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livindagym
03-12-2018, 05:20 PM
On a lean bulk and have upped my carbs the past couple months. Ive watched a few vids where some suggest having low carb days here and there or couple times per week to prevent insulin resistance. Any truth to this?

neddo
03-12-2018, 06:12 PM
What's a lean bulk?

What were your carbs at? What are they at now?

It's likely hogwash, though context is important here.

formicaman
03-12-2018, 06:12 PM
As long as you don't have a reason to, I wouldn't read to much into it. You'll be fine.

livindagym
03-12-2018, 06:52 PM
What's a lean bulk?

What were your carbs at? What are they at now?

It's likely hogwash, though context is important here.


Atm i usually take in around 250-300 daily. Lean bulk as in aiming to go for slight surplus for as little fat gain as possible

ErikTheElectric
03-12-2018, 08:15 PM
On a lean bulk and have upped my carbs the past couple months. Ive watched a few vids where some suggest having low carb days here and there or couple times per week to prevent insulin resistance. Any truth to this?
Stop watching these videos.

Tigress84
03-13-2018, 02:00 AM
Resistance training is very effective in preventing insulin resistance.

SeanFxxx
03-13-2018, 08:46 AM
The only way to know for sure would be to get some bloodwork done to see if your fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, hemoglobin are out of whack which can be an indicator of insulin resistance. I see no issue with a low carb or fasting period to "reset" insulin sensitivity if you're concerned.

Heisman2
03-13-2018, 08:56 AM
The only way to know for sure would be to get some bloodwork done to see if your fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, hemoglobin are out of whack which can be an indicator of insulin resistance. I see no issue with a low carb or fasting period to "reset" insulin sensitivity if you're concerned.

Triglycerides and hemoglobin would be much less informative than an oral glucose tolerance test if curious. Neither low carb nor fasting for a short period will reset insulin resistance.

SeanFxxx
03-13-2018, 09:00 AM
Triglycerides and hemoglobin would be much less informative than an oral glucose tolerance test if curious. Neither low carb nor fasting for a short period will reset insulin resistance.

He's clearly someone who resistance trains though.

Heisman2
03-13-2018, 09:19 AM
He's clearly someone who resistance trains though.

I was just responding to that specific post. Nobody who eats a healthy diet and exercises regularly and has never been significantly overweight needs to worry about insulin resistance unless they have an unusual medical condition.

Plateauplower
03-13-2018, 09:33 AM
I was just responding to that specific post. Nobody who eats a healthy diet and exercises regularly and has never been significantly overweight needs to worry about insulin resistance unless they have an unusual medical condition.

Does "insulin resistance" correct itself for those who have been overweight and maintain a leaner body comp for awhile? Or is it more of a genetic factor that is not likely to change...Ie. insulin sensitivity would increase when leaner but would easily revert back iof fat is gained having somewhat of a snowball effect on fat gains. I've noticed my nutrient partitioning seems to change drastically at a certain "fatness" when chasing numbers. Bodycomp will stay decent as I gain until a certain point, almost everything past that point seems to be bodyfat. Obviously could be up against a genetic limit for additional muscle to some extent as well, but it seems like I should be able to eek some additional gains out when weights are increasing, but the mirror doesn't lie much...

Heisman2
03-13-2018, 12:38 PM
Does "insulin resistance" correct itself for those who have been overweight and maintain a leaner body comp for awhile? Or is it more of a genetic factor that is not likely to change...Ie. insulin sensitivity would increase when leaner but would easily revert back iof fat is gained having somewhat of a snowball effect on fat gains. I've noticed my nutrient partitioning seems to change drastically at a certain "fatness" when chasing numbers. Bodycomp will stay decent as I gain until a certain point, almost everything past that point seems to be bodyfat. Obviously could be up against a genetic limit for additional muscle to some extent as well, but it seems like I should be able to eek some additional gains out when weights are increasing, but the mirror doesn't lie much...

There are tons of studies showing weight loss improves insulin sensitivity. Here are two that I find more interesting (based on the abstracts, I haven't read either in full):

https://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/abs/10.1123/ijsnem.2015-0025
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413116300535

There is certainly also a large heritability component to obesity in general (40-80% or so depending on the study); I'd be shocked if there wasn't also a decent sized genetic effect on insulin resistance. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1464-5491.2002.00843.x/full

After regaining weight, it gets complicated. This study was unfortunately quite small but the discussion is good for highlighting some of the interesting findings: https://www.nature.com/articles/nutd201731

Lastly, in regards to nutrient partitioning for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, I don't know this literature very well but if you are at your genetic limit or close to it then it makes sense for additional muscle gains to be very slow. If you are say 10 pounds away from what you think your potential is then you may only be able to put on 1-2 pounds of muscle a year; any weight gain in addition to that will more likely be adipose tissue (other lean body mass will increase to some degree too). There is a fairly decent correlation between size/strength when one is past beginner gains, but this will also depend on your training style (if it's more hypertrophy vs strength/power based), form, changes in leverages, and other neuromuscular factors.

Plateauplower
03-13-2018, 03:03 PM
Thx for the links