Soybean flour 42 61
__________________________________________________ _______________

Food Protein Rating

Eggs (whole) 100
Fish 70
Lean beef 69
Milk 60
Brown rice 57
White rice 56
Soybeans 47
Whole-grain wheat 44
Peanuts 43
Dry beans 34
White potato 34
__________________________________________________ _______________

Complete proteins: Eggs, milk, meat, fish, and soybeans.
Incomplete proteins: Most vegetables, nuts and seeds, breads, and beans.

Food Combining to Make Complete Proteins

Grains plus seeds

Breads with added seed meals
Breads with sesame or sunflower seed spread
Rice with sesame seeds

Grains plus Milk Products

Cereal with milk
Pasta with milk or cheese
Bread with milk or cheese

Grains plus Legumes

Rice and beans
Wheat bread and baked beans
Corn soy or wheat-soy bread
Legume soup with bread.
___________________________________________
Amino Acid Requirement Formula - based on 1g/lb of bodyweight

Amino Acid Requirements in mg/lb
__________________________________________________ _______________
Histidine 13.8-19.4
Isoleucine 16.6
Leucine 22.2
Lysine 19.4
Methionine 22.2
Phenylalanine 22.2
Threonine 11.1
Tryptophan 5.5
Valine 16.6
__________________________________________________ _______________

Carbohydrates: Simple & Complex

Simple Carbs:
Monosaccharides: Glucose, fructose, galactose.
Disaccharides: Sucrose, maltose, lactose.

Complex Carbs:
Polysaccharides: Starch, cellulose, glycogen.
___________________________________________

The Fiber in Frutis and Vegetables
__________________________________________________ _________
Serving Size Calories Fiber in grams
Fruits
__________________________________________________ _________

Apple 1 medium 81 3.0
Banana 1 medium 105 1.8
Cherries 10 49 1.1
Kiwi 1 medium 46 2.6
Orange 1 medium 65 2.3
Peach 1 medium 37 1.4
Pear 1 medium 98 4.3
Raisons 2/3 cups 296 5.3
Strawberries 1 cup 45 3.9
__________________________________________________ _______________

Vegetables

Broccoli 1/2 cup 22 2.0
Brussel sprouts 1/2 cup 30 3.4
Carrots 1/2 cup 35 1.5
Cauliflower 1/2 cup 12 1.2
Green beans 1/2 cup 22 1.1
Kidney beans 1 cup 225 6.4
Iceberg lettuce 1 leaf 3 0.2
Romaine lettuce 1/2 cup 4 0.5
Parsnips 1/2 cup 63 2.1
Peas 1/2 cup 67 2.2
Potato (with skin) 1 medium 220 3.3
Spinach 1/2 cup 21 2.0
Sweet potato (with skin)1 medium 118 3.4
Tomato 1 medium 26 1.6
__________________________________________________ ______________


Vitamins Safe Daily Dosage Range
__________________________________________________ _______________
Vitamin A 5,000-25,000 IU
B Vitamins:
Thiamin (Vitamin B1) 2-100 mg
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) 50-100 mg
Niacin (Vitamin B3) 20-100 mg
Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) 4-7 mg
Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) 3-50 mg
Biotin (Vitamin B7) 30-100 mcg
Folic acid (Vitamin B9) 800 mcg-2,000 mcg
Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) 500-1,000 mcg
Vitamin C 500-2,000 mg
Vitamin D 400-600 IU
Vitamin E 200-400 IU
================================================== =======
Minerals Safe Daily Dosage Range
__________________________________________________ _______________
Calcium 1,000-1,500 mg
Chloride 750 mg (RDA)
Copper 1.5-3.0 mg
Chromium 50-200 mcg
Iodine 150mcg (RDA)
Iron 15-30 mg
Magnesium 300-500 mg
Manganese 2.5-5.0 mg
Molybdenum 75-250 mcg
Phosphorus 700 mg (RDA)
Potassium 2,000-3,500 mg
Selenium 70-200 mcg
Sodium 500-2,400mg (RDA)
Zinc 15-50 mg
__________________________________________________ _______________

1.) Arnold Schwarzenegger - New Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
Protein rating & NPU Table:
Protein Combining - Complete vs. Incomplete Tables

2.) Alan H. Pressman
Vitamin and mineral SAI & RDA tables
Fiber Chart

Dave P
03-25-2007, 03:04 PM
I'll take a crack at it. For the record most of the "science" sounding talk is from Alans book so I dont get credit for it. Its an awesome read for those really trying to get into the science of nutrition rather than just getting a layed out diet plan.

