PDA

View Full Version : Is Whole Milk fattening or bad for you?



DeAndreTheGOAT
12-29-2017, 09:02 AM
I know i know this is probably a dumb question but im just a little worried since im kinda new to all this still.

i just started maintaining after weight loss So i was gonna add Milk into my daily diet for breakfast because i have 100-200 calories left over in the day and i dont know what type of milk to add. Now i was always brought up being taught that Whole milk is "Fattening and bad for you" But recently i started doing more research on it and a lot of things say its better and healthier than 1%, 2%, and even skim.

So im wondering is Whole milk good? or should i just buy 1% or skim.

AdamWW
12-29-2017, 09:13 AM
100-200 calories of any of the above won't make any difference in terms of health or weight gain. It's a matter of calories consumed toward your goal.

rml27v
12-29-2017, 09:14 AM
It's all about calories.

AdamWW
12-29-2017, 09:23 AM
It's all about calories.

not quite... he was concerned about more than body composition, which should and does factor in the amount and contents on the food. But in his case, those 100-200 calories wouldn't matter.

rhadam
12-29-2017, 09:34 AM
I know i know this is probably a dumb question but im just a little worried since im kinda new to all this still.

i just started maintaining after weight loss So i was gonna add Milk into my daily diet for breakfast because i need to fill up that extra 100-200 calories and i dont know what type to add. Now i was always brought up being taught that Whole milk is "Fattening and bad for you" But recently i started doing more research on it and a lot of things say its better and healthier than 1%, 2%, and even skim.

So im wondering is Whole milk good? or should i just buy 1% or skim.

First, use the search function on the boards for basic questions like this. We have discussed this topic and many more ad nauseam.

No one food item can be bad for you or fattening. It is the context of your diet that determines health issues and weight gain/loss. Milk is not inherently bad. If it fits your macros, great. It is an excellent source of protein and omegas. Whether you want to drink whole milk, 2% or 1% is up to you. Determine the calorie level that works for your diet and go from there. The sooner you disabuse yourself with the terms good and bad in a dietary setting, the better off you'll be.

PBellFitness
12-30-2017, 06:04 AM
A type of food is not going to make you fat. It is how much energy you consume which will determine that. Whether you have 200 kcals from skimmed milk, or 200 kcals from whole it will make absolutely no difference to your fat loss/gain. I prefer to have skimmed because it allows me to consume more volume.

Mrpb
12-30-2017, 06:12 AM
I know i know this is probably a dumb question but im just a little worried since im kinda new to all this still.

i just started maintaining after weight loss So i was gonna add Milk into my daily diet for breakfast because i have 100-200 calories left over in the day and i dont know what type of milk to add. Now i was always brought up being taught that Whole milk is "Fattening and bad for you" But recently i started doing more research on it and a lot of things say its better and healthier than 1%, 2%, and even skim.

So im wondering is Whole milk good? or should i just buy 1% or skim.

Nothing wrong with whole milk but for general health it's a good idea to limit your saturated fat intake to about 10%.

bzyspecial
12-30-2017, 07:22 AM
i drink 1, 1.5 liter whole milk everday i dont think its bad

Mrpb
12-30-2017, 07:43 AM
i drink 1, 1.5 liter whole milk everday i dont think its bad

1.5 liter whole milk is about 33 gram saturated fat. Depending on the rest of your diet your saturated fat intake could come out quite high. Probably a good idea to get your cholesterol levels checked now and then.

WillBrink
12-30-2017, 07:45 AM
So im wondering is Whole milk good? or should i just buy 1% or skim.

Foods can't be reduced to "good" and "bad" so you need to learn that real T first to get an accurate answer.

dwightaroundya
12-30-2017, 10:18 AM
not quite... he was concerned about more than body composition, which should and does factor in the amount and contents on the food. But in his case, those 100-200 calories wouldn't matter.

It’s all about calories. Skim milk, whole milk, goat milk....200cals = 200cals

Mrpb
12-30-2017, 10:21 AM
Actually if you're bulking saturated fats are easier stored as body fat. Skimmed milk would be a better choice in that case.

WillBrink
12-30-2017, 11:26 AM
Actually if you're bulking saturated fats are easier stored as body fat. Skimmed milk would be a better choice in that case.

Meh. Which saturated fats? They're not all created equal. Two, while not conclusive, a number of studies find a correlation between dairy intake and weight loss. If full fat dairy meets your macros/cals for your goals, it's fine. The rest is usually pseudo science nonsense. Low fat/non fat is an easy way to cut some cals out of your diet however. I don't see much benefits to milk in general as it's mostly water. Rather get dairy protein from stuff like cottage cheese, whey, etc.

Mrpb
12-30-2017, 11:33 AM
Meh. Which saturated fats? They're not all created equal. Two, while not conclusive, a number of studies find a correlation between dairy intake and weight loss. If full fat dairy meets your macros/cals for your goals, it's fine. The rest is usually pseudo science nonsense. Low fat/non fat is an easy way to cut some cals out of your diet however. I don't see much benefits to milk in general as it's mostly water. Rather get dairy protein from stuff like cottage cheese, whey, etc.

"overeating SFA promotes hepatic and visceral fat storage"
http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2014/02/11/db13-1622

WillBrink
12-30-2017, 11:38 AM
"overeating SFA promotes hepatic and visceral fat storage"
http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2014/02/11/db13-1622

Key word being "overeating" and again, not all SFA are created equal.

