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Skwidward
03-19-2007, 12:20 PM
It's a powerpoint presentation I'm doing for school, and I've aimed it at the overweight and obese. Seeing as I've gotten most of my info from what people have posted here, I figured maybe I could get some feed back.

My plan was to just provide a simple guideline for someone overweight or obese to follow to lose weight, but I think I got a bit complicated with all the BMR calulators. Also, I'm gonna up the weight of the women in the example.


Health and Nutrition for the Overweight and Obese

Health = A condition of physical, mental, and social well being and the absence of disease or other abnormal condition. (Mosby?s pg 783)

Nutrition = Nourishment. The sum of the process involved in the taking in of nutrients and their assimilation and use for proper body functioning and maintenance of health. (Mosbys)

Overweight = 11%-19% above desired body weight

Obese = 20% or more above desired body weight

Desired Body weight = The ideal body weight for optimum health.

How to determine desired body weight

For a medium sized Man ? 106 lbs for 5 ft of height, plus 6 lbs for each additional inch

For a medium sized Woman ? 100 lbs for 5 ft of height, plus 5 lbs for additional inch

For a small sized individual of either sex, subtract 10%

For a Large sized individual of either size, add 10% (Whites pg 311)

Example 1:

Medium Female : 5 ft 5 inches tall
5 ft = 100 lbs
5 in = 25 lbs Therefore, Desired weight = 125 lbs

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Overweight and Obesity is on the rise in the US. Data from two NHANES surveys show that among adults aged 20?74 years the prevalence of obesity increased from 15.0% (in the 1976?1980 survey) to 32.9% (in the 2003?2004 survey).

These same surveys also showed that for children aged 2?5 years, the prevalence of overweight increased from 5.0% to 13.9%; for those aged 6?11 years, prevalence increased from 6.5% to 18.8%; and for those aged 12?19 years, prevalence increased from 5.0% to 17.4%. (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/index.htm)

www.tdh.state.tx.us for statistics




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Major disease risks for the overweight and obese


? Hypertension
? Dyslipidemia (for example, high total cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides)
? Type II Diabetes
? Coronary Artery Disease
? Stroke
? Gallbladder disease
? Osteoarthritis
? Sleep apnea (periods of no breathing during sleep) and respiratory problems
? Some cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon)

According to the CDC, one of the national health objectives for the year 2010 ?is to reduce the prevalence of obesity among adults to less than 15%.? However, current data indicate that the situation is worsening rather than improving. (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/index.htm)

--------------------------------------------------------


How To Solve The Problem?

The formula is simple.

Proper nutrition + Proper exercise = Healthy weight

A vital variant in this simple equation is the Calorie (kcal).

Calorie (kcal) = The amount of heat (energy) needed to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram (approx 1 liter) of water 1? C. (Mosby?s pg 266)

The Calorie (kcal) is the value you see on all food nutrition labels. It basically gives a value of how much energy is contained in that food, and it is normally given per serving. Therefore, nutrition is concerned with Calories or energy that you put into your body.

We all know exercise requires us to expend energy. You run a mile, it takes a certain amount of energy. This energy expended can also be given a Caloric value. You run a mile, you ?burn? so many Calories. Even while at rest, your body ?burns? Calories just to keep you alive through activities such as breathing and digesting foods you?ve eaten, even thinking. The rate at which your body burns energy just to maintain itself at complete rest is called your basal metabolic rate (BMR). Therefore, exercise and BMR are concerned with Calories or energy that you use up or ?burn,? energy that leaves your body.

You can now see how the Calorie (kcal) is an integral part of this equation

Calories in (nutrition) + Calories expended (exercise, BMR) = Body weight

----------------------------------------------------------------

How Many Calories Should I be consuming?

Basal energy needs can be determined by this simple formula

(Female) Basal metabolic rate = weight in kg x 0.9 x 24
(Male) BMR = weight in kg x 1 x 24

(2.2lb = 1 kg)

Example 2:

Using a female whose actual weight is 125 lbs and the above formula

Weight in kg = 125 lbs ? 2.2
= 56.8 kg

Basal metabolic rate = 56.8 kg x 0.9 x 24
= 1226.9 Calories (kcal)

So for this medium sized woman to just stay alive at complete rest and maintain her present body weight, she must consume a total of 1226.9 Calories (kcal) per day.