1. What is the physiological role of protein? Physical integrity of contractile and connective tissue, catalyzing chemical reactions by binding with correspondent substrates, carrying substances to respective tissues on demand, acting as a metabolic switch (insulin/glucagon), controling enzyme activity, providing antibodies, and acting as a synergist with carbohydrate for the goal of muscle proetin synthesis.

2. What is the physiological role of carbohydrates? Providing energy for cellular functions and providing fuel for the brain, nervous system, and skeletal muscle.

3. What is the physiological role of Fats? Fats play a large role in a multitude of bodily functions. It serves as a backup energy store, promotes healthy cell functions, and helps in healthy joint/ligament functions just to name a few.

4. What is the physiological difference between complex and simple carbohydrates? Simple carbs are your Mono/Oligo-saccharides (generally referred to as sugars) and include your glucose, fructose, sucrose, lactose, maltose etc... They are rapidly broken down, digested, and absorbed. I believe (correct me if im wrong) they are one 6 carbon molecule.

Complex carbs are your polysachharides. Your starches, glycogen, and cellulose. Starches being grain products/starchy vegetables and cellulose being your indegestable fiber. They have a much rounder micronutrient content than your simple carbs. Complex carbohydrates have more of these 6 carbon molecules linked together which require more "breaking down" (once again correct me if im wrong im not entirely sure of the chemical makeup).

5. What is the physiological difference between Saturated, monounsaturated polyunsaturated, and Omega-3 fats? Unsaturated fats with a single double bond on the carbon chain are monounsaturated, two or more double bonds constitute polyunsaturated, and saturated fats have no double bonds, are more structurally stable, and are solid at room temperature. (Not sure what you were really asking here).

6. What is the physiological difference between Protein sources? Once again not really sure what you're looking for here. Different protein sources are more or less "biologically available" for use and have different amino acid profiles. By using a multitude of sources you are guaranteeing you get your required balance of aminos. Whey for example has a high level of BCAA's and sulfer-containing aminos while Casein has more of the aromatic aminos.

7. What is the importance of Nutritional timing? Different times of the day require different inputs for optimal results. Upon waking your body will be leaning towards lean partitioning, energy conversion, instead of fat storage. When you're training carbs ingested immediatly preworkout are now being absorbed and released into circulation. Most will be used for active metabolism and some will be driven into lean tissues. Postworkout the majority of pre-workout carbs have been oxidized thus a shuttling of carbs to restore glycogen stores is preferred. When you're resting some food will be stored as fat, some stored in the muscle, and some coverted to heat. The nutrients are partitioned for overall bodily functions. Nutrient timing is more important with lower meal frequencies, greater caloric defecits, and the presence and magnitude of exercise.


So thats my shot at being one of Alan's students.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:08 PM
Sorry if my above post looks a little messy. When I was done typing it, it looked fine, but when you post something, it will automatically delete spaces after the first one.

By the way, theres more that I would like to add. I will add something taht I am using as the basis for the design of my nutrition program, although my data for my program is subject to change.

In my next post I will paste what I am using as the basis for my program.

Thanks.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:11 PM
Nutrient Timing:

Morning:
Solid meal
Low GI carbs
Complex carbs
Dietary fiber
Monounsaturated fats
Coenzyme Q10: 7.5g
Complete Proteins, slow digesting: Casein. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.

Pre-workout:
Solid meal
Medium GI carbs
Complex carbs
Iron
Zinc
Lycopene
Acillin
Cholesterol
Indole-3-carbinol
Coenzyme Q10: 7.5g
Lecithin
Potassium
Complete Proteins, slow digesting: Casein. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.

Post-workout:
Liquid meal
High GI carbs
Simple carbs
Higher net dextrose content
Antioxidants: Vitamin C & Vitamin E.
Creatine.
Complete proteins, fast digesting: Whey. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.