Mrpb
12-30-2017, 11:45 AM
Key word being "overeating" and again, not all SFA are created equal.

Overfeeding a.k.a bulking, that's why I said "Actually if you're bulking saturated fats are easier stored as body fat. "

As for the idea that different types of SFA will cause different fat storage during overfeeding, I have not seen evidence for it.

WillBrink
12-30-2017, 12:02 PM
Overfeeding a.k.a bulking, that's why I said "Actually if you're bulking saturated fats are easier stored as body fat. "


No aware of data showing that in an appilible population we're discussing: active healthy populations getting above maintenance cals with resistance training. Attempting to extrapolate from diabetics and or sedentary types is not applicable and again, a number of studies find dairy, full fat and none, associated to weight loss, and short term RCTs do find the effect. Mechanism unclear.



As for the idea that different types of SFA will cause different fat storage during overfeeding, I have not seen evidence for it.

Different SFA chain lengths have varying effects on fatty acid synthesis and storage. MCTs, while I'm not a big proponent of per se, but sake of example, are technically SFA. Even the LSFA have differing effects. Older article by Dr. Steve Joyal with comments by yours truly, but still accurate:

http://www.brinkzone.com/articles/dietary-fats-and-carbohydrates-the-facts/

Mrpb
12-30-2017, 12:15 PM
Attempting to extrapolate from diabetics and or sedentary types is not applicable

They were healthy normal weight, young people, not diabetic.

Will resistance training change the effects of overfeeding on SFA? While we can't exclude the possibility I prefer to speculate as little as possible.



and again, a number of studies find dairy, full fat and none, associated to weight loss, and short term RCTs do find the effect. Mechanism unclear.

Not while overfeeding.



Different SFA chain lengths have varying effects on fatty acid synthesis and storage.

Sure but I doubt overfeeding on SFA is going to promote the adaptations we're looking for as bodybuilders. As said, I have not seen evidence and I don't see it in your article either.

WillBrink
12-30-2017, 12:44 PM
Sure but I doubt overfeeding on SFA is going to promote the adaptations we're looking for as bodybuilders. As said, I have not seen evidence and I don't see it in your article either.

And I have not seen evidence RT + + differing macros + overfeeding will = preferential storage of BF when/of other factors controlled for. It also appears approx 30% of cals from fat (and some data suggest SFA) needed for optimal T levels.

Impact will be altered with different macros and other factors, which is not speculative. Various RCTs suggest something about dairy products have unique effects of bodycomp and the fat content per se, not while ovefeeding as you correctly point out.

My take, it's more speculative than not to recommend avoidance of full fat milk when fat is important and some SFA also important, so back to: does it fit your cals and macros? If yes, don't worry about it. If not, low fat/non fat a good place to cut cals and fat.

I recommend of the 30% of cals from fat be it +/- cals, people follow the one third rule: one third MUFA, Omega 3, SFA, which will naturally include omega 6. The major variable in +/- cals is carbs.

ss4vegeta1
12-30-2017, 01:13 PM
Everything in moderation but PERSONALLY I BELIEVE that the animal eating a natural diet of grass changes the fatty acid composition being more balanced. If I drink WHOLE milk I prefer, Certified Organic Grassfed Whole Milk from a Grassfinished Animal (Born and Raised on Grass) and a A2 Protein based Animal such as Sheep, Goats or Buffalo Breed versus conventional cows. I noticed with the A2 I dont get constipation like the conventional or Jersey Cows.

Just sayin.

Mrpb
12-31-2017, 01:34 AM
It also appears approx 30% of cals from fat (and some data suggest SFA) needed for optimal T levels.

During overfeeding testosterone levels are rarely a concern. I've seen plenty of studies where fat intake was around 20% and testosterone levels were completely fine.

And you're probably aware that changes within the normal range have very little (if any) impact on hypertrophy.

Whole milk contains plenty of palmitic acid, which the overfeeding study that we do have shows can increase fat storage.

I hope someone will ever perform a study on whole milk overfeeding but for the time being I'd rather play it safe: skimmed milk contains more calories from protein and carbs, which both tend to do better in the overfeeding literature than (saturated) fats, and that includes some studies with RE. Lean bulking is hard enough as it is. If there's any advantage I can have, even if it may be small, I like to use it in my favor.

WillBrink
12-31-2017, 06:32 AM
During overfeeding testosterone levels are rarely a concern. I've seen plenty of studies where fat intake was around 20% and testosterone levels were completely fine.

And you're probably aware that changes within the normal range have very little (if any) impact on hypertrophy.

Whole milk contains plenty of palmitic acid, which the overfeeding study that we do have shows can increase fat storage.

I hope someone will ever perform a study on whole milk overfeeding but for the time being I'd rather play it safe: skimmed milk contains more calories from protein and carbs, which both tend to do better in the overfeeding literature than (saturated) fats, and that includes some studies with RE. Lean bulking is hard enough as it is. If there's any advantage I can have, even if it may be small, I like to use it in my favor.

Various ways to skin that cat, and per above, don't generally recommend milk at all. I'd posit: does it fit your cals and macros? If yes, don't worry about it. If not, low fat/non fat a good place to cut cals and fat.

EjnarKolinkar
12-31-2017, 09:54 AM
Well for 150 calories aren't we talking about a few grams of fat difference between 2% and whole?

A balanced diet and keeping things in context is important. It's best to avoid "Good or Bad" analysis in terms of food.