Skwidward
03-19-2007, 12:22 PM
It's a powerpoint presentation I'm doing for school, and I've aimed it at the overweight and obese. Seeing as I've gotten most of my info from what people have posted here, I figured maybe I could get some feed back.

My plan was to just provide a simple guideline for someone overweight or obese to follow to lose weight, but I think I got a bit complicated with all the BMR calulators. Also, I'm gonna up the weight of the women in the example.


Health and Nutrition for the Overweight and Obese

Health = A condition of physical, mental, and social well being and the absence of disease or other abnormal condition. (Mosby?s pg 783)

Nutrition = Nourishment. The sum of the process involved in the taking in of nutrients and their assimilation and use for proper body functioning and maintenance of health. (Mosbys)

Overweight = 11%-19% above desired body weight

Obese = 20% or more above desired body weight

Desired Body weight = The ideal body weight for optimum health.

How to determine desired body weight

For a medium sized Man ? 106 lbs for 5 ft of height, plus 6 lbs for each additional inch

For a medium sized Woman ? 100 lbs for 5 ft of height, plus 5 lbs for additional inch

For a small sized individual of either sex, subtract 10%

For a Large sized individual of either size, add 10% (Whites pg 311)

Example 1:

Medium Female : 5 ft 5 inches tall
5 ft = 100 lbs
5 in = 25 lbs Therefore, Desired weight = 125 lbs

----------------------------------------------------------------


Overweight and Obesity is on the rise in the US. Data from two NHANES surveys show that among adults aged 20?74 years the prevalence of obesity increased from 15.0% (in the 1976?1980 survey) to 32.9% (in the 2003?2004 survey).

These same surveys also showed that for children aged 2?5 years, the prevalence of overweight increased from 5.0% to 13.9%; for those aged 6?11 years, prevalence increased from 6.5% to 18.8%; and for those aged 12?19 years, prevalence increased from 5.0% to 17.4%. (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/index.htm)

www.tdh.state.tx.us for statistics




---------------------------------------------------------------






Major disease risks for the overweight and obese


? Hypertension
? Dyslipidemia (for example, high total cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides)
? Type II Diabetes
? Coronary Artery Disease
? Stroke
? Gallbladder disease
? Osteoarthritis
? Sleep apnea (periods of no breathing during sleep) and respiratory problems
? Some cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon)

According to the CDC, one of the national health objectives for the year 2010 ?is to reduce the prevalence of obesity among adults to less than 15%.? However, current data indicate that the situation is worsening rather than improving. (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/index.htm)

--------------------------------------------------------


How To Solve The Problem?

The formula is simple.

Proper nutrition + Proper exercise = Healthy weight

A vital variant in this simple equation is the Calorie (kcal).

Calorie (kcal) = The amount of heat (energy) needed to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram (approx 1 liter) of water 1? C. (Mosby?s pg 266)

The Calorie (kcal) is the value you see on all food nutrition labels. It basically gives a value of how much energy is contained in that food, and it is normally given per serving. Therefore, nutrition is concerned with Calories or energy that you put into your body.

We all know exercise requires us to expend energy. You run a mile, it takes a certain amount of energy. This energy expended can also be given a Caloric value. You run a mile, you ?burn? so many Calories. Even while at rest, your body ?burns? Calories just to keep you alive through activities such as breathing and digesting foods you?ve eaten, even thinking. The rate at which your body burns energy just to maintain itself at complete rest is called your basal metabolic rate (BMR). Therefore, exercise and BMR are concerned with Calories or energy that you use up or ?burn,? energy that leaves your body.

You can now see how the Calorie (kcal) is an integral part of this equation

Calories in (nutrition) + Calories expended (exercise, BMR) = Body weight

----------------------------------------------------------------

How Many Calories Should I be consuming?

Basal energy needs can be determined by this simple formula

(Female) Basal metabolic rate = weight in kg x 0.9 x 24
(Male) BMR = weight in kg x 1 x 24

(2.2lb = 1 kg)

Example 2:

Using a female whose actual weight is 125 lbs and the above formula

Weight in kg = 125 lbs ? 2.2
= 56.8 kg

Basal metabolic rate = 56.8 kg x 0.9 x 24
= 1226.9 Calories (kcal)

So for this medium sized woman to just stay alive at complete rest and maintain her present body weight, she must consume a total of 1226.9 Calories (kcal) per day.