Bedtime:
Solid meal
Dietary fats: Any
Complex carbs
Complete Proteins, slow digesting. Casein. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.
Vitamins & Minerals. Specifically zinc.
Acillin
Indole-3-carbinol
Lecithin
______________________________________

Meal Plan - Food Consumption Requirements:

Allicin
Quercetin
Indole-3-carbinol
Lycopene
Xanthophylls: Lutein and zeaxanthin
Catechins: 1875 mg.
Resveratol: 800 mcg
Citrus Flavonoids: 2,000 to 6,000 mg
Isoflavones: 20-50mg
Dietary Fiber: 30g
Fish oil: 5 to 15g with 1g garlic.
1,000 mg calcium per day. Take dairy with bran.
Vitamin C: 1,000-2,000 mg
Vitamin E: 200-400 IU or 133-267 mg.
Nicotinic acid (niacin): 2 to 3g
Potassium: 3500 mg
Magnesium: 500 mg
Zinc: 50 mg
Three garlic cloves & three parsley sprigs
Tofu: 1/2 cup
Peanuts: 1 lb
Sardines: 1/2 lb
Oats must contain 0.75g of soluble fiber and total about >3g.
_________________________________

GeneGnomeX
03-25-2007, 03:11 PM
Teaching nutrition is tricky, but from experience, I've learned its better taught through examples and not formulas. You seed a question to sprout interest and conversation. I posted key questions to help the converstation. If you spark interest you capture an audience that wants to learn. There are different learning styles.

Why not contribute instead of critique?

Because I don't feel there is nearly enough data to define a perfect diet or even close to one. I think there are certainly guidelines to follow, whole grains, inclusion of sufficient vegetables, etc but in the long run it seems that something as specific as Hal's example is excessive and frankly a waste of time. I will never count out or weigh my food and yes nutrition is my degree (in progress which is why I do not comment much on nutrition). It is clear that genetics is the major defining factor of health in the late years (IMHO), and although a sound diet will influence quality of life and possibly extend it from prevention of disease, the future of life extension lies in genetic modification and or drugs. The emphasis should be variety (I feel food should be frequently changed based on my own research), and the emphasis on whole and nutrient dense foods. I honestly don't even take a multivitamin most days as I am unconvinced that it will do more good than harm yet (variables including manufacturer quality control).

Entire libraries could be filled with nutrition knowledge and a single thread is not going to do justice, and quite frankly most of the people who post on this board are insulting to nutrition professionals.

user1111
03-25-2007, 03:12 PM
I'll take a crack at it. For the record most of the "science" sounding talk is from Alans book so I dont get credit for it. Its an awesome read for those really trying to get into the science of nutrition rather than just getting a layed out diet plan.

1. What is the physiological role of protein? Physical integrity of contractile and connective tissue, catalyzing chemical reactions by binding with correspondent substrates, carrying substances to respective tissues on demand, acting as a metabolic switch (insulin/glucagon), controling enzyme activity, providing antibodies, and acting as a synergist with carbohydrate for the goal of muscle proetin synthesis.

2. What is the physiological role of carbohydrates? Providing energy for cellular functions and providing fuel for the brain, nervous system, and skeletal muscle.

3. What is the physiological role of Fats? Fats play a large role in a multitude of bodily functions. It serves as a backup energy store, promotes healthy cell functions, and helps in healthy joint/ligament functions just to name a few.

4. What is the physiological difference between complex and simple carbohydrates? Simple carbs are your Mono/Oligo-saccharides (generally referred to as sugars) and include your glucose, fructose, sucrose, lactose, maltose etc... They are rapidly broken down, digested, and absorbed. I believe (correct me if im wrong) they are one 6 carbon molecule.

Complex carbs are your polysachharides. Your starches, glycogen, and cellulose. Starches being grain products/starchy vegetables and cellulose being your indegestable fiber. They have a much rounder micronutrient content than your simple carbs. Complex carbohydrates have more of these 6 carbon molecules linked together which require more "breaking down" (once again correct me if im wrong im not entirely sure of the chemical makeup).

5. What is the physiological difference between Saturated, monounsaturated polyunsaturated, and Omega-3 fats? Unsaturated fats with a single double bond on the carbon chain are monounsaturated, two or more double bonds constitute polyunsaturated, and saturated fats have no double bonds, are more structurally stable, and are solid at room temperature. (Not sure what you were really asking here).

6. What is the physiological difference between Protein sources? Once again not really sure what you're looking for here. Different protein sources are more or less "biologically available" for use and have different amino acid profiles. By using a multitude of sources you are guaranteeing you get your required balance of aminos. Whey for example has a high level of BCAA's and sulfer-containing aminos while Casein has more of the aromatic aminos.

7. What is the importance of Nutritional timing? Different times of the day require different inputs for optimal results. Upon waking your body will be leaning towards lean partitioning, energy conversion, instead of fat storage. When you're training carbs ingested immediatly preworkout are now being absorbed and released into circulation. Most will be used for active metabolism and some will be driven into lean tissues. Postworkout the majority of pre-workout carbs have been oxidized thus a shuttling of carbs to restore glycogen stores is preferred. When you're resting some food will be stored as fat, some stored in the muscle, and some coverted to heat. The nutrients are partitioned for overall bodily functions. Nutrient timing is more important with lower meal frequencies, greater caloric defecits, and the presence and magnitude of exercise.


So thats my shot at being one of Alan's students.

How has Alan's book contributed to improving your physique? Funny how all my questions are in Alan's book. Nutritionist think alike?

Question 6: Understanding the digestiability and quality of protein aids in supplement timing. For example, in a perfect world you can eat as scheduled but many times life gets in the way of nutrition. You workout at 5pm, but you have not eaten since 12pm because your kid got sick and you're stuck at the doc's office, but you need to make the gym at 5pm and its 4pm. What are you going to eat to fuel a productive workout? What are you going to eat that will digest quickly and not cause digestion issues during a workout?

user1111
03-25-2007, 03:15 PM
I will add something taht I am using as the basis for the design of my nutrition program, although my data for my program is subject to change.

In my next post I will paste what I am using as the basis for my program.

Thanks.

Subject to change! what a great statement! Without understanding nutrition you(the user) will never have the ability to change diets when your goals change.

Great input!

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:15 PM
I have a degree in sports and clinical nutrition.

I think your full of crap. Don't take it as an insult. You know that you are lying.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:17 PM
Subject to change! what a great statement! Without understanding nutrition you will never have the ability to change diets when your goals change.

Great input!

How do you figure I dont understand nutrition? I probably know more then you. Bring it on.

user1111
03-25-2007, 03:18 PM
I think your full of crap. Don't take it as an insult. You know that you are lying.

I'll post a picture of my degree to convince. I have no reasons to lie. I have a BA in Human sciences.

user1111
03-25-2007, 03:19 PM
How do you figure I dont understand nutrition? I probably know more then you. Bring it on.

It was a compliment.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:20 PM
It was a compliment.

Sounded more like sarcasm to me.

user1111
03-25-2007, 03:23 PM
Sounded more like sarcasm to me.

OO man

Great feedback. The point was that you understand that nutrition must change when goals change hence "what a great statement" comment.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:25 PM
The reason I said that my program was still subject to change is because I havn't set up all the guidelines yet to route the basis and construction of my food plan on. I usually take my morning meal, pre/post-workout meal, and bedtime meal to work out first. Then everything else falls into place, followed by after completion a little tweaking of the diet.

Several factors and variables need to be taken into consideration and implicated before the equation can solved.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:29 PM
Just to clarify on the whole Coenzyme Q10 topic. I don't take supplements to get my coenzyme Q10, I take half a pound of sardines, followed by a pound of peanuts spread out throughout to day to meet the 30g of CoQ10.

Incase anyone was curious.

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:32 PM
I'll post a picture of my degree to convince. I have no reasons to lie. I have a BA in Human sciences.

Still waiting.

Dave P
03-25-2007, 03:33 PM
Strong E-Peen flexing in this thread.

user1111
03-25-2007, 03:37 PM
Still waiting.

Are you serious? you want me to post a picture. LOL, I have to wait for my lady to come home with the digital, and I'll get it right up.

What is your degree in?

24/7 Study
03-25-2007, 03:40 PM
If you did have a degree then why wouldn't you have your profile updated with your occupation and other info?

I don't have a degree, I am studying to get one.

Do you study endocrinology, biochemistry, biology, or kinesiology at all also? Most importantly the first two I listed. Just curious.

user1111
03-25-2007, 03:47 PM
If you did have a degree then why wouldn't you have your profile updated with your occupation and other info?

I don't have a degree, I am studying to get one.

Do you study endocrinology, biochemistry, biology, or kinesiology at all also? Most importantly the first two I listed. Just curious.

Profile? What do you mean?

To get a degree in nutrition you have to take human anatomy and physiology 1 and 2, Nutrtional biochemistry 1 and 2, 3 biologies and 2 chems classes. I took additional course in exercise physiology to focus on sport nutrition. I hate the hospital setting.

anabolistic69
03-25-2007, 03:58 PM
Profile? What do you mean?

To get a degree in nutrition you have to take human anatomy and physiology 1 and 2, Nutrtional biochemistry 1 and 2, 3 biologies and 2 chems classes. I took additional course in exercise physiology to focus on sport nutrition. I hate the hospital setting.

Are you a bodybuilder?

Stonecoldtruth
03-25-2007, 04:01 PM
Profile? What do you mean?


I think he means that your bodyspace/signature/profile don't reflect your occupation. You aren't in the supplement section anymore, thus nobody knows who you are and what you do... you gotta earn your cred here. :)

Love,
SCT

user1111
03-25-2007, 04:11 PM
I think he means that your bodyspace/signature/profile don't reflect your occupation. You aren't in the supplement section anymore, thus nobody knows who you are and what you do... you gotta earn your cred here. :)

Love,
SCT

Great, I'll try my best to earn my stripes!

user1111
03-25-2007, 04:12 PM
Are you a bodybuilder?

No, I lift and eat for performance. I practice brazilian jiu jitsu and submission grappling so I train specifically for performance.

Stonecoldtruth
03-25-2007, 04:12 PM
Great, I try my best to earn my stripes!

I wasn't implying that you haven't earned them elsewhere, just that the nutrition section is an entirely different animal. At least you didn't post this in the Keto section though, that would have been a massacre.

SCT

GeneGnomeX
03-25-2007, 04:39 PM
I wasn't implying that you haven't earned them elsewhere, just that the nutrition section is an entirely different animal. At least you didn't post this in the Keto section though, that would have been a massacre.

SCT

I'd be crabby too if I didn't get my carbs.

Stonecoldtruth
03-25-2007, 04:43 PM
I'd be crabby too if I didn't get my carbs.

Carbs are like sex.. only important if you aren't getting any.

alan aragon
03-25-2007, 08:49 PM
1. What is the physiological role of protein? Physical integrity of contractile and connective tissue, catalyzing chemical reactions by binding with correspondent substrates, carrying substances to respective tissues on demand, acting as a metabolic switch (insulin/glucagon), controling enzyme activity, providing antibodies, and acting as a synergist with carbohydrate for the goal of muscle proetin synthesis.

2. What is the physiological role of carbohydrates? Providing energy for cellular functions and providing fuel for the brain, nervous system, and skeletal muscle.

3. What is the physiological role of Fats? Fats play a large role in a multitude of bodily functions. It serves as a backup energy store, promotes healthy cell functions, and helps in healthy joint/ligament functions just to name a few.

4. What is the physiological difference between complex and simple carbohydrates? Simple carbs are your Mono/Oligo-saccharides (generally referred to as sugars) and include your glucose, fructose, sucrose, lactose, maltose etc... They are rapidly broken down, digested, and absorbed. I believe (correct me if im wrong) they are one 6 carbon molecule.

Complex carbs are your polysachharides. Your starches, glycogen, and cellulose. Starches being grain products/starchy vegetables and cellulose being your indegestable fiber. They have a much rounder micronutrient content than your simple carbs. Complex carbohydrates have more of these 6 carbon molecules linked together which require more "breaking down" (once again correct me if im wrong im not entirely sure of the chemical makeup).

5. What is the physiological difference between Saturated, monounsaturated polyunsaturated, and Omega-3 fats? Unsaturated fats with a single double bond on the carbon chain are monounsaturated, two or more double bonds constitute polyunsaturated, and saturated fats have no double bonds, are more structurally stable, and are solid at room temperature. (Not sure what you were really asking here).

6. What is the physiological difference between Protein sources? Once again not really sure what you're looking for here. Different protein sources are more or less "biologically available" for use and have different amino acid profiles. By using a multitude of sources you are guaranteeing you get your required balance of aminos. Whey for example has a high level of BCAA's and sulfer-containing aminos while Casein has more of the aromatic aminos.

7. What is the importance of Nutritional timing? Different times of the day require different inputs for optimal results. Upon waking your body will be leaning towards lean partitioning, energy conversion, instead of fat storage. When you're training carbs ingested immediatly preworkout are now being absorbed and released into circulation. Most will be used for active metabolism and some will be driven into lean tissues. Postworkout the majority of pre-workout carbs have been oxidized thus a shuttling of carbs to restore glycogen stores is preferred. When you're resting some food will be stored as fat, some stored in the muscle, and some coverted to heat. The nutrients are partitioned for overall bodily functions. Nutrient timing is more important with lower meal frequencies, greater caloric defecits, and the presence and magnitude of exercise.


So thats my shot at being one of Alan's students.Goddamn that was excellent, Dave. Glad you like the book.. :D

*J-Walk*
03-25-2007, 11:39 PM
Nutrient Timing:

Morning:
Solid meal
Low GI carbs
Complex carbs
Dietary fiber
Monounsaturated fats
Coenzyme Q10: 7.5g
Complete Proteins, slow digesting: Casein. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.

Pre-workout:
Solid meal
Medium GI carbs
Complex carbs
Iron
Zinc
Lycopene
Acillin
Cholesterol
Indole-3-carbinol
Coenzyme Q10: 7.5g
Lecithin
Potassium
Complete Proteins, slow digesting: Casein. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.

Post-workout:
Liquid meal
High GI carbs
Simple carbs
Higher net dextrose content
Antioxidants: Vitamin C & Vitamin E.
Creatine.
Complete proteins, fast digesting: Whey. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.

Bedtime:
Solid meal
Dietary fats: Any
Complex carbs
Complete Proteins, slow digesting. Casein. High BV, NPU, and PDCAAS.
Vitamins & Minerals. Specifically zinc.
Acillin
Indole-3-carbinol
Lecithin
______________________________________

Meal Plan - Food Consumption Requirements:

Allicin
Quercetin
Indole-3-carbinol
Lycopene
Xanthophylls: Lutein and zeaxanthin
Catechins: 1875 mg.
Resveratol: 800 mcg
Citrus Flavonoids: 2,000 to 6,000 mg
Isoflavones: 20-50mg
Dietary Fiber: 30g
Fish oil: 5 to 15g with 1g garlic.
1,000 mg calcium per day. Take dairy with bran.
Vitamin C: 1,000-2,000 mg
Vitamin E: 200-400 IU or 133-267 mg.
Nicotinic acid (niacin): 2 to 3g
Potassium: 3500 mg
Magnesium: 500 mg
Zinc: 50 mg
Three garlic cloves & three parsley sprigs
Tofu: 1/2 cup
Peanuts: 1 lb
Sardines: 1/2 lb
Oats must contain 0.75g of soluble fiber and total about >3g.
_________________________________


so you covered what should be consumed now can you tell me the foods to consume that would match those demands?

24/7 Study
03-26-2007, 01:19 AM
so you covered what should be consumed now can you tell me the foods to consume that would match those demands?

I guess, if you want.

I wasn't really going to add it, because I am using this as a guideline for my nutrition program. If you want though, then I guess I can add it.

24/7 Study
03-26-2007, 01:49 AM
1.) Solid vs. liquid meals is self-explanatory.

Low GI Carbs:
1. Fruits
2. Vegetables
3. Whole wheat foods
4. Whole grain foods
5. Brown rice
6. Oats

High GI Carbs:
1. Dextrose
2. Gatorade
3. Fruit juices
4. Potatoes
5. Pasta
6. Most Candy (not reccomended)

Simple Carbs:
1. Gatorade
2. Fruits
3. Juice
4. Sports drinks
5. Milk
6. Alcohol (dont reccomend)
7. Honey
8. Candy

Complex Carbs:
1. Vegetables
2. Whole wheat foods
3. Whole grain foods
4. Rice
5. Oats.
6. Pasta
7. Potatoes
8. Bran

Dietary Fiber:
1. Apples
2. Carrots
3. Cauliflower
4. Corn
5. Oat bran
6. Oatmeal
7. Pears
8. Citrus fruits

Monounsaturated fats:
1. Olive oil

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10):
*1. Sardines
*2. Peanuts
3. Tuna
4. Mackrel
5. Beef
6. Canola oil
7. Wheat germ
8. Tofu

Casein:
1. Dairy products

Iron:
1. Ground beef
2. Whole wheat bread
3. Kidney beans
4. Oysters
5. Spinach
6. chicken

Zinc:
*1. Oysters
2. Egg
3. Ground beef
4. Kidney beans
5. Oatmeal
6. Walnuts

Lycopene:
1. Tomato
2. Ketchup
3. Pink grapefruit
4. Watermelon

Acillin:
1. Garlic

Cholesterol:
1. Eggs

Vitamin C:
1. Several frutis

Vitamin E:
1. Almonds, dry roasted
2. Apple
3. Peanuts
4. Sunflower seeds
5. Sweet potato
6. Avocado

Creatine:
1. Steak
2. Beef
3. Fish

Higher net dextrose foods:
1. Gatorade
2. Cherry
3. Peach
4. Pixie sticks
5. Smarties

Indole-3-carbinol:
1. Broccoli
2. Cabbage

Lecithin:
*1. Eggs
2. Liver
3. Cavier
4. Cabbage
5. Cauliflower
*6. Soybeans
7. Lentils
8. Rice

Potassium:
1. Avocado
2. Banana
3. Ground beef
4. Broccoli
5. Kidney beans
6. Milk
7. Spinach
*8. Potato

Xanthophylls:
1. Kiwi

Quercetin:
1. Onion

Resveratol:
*1. Red whine
*2. Peanuts
3. Red and purple grape skin

Isoflavones:
1. Tofu
2. Soybeans

HalleluYAH
03-26-2007, 05:34 AM
Testosterone Boosting Foods:
1. Eggs (cholesterol)
2. Chicken
3. Beef
4. Oysters (zinc)
5. Garlic (allicin)
6. Tomato (lycopene)
__________________________
Estrogen Inhibiting Foods:
1. Broccoli (indole-3-carbinol)
2. Cabbage (indole-3-carbinol)
__________________________
Creatine Containing Foods:
1. Steak
2. Beef
3. Fish
__________________________
Lecithin Containing Foods:
1. Eggs
2. Liver
3. Cavier
4. Cabbage
5. Cauliflower
6. Soybeans
7. Lentils
8. Rice
________________________________
Higher Net Dextrose Containing Foods:
1. Peach
2. Cherry
3. Gatorade
4. Pixie sticks
5. Smarties
_________________________________
High GI Foods:
1. Dextrose
2. Gatorade
3. Fruit Juices
4. Potatoes
5. Pasta
6. Candy
__________________________________
Low GI Carbs:
1. Frutis
2. Vegetables
3. Whole wheat foods
4. Whole grain foods
5. Brown rice
6. Oats
__________________________________
Simple Carbs:
1. Gatorade
2. Fruits
3. Juice
4. Sports drinks
5. Milk
6. Alcohol
7. Honey
8. Most candy
___________________________________
Complex Carbs:
1. Vegetables
2. Whole wheat foods
3. Whole grain foods
4. Rice
5. Pasta
6. Potatoes
7. Bran
8. Oats
__________________________________________________ ____________


Food %Protein by Weight %Net Protein Utilization

Eggs (whole) 12 94
Milk 4 82
Fish 18-25 80
Cheese 22-36 70
Brown rice 8 70
Meat and fowl 19-31 68
Soybean flour 42 61
__________________________________________________ _______________

Food Protein Rating

Eggs (whole) 100
Fish 70
Lean beef 69
Milk 60
Brown rice 57
White rice 56
Soybeans 47
Whole-grain wheat 44
Peanuts 43
Dry beans 34
White potato 34
__________________________________________________ _______________

Complete proteins: Eggs, milk, meat, fish, and soybeans.
Incomplete proteins: Most vegetables, nuts and seeds, breads, and beans.

Food Combining to Make Complete Proteins

Grains plus seeds

Breads with added seed meals
Breads with sesame or sunflower seed spread
Rice with sesame seeds

Grains plus Milk Products

Cereal with milk
Pasta with milk or cheese
Bread with milk or cheese

Grains plus Legumes

Rice and beans
Wheat bread and baked beans
Corn soy or wheat-soy bread
Legume soup with bread.
___________________________________________
Amino Acid Requirement Formula - based on 1g/lb of bodyweight

Amino Acid Requirements in mg/lb
__________________________________________________ _______________
Histidine 13.8-19.4
Isoleucine 16.6
Leucine 22.2
Lysine 19.4
Methionine 22.2
Phenylalanine 22.2
Threonine 11.1
Tryptophan 5.5
Valine 16.6
__________________________________________________ _______________

Carbohydrates: Simple & Complex

Simple Carbs:
Monosaccharides: Glucose, fructose, galactose.
Disaccharides: Sucrose, maltose, lactose.

Complex Carbs:
Polysaccharides: Starch, cellulose, glycogen.
___________________________________________

The Fiber in Frutis and Vegetables
__________________________________________________ _________
Serving Size Calories Fiber in grams
Fruits
__________________________________________________ _________

Apple 1 medium 81 3.0
Banana 1 medium 105 1.8
Cherries 10 49 1.1
Kiwi 1 medium 46 2.6
Orange 1 medium 65 2.3
Peach 1 medium 37 1.4
Pear 1 medium 98 4.3
Raisons 2/3 cups 296 5.3
Strawberries 1 cup 45 3.9
__________________________________________________ _______________

Vegetables

Broccoli 1/2 cup 22 2.0
Brussel sprouts 1/2 cup 30 3.4
Carrots 1/2 cup 35 1.5
Cauliflower 1/2 cup 12 1.2
Green beans 1/2 cup 22 1.1
Kidney beans 1 cup 225 6.4
Iceberg lettuce 1 leaf 3 0.2
Romaine lettuce 1/2 cup 4 0.5
Parsnips 1/2 cup 63 2.1
Peas 1/2 cup 67 2.2
Potato (with skin) 1 medium 220 3.3
Spinach 1/2 cup 21 2.0
Sweet potato (with skin)1 medium 118 3.4
Tomato 1 medium 26 1.6
__________________________________________________ ______________


Vitamins Safe Daily Dosage Range
__________________________________________________ _______________
Vitamin A 5,000-25,000 IU
B Vitamins:
Thiamin (Vitamin B1) 2-100 mg
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) 50-100 mg
Niacin (Vitamin B3) 20-100 mg
Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) 4-7 mg
Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) 3-50 mg
Biotin (Vitamin B7) 30-100 mcg
Folic acid (Vitamin B9) 800 mcg-2,000 mcg
Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) 500-1,000 mcg
Vitamin C 500-2,000 mg
Vitamin D 400-600 IU
Vitamin E 200-400 IU
================================================== =======
Minerals Safe Daily Dosage Range
__________________________________________________ _______________
Calcium 1,000-1,500 mg
Chloride 750 mg (RDA)
Copper 1.5-3.0 mg
Chromium 50-200 mcg
Iodine 150mcg (RDA)
Iron 15-30 mg
Magnesium 300-500 mg
Manganese 2.5-5.0 mg
Molybdenum 75-250 mcg
Phosphorus 700 mg (RDA)
Potassium 2,000-3,500 mg
Selenium 70-200 mcg
Sodium 500-2,400mg (RDA)
Zinc 15-50 mg
__________________________________________________ _______________

1.) Arnold Schwarzenegger - New Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
Protein rating & NPU Table:
Protein Combining - Complete vs. Incomplete Tables

2.) Alan H. Pressman
Vitamin and mineral SAI & RDA tables
Fiber Chart
Excellent information. Thank you for sharing.

24/7 Study
03-26-2007, 08:21 AM
Excellent information. Thank you for sharing.

No problem. I was glad to.

Forge3
03-26-2007, 08:25 AM
http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=1915911&referrerid=314325